World

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In Washington, Turkey is seen as an important ally in the fight against the Islamic State, or ISIS, in Syria and Iraq. But Ankara is also struggling to quell a resurgent conflict with its own Kurdish minority.

A Japanese man who is missing nine fingers will be the first person to attempt to climb Mount Everest since a deadly earthquake rocked Nepal earlier this year. More than 9,000 people were killed, including at least 17 on the mountain.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We're going to learn more now about the man who tried to open fire on passengers on a French high-speed train on Friday. French authorities say he's a 26-year-old Moroccan who lived for years in Spain. Lauren Frayer reports from Madrid.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And the Federal Trade Commission is trying to combat the rising number of illegal automated phone calls. Patty Hsue is an attorney at the FTC who leads that effort. Welcome to the program.

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station received a shipment that included whiskey on Monday but they won't be allowed even a taste test.

The sun is beating down on the rocky shore of Lebanon's capital, Beirut, and architect Mona Hallak is taking her son and his friends to see their heritage.

"Who knows how to swim?" asks Hallak, an advocate for public beaches in Lebanon.

The kids say they can, but they learned in private beach clubs. Hallak tells them of the past, when Beirutis learned to swim in the sea because the shore was all public. She shows them a nearby area that was open and has been fenced off. She fears it, too, will be built on as many other places have been.

One evening last July, Nat Bradford walked along rows of White Bolita Mexican corn at his Sumter, S.C., farm, and nearly wept. All 1,400 of the corn plants had been overtaken almost overnight by corn smut, recalls Bradford, who's also a landscape architect. The smut, from a fungus called Ustilago maydis, literally transforms each corn kernel into a bulbous, bulging bluish-grey gall. It is naturally present in the soil and can be lofted easily into the air and onto plants.

Princesses have first days of school, too.

In one of those so-normal-it's-newsworthy moments, Princess Catharina-Amalia of the Netherlands posed for a first day of school picture in her driveway, wearing jeans and pink sneakers.

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