World

The Two-Way
7:50 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Cyclone Phailin Hits India With 120 MPH Winds; Thousands Flee

A man covers himself with a plastic sheet as a shield as he walks to a safer place near Gopalpur in eastern India Saturday. Hundreds of thousands of people living along India's eastern coastline took shelter from the massive powerful cyclone Phailin.
Biswaranjan Rout AP

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 2:35 pm

Cyclone Phailin has struck India's east coast in the Bay of Bengal, where more than 500,000 people have evacuated from vulnerable areas along the coast. Phailin reportedly packed sustained winds of more than 120 mph when the eye of the storm hit; strong winds will likely persist for hours to come.

Update at 3:15 p.m. ET:

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Asia
6:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Kerry Wraps Up Surprise Visit To Kabul

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 7:05 am

The secretary of state met with Afghan President Hamid Karzai in an effort to break the impasse in talks on a new bilateral security pact. Those negotiations will determine how many, if any, U.S. troops remain in the country after the NATO mission ends next year. Host Scott Simon speaks with NPR's Sean Carberry about the trip.

Asia
6:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Rebuilding A Small Town After Double Disaster

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 7:05 am

Cordova, Ala., got hit not by one but two tornadoes on the same day in 2011. The twisters destroyed much of the town, and in the past two years, people living there have struggled with how best to rebuild what was a dying town.

Asia
6:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Oops! Azerbaijan Releases Election Results Before Voting Begins

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 7:05 am

Azerbaijan's Central Election Commission announced President Ilham Aliyev had been re-elected a full day before voting had even begun. Host Scott Simon considers elections and democracy in Azerbaijan.

Asia
6:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

'This Chap Has Been A Colossus': Indian Cricket Star To Retire

Students hold a poster of Indian cricketer Sachin Tendulkar in March at school in Chennai, southern India.
AP

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 2:31 pm

Sachin Tendulkar is not only perhaps the best batsman to ever play cricket, he is considered an icon. Thursday, he announced his plan to retire.

It's almost impossible to find an American sports analogy for how huge Tendulkar is in India, where interest in cricket tends toward obsessive, says Indian Parliament member Shashi Tharoor.

"He is certainly the greatest Indian to ever wield a cricket bat, and possibly one of the greatest in the history of the entire sport worldwide," Tharoor explains to Weekend Edition host Scott Simon.

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All Tech Considered
6:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Red Cross Wants Video Games To Get Real On War Crimes

A gamer plays a war game at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles in June. The ICRC wants war games to spread understanding of the rules of armed conflict.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:46 am

There aren't universal laws of war when it comes to video games. Players can disregard the rules of the Geneva Convention without encountering any consequences. The International Committee of the Red Cross wants to change that.

ICRC spokesman Bernard Barrett says that for the past two years, a special unit of the Red Cross has been working with video game producers to help them simulate real-world sanctions for virtual war crimes.

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Asia
4:58 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Powerful Cyclone Barrels Toward India's East Coast

Villagers braving strong winds and rain reach for a cyclone center in Ganjam district, near the Indian city of Bhubaneswar.
Biswaranjan Rout AP

Strong winds and heavy rains pounded India's eastern coastline Saturday, as hundreds of thousands of people took shelter from a massive, powerful cyclone that was expected to reach land in a few hours.

The skies were dark — almost black — at midmorning in Bhubaneshwar, the capital of Orissa state and about 100 kilometers (60 miles) from the coast. Roaring winds made palm trees sway wildly, and to the south, seawater was pushing inland.

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Parallels
2:54 am
Sat October 12, 2013

What Did The Arab Spring Cost? One Estimate Says $800 Billion

Anti-government demonstrators crowd Cairo's Tahrir Square in February 2011. A report from HSBC says Egypt and other Arab Spring countries will lose a total of $800 billion by the end of next year because of the unrest.
Mohammed Abed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 10:41 am

The Arab Spring unleashed massive, region-wide political turmoil, unseated longtime strongmen and it's still playing out. But what did it all cost?

A lot, according to a new report from the bank HSBC:

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Parallels
3:54 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Syrians Are Widely Critical Of Nobel Peace Prize Decision

Men chat Thursday in front of badly damaged buildings in the central city of Homs. Many Syrians are critical of the Nobel Peace Prize that was announced Friday for the group that is in Syria to dismantle its chemical weapons program.
Yazan Homsy Reuters/Landov

Many Syrians are frustrated, disappointed and generally upset that the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the group that recently arrived in the country to dismantle the government's chemical weapons.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is a small, low-key outfit that has been placed in the international spotlight with its Syria mission and now a Nobel Prize.

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Middle East
3:52 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Peace Prize Winners Want To Rid The World Of Chemical Weapons

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

This year's Nobel Peace Prize goes to the international chemical weapons watchdogs now on the ground in Syria. The group has been working for a decade and a half to get rid of some of the world's deadliest weapons. Its latest mission is also its most dangerous, documenting and disposing of the Syrian government's stockpiles in an active war zone.

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