World

Middle East
3:37 am
Mon November 4, 2013

On U.S. Embassy Takeover Anniversary, Iran's Hardliners Rally

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 4:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

U.S. and Iranian negotiators are expected to meet again this week.

GREENE: The U.S. wants to resolve questions about Iran's nuclear program. Iran wants relief from American-led sanctions.

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Africa
3:37 am
Mon November 4, 2013

U.N. Warns Of Possible Genocide In Central African Republic

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 4:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

At a U.N. Security Council meeting over the weekend, diplomats warned of a possible genocide in the Central African Republic. This is a country right near the equator that borders the Congo and the Sudan. It's been in turmoil since a military coup in March left it basically without a functioning government. A half-million people, about a tenth of this country's population, have been forced from their homes in recent weeks as the violence has just gotten worse.

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Parallels
2:17 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Syria's Moderate Rebels Fight A Battle On Two Fronts

A Syrian fighter from the Islamist rebel group Jabhat al-Nusra inspects a resident's identification papers at a checkpoint in Aleppo on Oct. 26. Syria's Islamist fighters are generally better funded than their more moderate counterparts.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 4:28 pm

Like many Syrian exiles, Murhaf Jouejati, a professor at National Defense University, is frustrated by U.S. policy toward Syria. He says there's been only a trickle of U.S. aid to the secular, nationalist opposition in Syria, while the Islamists have no trouble raising money through their networks in the Arab world.

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Around the Nation
4:07 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

Far From Diwali's Lights, The Warm Glow Of Home

Little oil lamps mark Diwali celebrations in Allahabad, India, far away from American homes.
Sanjay Kanojia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 8:42 am

Small flickering oil lamps known as diyas are lighting up Indian homes in South Asian communities around the globe on Sunday as hundreds of millions of people observe Diwali.

Otherwise known as the Festival of Lights, it's a religious celebration of self-awareness and reflection. Diwali is a public holiday in a number of other nations, but it's not nearly so well-known in the U.S., where families must rely on themselves to keep the tradition alive.

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World
4:07 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

As Mirrors Beam Light To Town, Norwegians Share Patch Of Sun

People gather in the central square of Rjukan, Norway, on Wednesday to bask in the sun reflected by mirrors on a nearby mountainside.
NTB Scanpix/Reuters/Landov

The small town of Rjukan has long had to make do without sunlight during the cold Norwegian winters.

But that changed Wednesday, when the town debuted a system of high-tech mirrors to reflect sunlight from neighboring peaks into the valley below.

Rjukan, originally founded 100 years ago as an industrial outpost for the energy company Norsk Hydro, is nestled between several mountains and does not receive direct sunlight from late September to mid-March — nearly six months out of the year.

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