World

World
5:38 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

New Refugees Overcome Stress, Uncertainty and other Obstacles

Edumakono Zetho was born in the Democratic Republic of Congo. He fled to a refugee camp in Tanzania, and now calls Milwaukee home.
Credit Ann-Elise Henzl

By September, Wisconsin will have 990 new residents who’ve come here as refugees. They’re among 70,000 the nation is welcoming this federal fiscal year.

Refugees have been settling in Wisconsin for more than a century, so systems are in place to meet their needs, such as housing and food. Some need mental health help, as well.

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World
4:53 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Four Priorities for the United Nations in a Changing World

The UN building in New York, N.Y.
Credit Photo by Ashitaka San, Flickr

The eyes of the world remain on Boston in the wake of Monday’s bombings at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The attacks, which killed three, were described by President Obama as an act of terror.

While the incident was not as deadly as the 9/11 attacks, it was a reminder that in a global context, terrorism is a sad and frequent fact of life around the world. It’s one confronted by police forces and government agencies, but also by the United Nations.

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World
5:43 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Nearly 1,000 Refugees Begin New Lives in Wisconsin

Iraqi family members embrace, after reuniting at General Mitchell International Airport. Some of the family members came here as refugees years ago; others just arrived this month.
Credit Ann-Elise Henzl

Thousands rallied in Washington last week, urging Congress to create a path to citizenship, for undocumented immigrants.

Meanwhile, the U.S. continues to welcome a different set of people from other countries: refugees. They’ve fled their native lands, to escape persecution.

This year, the U.S. government will welcome 70,000 refugees. About 1,000 will head to Wisconsin.

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World
1:01 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Catholic Church's Reach, Challenges Lead to Worldwide Attention on Conclave

The world is watching as cardinals begin the process of selecting a new pope.
Credit Servizio Fotografico L'Osservatore Romanov via Getty Images

When Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation last month, the news catapulted into headlines worldwide. Media coverage has continued nearly nonstop, as the Catholic Church prepares to select its next leader. Some outlets have almost treated the process as they would a sports tournament – with analysts and even odds on who will emerge as the next pope.

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World
12:54 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Transcript: Sen. Johnson Questions Clinton on Benghazi Attack

Wednesday morning at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing, Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin questioned Secretary of State Hillary Clinton about the attacks that took place on September 11, 2012 at the U.S. embassy in Benghazi, Libya.

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World
8:16 am
Tue December 18, 2012

What's it Like, Living at Sea? Captain of Last International Ship to Leave Milwaukee, Shares His Sto

ederal EMS freighter at the Port of Milwaukee

The Port of Milwaukee bid farewell this month, to its final international visitor of the season.

The ship “Federal EMS” deposited a load of steel and then hurried off to other Great Lakes ports – needing to pass through the St. Lawrence Seaway before it closes for winter.

Before the ocean-going vessel departed, I visited Captain, Andrzej Lasota to learn about life at sea.

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NPR Story
4:29 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

A Montana Doctor Is Humbled By A Month Of Treating Ebola Patients

Dr. Risi (top, center) spent a month working with the medical team at Kenema General Hospital, the largest Ebola treatment center in Sierra Leone.
Courtesy of George Risi

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 5:54 pm

In 30 years of practicing medicine, Dr. George Risi has never had an experience as emotionally draining as his month in Sierra Leone.

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NPR Story
4:29 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

The Insights Of An Ebola Doctor Who Became A Patient

Ebola survivor Dr. Kent Brantly and his wife, Amber, leave a news conference after his release from Emory University Hospital on Aug. 21.
John Bazemore AP

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 5:19 pm

He had cared for Ebola patients. He himself caught the virus. Only then, said Dr. Kent Brantly, did he fully grasp the awful nature of this disease.

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World
1:05 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

China's Seismic Population Shift: Why an "Urban" China Matters

Michelle Dammon Loyalka's new book details China's urban migration.
University of California Press

Two hundred million rural peasants move to China's booming cities - every year. This seismic shift offers China some major economic advantages in the global economy, and has ramifications for the rest of the world.

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Project Milwaukee
9:25 am
Thu November 18, 2010

Where Does Your Coffee Grow?

Coffee farm in El Salvador.

Contributor Chris Hallberg lives in Wauwatosa. He recently returned from a ten-month Fulbright Fellowship in El Salvador where he met up with two Stone Creek employees who were visiting a coffee farm, and produced this audio essay for our Project Milwaukee: What's on Our Plate? series.

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