News

Nicole Acosta / Botanica Creative

If you tuned in last week, you know that Ex Fabula is joining the festivities for this month’s Tosa's All-City Read. The idea is “to bring neighbors together and build a sense of camaraderie and community while promoting literacy at all ages.” This month, the community will dive into the pages of A Man Called Ove, a novel about neighbors and so much more.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Alderman Jose Perez was all smiles as people of different ages, nationalities and sexual orientations lingered after his official work was done. City leaders had just thrown a news conference to mark Milwaukee’s new municipal identification card.

Perez helped create the program.

djoronimo / Fotolia

Among all the programs in Milwaukee connecting children with the arts, there is perhaps no more remarkable a group than the Latino Arts Strings Program. Based at Latino Arts on Milwaukee’s near south side, the program produces remarkable string players who might not otherwise have access to instruments or high-level music instruction.

Winter is the time of year people in Wisconsin talk about needing to get their vitamin D. The sun is at a lower angle, the clouds loom overhead, and many think it's a given that we're D-deficient. 

But the sun isn't the only way we get vitamin D, a point Dr. Alexander Arnold is making as the featured February speaking for UW-Milwaukee's Science Bag series. Arnold is an associated professor of chemistry and biochemistry at UW-Milwaukee, and will be taking on the science of vitamin D for the series. 

Stasique / Fotolia

Governor Walker’s proposed biennial budget calls for increases in funding for K-12 schools and the University of Wisconsin System.

But with unemployment and underemployment among the social issues that affected voter behavior in last fall’s elections, some are taking a closer look at how the education system is preparing students for the workforce. A key part of that equation is so-called Career and Technical Education, or CTE.

David Sherman

Whether it's the travel ban or the temporary suspension of refugee admissions, immigration issues are at the forefront these days. As the United States and the world grapple with refugees from Africa and the Middle East, in the 1930s and '40s, the international community needed to respond to the increasing number of European Jews fleeing Nazi Germany.  

Lisa F. Young, fotolia

A few years ago, the Milwaukee-based Public Policy Forum reported the state was facing a looming nursing shortage, due to an aging population and an aging workforce. 

A recent collaboration announced seeks to close that nursing gap. A $2.3 million fund from United Healthcare’s United Health Foundation to Milwaukee Area Technical College, or MATC, stands to greatly increase the college's ability to educate nurses.

The City of Milwaukee faces the daunting challenge of replacing the lead pipes that deliver drinking water to 70,000 older homes. The task will stretch over years and comes at a mind-numbing cost.

This morning at City Hall, Milwaukee’s Water Quality Task Force will discuss its next steps.

The Common Council formed the group last September, after Mayor Tom Barrett unexpectedly recommended that families living in homes built before 1951 install water filters, to shield young children and pregnant women from possible lead exposure.

Audrey Nowakowski

For this week’s Bubbler Talk, we visit the Pryor Avenue Iron Well in Bay View. Listener Lisa asked: What can you tell me about the Bay View Spring on Pryor Avenue? Why and how did it start? It's still running; do people still drink from it?

Built in 1882, the Pryor Avenue Iron Well is the only one that remains in the entire city of Milwaukee. In Bay View alone, there used to be six wells throughout the neighborhood for residents to use.

Have you noticed that you’re not seeing many ads for the upcoming Wisconsin Supreme Court election? That’s because only one person is running – the incumbent. 

Conservative-leaning Justice Annette Ziegler has no challenger this spring – it means she’s virtually assured of another ten year term on the court.

Walker
WHITNEY CURTIS/GETTY IMAGES

During his budget address Wednesday, Governor Walker said his budget prioritizes student success and accountable government, and rewards work. The governor also tucked nearly $600 million in tax cuts over the next two years into his plan. 

READ: Gov. Walker's 2017-19 Proposed Budget

Courtesy of Jorie Malan

Jorie Malan's, a Brookfield native who now lives in Atlanta, work as a makeup artist has included stints on Broadway shows, television and film work.

Malan's resume includes major Broadway shows such as The Lion King, Mary Poppins, Shrek and Grease, as well as films and TV shows. She's currently wrapping up production on the fourth season of Fox's Sleepy Hollow.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Two very different projects illustrate the overlap of green space and development.

Several hundred residents turned out Tuesday evening for an open house to discuss master planning of Wauwatosa's Life Sciences District. Many people are riveted to a small wooded area they fear could be developed. While today, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett unveiled a 3/5 acre project that will blend storm water management and public space.

FONDY FARMERS MARKET GREEN SPACE

LaToya Dennis

Across Milwaukee County, heroin is killing people. Last year, more than 140 people succumbed to the drug. For years now, lawmakers have been passing legislation and convening groups - hoping to come up with new ways to tackle the growing problem.

Tuesday, WUWM spoke with a man who described his struggle to break the addiction. Today, we sat down for dinner with a group of 12 men enrolled in treatment at Serenity Inns on Milwaukee’s north side.

Ann Althouse, flickr

There’s disagreement among state Republicans over some items that Gov. Walker will likely propose in his budget Wednesday. Gov. Walker has indicated that he will call for more funding for K-12 schools, particularly in rural areas. 

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos is pleased. He says many public schools have seen declining enrollment and it affects the amount of money the state sends them.

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