World

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Is terrorism the new normal?

This past year, images of carnage at subway stations, restaurants, workplaces, concerts and sporting events have flashed across the world’s social media and traditional news outlets.

Afterward, questions inevitably surface about what could have been done to prevent attacks in the first place, while people are encouraged to carry on with their usual lives. But has the shadow of terrorism become part of normal life and, if so, what are the public health implications?

Nepal's Living Goddess a Centuries-Old Tradition

Apr 25, 2016

Last year, during my visit to Nepal, I dropped by the home of a Living Goddess, called a Kumari Devi. The Kumari's attendants and family were preparing to carry her through the town to a local festival, and she was dressed in elaborate makeup and colorful silk clothes. The elders soon whisked her away to the festival, and I followed.

Snapshot: Behind the Walls Of Nepal's Women

Apr 25, 2016

The World's multimedia producer Sonia Narang is wrapping up a three-week trip to Nepal where she's been reporting on the difficult lives of women who still abide by centuries-old traditions.

Along a busy thoroughfare near Kathmandu, a passageway leads into a large, open-air courtyard. In the back corner, there’s a modest home, with a red sign outside that simply reads, “Living Goddess.”

A narrow wooden staircase leads up to the second floor, where the goddess spends much of her childhood. She’s called a Kumari and she’s worshipped by Nepali Hindus and Buddhists, who believe she's the reincarnation of the Hindu goddess Durga.

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Sonia Narang

I still remember the first time I saw one of Nepal's child goddesses. Three years ago this month, an attendant carried her in a procession through the historic, winding streets of Patan during the famous Rato Machendranath festival. I followed along with throngs of locals, both young and old, many who had come to seek her blessings. I later spent weeks reporting on the life of one child goddess during my visits to the Kathmandu Valley.

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Sonia Narang

As Nepal struggles to recover from the deadly earthquake one year ago, many of those who survived are living in makeshift tin shelters with no financial ability to rebuild real homes anytime soon. Here are the stories of people who lost their homes, livelihoods or access to basic needs in the disaster.

Many of the poorest families have stopped counting on Nepal's painfully slow government to assist them, and they're left with no other option but to make a new life in these flimsy shacks for a long time to come.

Wouldn't it be great if the world could get rid of malaria altogether?

We've got a long way to go. Last year, there were about 214 million cases and 438,000 deaths from the mosquito-borne disease.

But just in time for World Malaria Day, there is some good news on the malaria front.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Trains began picking up passengers at the Maelbeek metro station in Brussels on Monday morning, more than a month after a terrorist bombing killed more than a dozen people there and wounded many more. The city's metro is now largely back to normal — with a noticeable security presence.

"Only two entrances per station will be open for now, and police and army patrols will be maintained," Teri Schultz reports for our Newscast unit. "A commemorative wall has been put up in the station for anyone who wants to leave a message of support and condolences."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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