World

Religion
3:25 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Two Former Popes Approved For Sainthood

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:37 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Two of the most beloved popes in recent memory - John Paul II and John XXIII - have been formally approved for sainthood. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports that in his first four months as pope, Francis has shown great personal and spiritual affinity with these two predecessors.

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The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Florida Family, Historic Yacht Presumed Lost Off New Zealand

This undated photo provided by the St. Andrews Historic Seaport and Commercial Marina in Panama City, Fla., shows American David Dyche, skipper of the 70-foot (21-meter) vessel Nina.
AP

The search for six Americans and one British man lost in the seas between New Zealand and Australia was called off Friday after extensive aerial searches failed to turn up any sign of the 85-year-old wooden sailing boat they were traveling on.

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Parallels
9:37 am
Fri July 5, 2013

In Honduran Crimes, Police Are Seen As Part Of The Problem

A soldier watches over public transport users during an operation in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, in April. The crime rate is soaring in Honduras, and corrupt and ineffective law enforcement is widely seen as part of the problem.
Rafael Ochoa Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 5:13 pm

In the fight against drug trafficking, Central America has become a large recipient of U.S. aid, receiving nearly half a billion dollars over the past seven years. The money is being spent on strengthening police and military forces that are outgunned by the narcotics traffickers.

The goal is to repeat the kind of success that took place over time in places like Colombia.

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World
6:15 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Fancy Table Setting Sells For $3 Million At Auction

Back in 1922, the Maharaja of Patiala commissioned a new dining set ahead of a visit to India by the Prince of Wales. That silver-gilt set — 1,400 pieces — has sold at auction for $3 million. The prince later became King Edward VIII.

The Two-Way
6:13 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Egypt On Edge: Nation Braces For Protests Of Morsi's Ouster

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood hold a picture of deposed President Mohammed Morsi during a rally outside Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque on Friday.
Mahmud Hams AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:14 pm

(Click here for updates.)

After ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi's supporters in the Muslim Brotherhood called for mass protests Friday, there were reports of violence in the streets of Cairo and some other cities.

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Middle East
4:24 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Economic Instability To Cause Further Problems In Egypt

Economic struggles were at the heart of the uprising that resulted in the ouster of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi. For more on the market reaction to his downfall and the prospects for Egypt's economy, Renee Montagne talks with Farah Halime, an economic journalist and blogger based in Cairo.

Middle East
4:22 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Egypt's Islamists Call Coup 'Dark Day' For Democracy

Since the military coup on Wednesday that toppled Egypt's first democratically-elected civilian president, the army has been cracking down on his Islamist Muslim Brotherhood. There are, however, many in Egypt who continue to support the ousted Islamist government.

Latin America
3:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Latin Americans Leaders Respond To Bolivia's 'Humiliation'

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:19 am

South America's leftist leaders rallied on Thursday to support Bolivian President Evo Morales. Earlier in the week, his presidential plane was rerouted amid suspicions that NSA leaker Edward Snowden was on board.

Europe
2:34 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Are Things Too Cozy In London's 'City' Within A City?

Skyscrapers in the City of London, the heart of the financial district, are reshaping the skyline.
Dan Bobkoff NPR

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 1:33 pm

For at least a millennium, the heart of Britain's commercial and financial industries has been the City of London.

The City is not the large metropolis we know as London. It's much older and smaller. Many call it the Square Mile, though it's not square and a bit bigger than a mile. It's the home to big banks, medieval alleyways and St. Paul's Cathedral. And, for all those centuries, the area has had the same local government with an unusual name: The City of London Corporation.

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Africa
3:22 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

What Lies Ahead For Egypt

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 8:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

To talk more about the changes in Egypt, we turn to Michele Dunne. She's director of the Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East at the Atlantic Council, a think tank here in Washington. Welcome to the program.

DR. MICHELE DUNNE: Thanks, Audie.

CORNISH: So let's go back to the interim president, Adly Mansour. He was the supreme justice of Egypt's Supreme Constitutional Court. Tell us more about him and some of his ties to previous regimes.

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