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Milwaukee County hired a man in 2016, with the goal of making life better here for struggling African Americans. Nate Holton has been a community activist for years. Now he helps manage the county’s Office on African American Affairs. Today, as the country honors the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior, Holton reflects on King’s influence.

Nate Holton says he knew when he was young that he wanted to help improve the lives of Milwaukee’s black residents. He says Dr. King was his inspiration.

Marge Pitrof

The Obama administration's Affordable Care Act is not perfect, but it has enabled the United States to take a major step forward in making health insurance available to all Americans, multiple speakers told a crowd Sunday morning, on Milwaukee's south side.

Art Montes

Ex Fabula Fellows will be busy in the coming weeks. So this week we'll feature some favorite stories from last season. Ex Fabula Fellows are community members who use personal stories to inspire community-led dialogue around some of the most pressing issues in the Greater Milwaukee area: segregation, as well as economic and racial inequality.

Wisconsin Misses Chances to Cut Risk of Lead Exposure in Drinking Water

18 hours ago
Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism

Fearing that lead from drinking water had poisoned their children, nearly 30 people gathered on a December evening to press for answers.

The event at the House of Prayer, a small church on Milwaukee’s northwest side, was organized by Tory Lowe, a community activist working to raise awareness of lead-in-water issues.

Marge Pitrof

Demonstrators in Milwaukee pledged to fight any new policies emerging from a Trump White House that would weaken protections for undocumented immigrants, migrant dairy workers, students, members of the Muslim religion, LGBT community and refugees.

Late Saturday morning, the protesters marched from the near south side to the Milwaukee County Courthouse where speakers and music stirred the crowd. Dozens of people had driven in from Madison, Racine and other Wisconsin cities, to take part.

Earlier this week, Milwaukee Magazine and Lake Effect kicked off a new, monthly live conversation series. This month’s MilMag Live! event focused on two topics. The first of those was the influence of insiders and outsiders in shaping Milwaukee.

The discussion was led by Lake Effect's Mitch Teich and Carole Nicksin from Milwaukee Magazine. One of the areas of richest discussion was what brings people to Milwaukee, and what drives them away. 

The panel included: 

Much of writer Emily Fridlund’s new novel, A History of Wolves, plays out in a remote part of a lonely town in northern Minnesota. But anyone who reads it could probably substitute the north woods of Wisconsin as an appropriate image.

Check cashing stores and payday loan centers have a checkered reputation, to put it mildly. Critics say their high interest rates and fees take advantage of people who are already financially disadvantaged. But the truth is, these alternative financial systems are proliferating in Wisconsin and around the country.

Writer Lisa Servon wondered why. Servon is a professor of city and regional planning at the University of Pennsylvania and her new book is called The Unbanking of America: How the New Middle Class Survives.

lalaland.movie / © 2016 Summit Entertainment, LLC

La La Land made Golden Globe history this past weekend – winning 7 awards, including best Musical or Comedy Motion Picture, best actor and actress and musical score. But, whether it will continue its success at the Oscars remains to be seen.

Paying homage to MGM’s golden age of movie musicals, classics such as Singing In the Rain, Funny Face and An American in Paris are just a few of La La Land's inspirations. There’s singing, dancing, piano playing, painted sets and a star-studded cast.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Habitat for Humanity is known for partnering with Milwaukee families to build or improve the places they call home. A few years ago, volunteers created a program to help fund those homes - a deconstruction crew.

Adam Ryan Morris / Milwaukee Magazine

Chances are that even if you have never attended a local pro wrestling meet, an idea of what one looks like probably comes to mind. You might imagine a tightly packed room in a small arena or community center.  You might think of the sounds, or even the smells that inhabit the space - sweat, beer, hot dogs.

http://jackieevancho.com/photo-album/official-photos/

Update:

While most Presidential inaugurations feature performances from high-profile musicians, the upcoming Trump inauguration has thus far been notable for not having such performances booked.

To date, the only solo performer confirmed to perform is 16-year-old Jackie Evancho, who will sing the National Anthem.

Quorum Architects and Ayres Associates

Update: 

Quorum Architects - Ayres Associates has been named winner of Harbor District, Inc.'s Take Me to the River Design Competition.

According to the selection committee, Quorum's Slosh Park project was selected for its "elements that would make for an interesting and engaging space" as well as for "most effectively balanc[ing] several [of the project's] goals."

WUWM Susan Bence

What do you want President-elect Donald Trump to know about you and your community?

WUWM, WPR and NPR asked that question during its A Nation Engaged community conversation Wednesday evening at The Back Room @ Colectivo Coffee in Milwaukee.

NPR Political Correspondent Don Gonyea moderated a panel and took comments and questions from the audience, with the help of WUWM's Mitch Teich, executive producer of Lake Effect, and WPR's Kyla Calvert Mason.

The panel included:

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Waukesha reports that it is in full steam ahead mode with plans to deliver Lake Michigan water to its residents. At the meantime, a consortium of U.S. and Canadian mayors, the Great Lakes St Lawrence Cities Initiative, are fighting to halt the project.

While the Compact Council already cast its unanimous support in favor of Waukesha last summer, the body will listen to both sides in the next month or so.

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