World

Middle East
3:26 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

New Iranian President Known As The 'Diplomat Sheikh'

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 4:45 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Today, the new president of Iran vowed to follow the path of moderation and justice, not extremism. Hasan Rowhani talked of enhancing mutual trust between Iran and other countries. That marks a stark change in rhetoric from that of outgoing President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Rowhani campaigned as a reformist. He's also a cleric and Iran's former chief nuclear negotiator, who became known as the Diplomat Sheikh.

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Middle East
3:26 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Pakistan's New Government Faces Country Awash With Conflict

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 4:42 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Pakistan, a new government started work this month. It faces a country awash in conflict. To get a sense of just how complicated it is to govern Pakistan, NPR's Philip Reeves focused on one 48-hour period. He chose this past weekend.

PHILIP REEVES, BYLINE: For many Pakistanis, this was supposed to be a fun weekend. Their national cricket team was playing the old enemy, India.

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Parallels
2:20 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

The Elusive Quest For An Iranian Moderate

Iran's newly elected president, Hasan Rowhani, gave a news conference in the capital Tehran on Monday. He said he would pursue a path of moderation.
Ebrahim Noroozi AP

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 3:36 pm

Ever since Iran's 1979 Islamic Revolution, the U.S. has been in search of moderate Iranian leaders who could steer the country away from its hostile standoff with America.

To cite one famous example, President Ronald Reagan's administration secretly sold weapons to Iran in the mid-1980s in the belief it could work with the country's "moderate" elements even as Iran remained under the control of revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

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Author Interviews
1:24 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

WWII 'Deserters': Stories Of Men Who Left The Front Lines

The Deserters is Charles Glass' second book relating to World War II. His last book, Americans in Paris, told the story of the U.S. citizens who remained in the French capital after the 1940 German invasion.
Penguin Press

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 4:11 pm

Few citizens are more honored than military veterans, and there's particular reverence for those who defeated the Nazis in World War II. Like any war, however, World War II was complicated and traumatic for those on the ground, and not a few deserted from the front lines.

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Middle East
12:45 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Is Big Change Ahead In Iran? A Biography Of The President Elect

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 7:56 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

In Tehran today, the first news conference of Iran's president-elect ended abruptly when a man in the audience jumped up to protest the absence of the man many believe was elected president four years ago, Mir-Hossein Mousavi has been held under house arrest since 2011. And after the interruption, President-elect Hasan Rouhani left the stage and state television pulled the plug on the live broadcast.

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The Salt
12:27 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Italian University Spreads The 'Gelato Gospel'

Thousands of students from around the world flock to courses near Bologna, in central Italy, at the headquarters of Carpigiani, the leading global manufacturer of gelato-making machines.
Giuseppe Cacace AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 3:12 pm

Italy has secured its place in the global diet with the likes of espresso, cappuccino, pasta and pizza.

The latest addition to the culinary lexicon is ... gelato, the Italian version of ice cream.

And despite tough economic times, gelato-making is a booming business.

At Anzola dell'Emilia, a short drive from the Italian city of Bologna, people from all over the world are lining up for courses in gelato-making.

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Business
9:40 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Economists To G-8: Want Growth? Try This

A 2013 Accord is ready to come off the line at the Honda automobile plant in Marysville, Ohio, in 2012. Accords built at the 4,400-employee plant are shipped to South Korea — an example of the importance of trade to manufacturing jobs.
Paul Vernon Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 11:13 am

If economists were cheerleaders, their favorite shout-out might be: "What do we want? Growth! When do we want it? Now!"

They won't actually shout those words, but they may be thinking them as global leaders meet this week for a G-8 summit. Economists are hoping that at the gathering in Northern Ireland, leaders of eight major economies will discuss expanding global trade and investment to spur job creation.

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The Two-Way
6:58 am
Mon June 17, 2013

'Guardian': Documents Show Britain, U.S. Spied At World Summits

A young girl holds up a cutout image of Edward Snowden's face at the start of a rally in support of the NSA leaker over the weekend in Hong Kong.
Jessica Hromas Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 10:36 am

The Edward Snowden saga continues: Last night, citing classified documents leaked by the former Booz Allen Hamilton employee, The Guardian newspaper reported that the United States and the United Kingdom spied on their allies during the 2009 G-20 global summit meetings in England.

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The Two-Way
5:55 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Blind Activist Chen Says NYU Pressured By China To Force Him Out

Chinese human rights activist Chen Guangcheng during a ceremony in January where he was presented the Tom Lantos Human Rights Prize.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 9:41 am

Chen Guangcheng says New York University is ending his fellowship after it received "unrelenting pressure" from "Chinese communists."

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Middle East
4:26 am
Mon June 17, 2013

U.S. War Planes Participate In Exercises In Jordan

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 12:13 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Syria's Arab neighbors are increasingly being drawn into that country's conflict. Over the weekend, the Egyptian president cut all diplomatic ties with Syria and called for a no-fly zone to protect rebels there.

In Jordan - right next door to Syria - King Abdullah told graduates at the country's military academy that he would defend against any spillover from the fighting. That followed a Pentagon decision to base Patriot missiles and a squadron of F-16 fighter planes in the country.

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