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Courtesy of the Delavan Historical Society

Wisconsin’s history with the circus dates back before we became a state. During much of the 19th century, Wisconsin was a mecca for circuses and menageries, at one time hosting more than 100 such companies during the winter months. Many of these companies were looking for a place to call home that had abundant land, fresh water, and a central staging spot for the summer season for all of their animals and employees.

WUWM Radio

WUWM listeners are familiar with the baritone voice of NPR's Morning Edition co-host David Greene.

Greene is one of the voices that bring national and international stories to listeners over their morning coffee or on commutes to work. He came to the hosting chair after working as an NPR foreign correspondent covering Russia. He also spent four years covering the White House and presidential politics for the network.

http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/250258/smoke-by-dan-vyleta/

What would our world be like if every emotion we had was visible on our bodies? If our triumphs, but also our indiscretions, were revealed to the naked eye?

Bill Ingalls/NASA

On July 4th, NASA’s Juno spacecraft will enter orbit around Jupiter, and it's been a long time in the making. An Atlas V rocket launched with the Juno spacecraft from Cape Canaveral, Florida on August 5, 2011. It's five-year, 400 million mile voyage to Jupiter will soon have it orbiting the planet to investigate its origin.

Thomas Hawk, Flickr

 The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Milwaukee can no longer enforce its residency requirement. The court decided 5-2 that the city's long-standing requirement that city workers also live in Milwaukee violates state law. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett is furious, and says the state legislature, the governor's office, and the Supreme Court have all thumbed their nose at the concept of local control. 

    

Waukesha leaders continued to celebrate on Wednesday. Earlier this week, all eight Great Lakes states voted to allow the city to draw water from Lake Michigan.

The city sits outside the Great Lakes basin but says it needs the water because Waukesha’s underground supply is running low and is tainted with radium. Waukesha plans to pump-in Lake Michigan water from Oak Creek’s utility because talks with Milwaukee did not advance.

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There’s been a lot of talk lately about guns and gun laws in the U.S.

Last week, a man opened fire, killing 49 people at a nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

This week, Congress decided not to pass several bills that would have reformed the country’s gun laws.

On the same day, a Connecticut judge upheld that state’s ban on assault weapons. Connecticut acted after gunman there killed 20 young children at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012.

Robin Laananen

When Jessica Lea Mayfield began writing music at the age of eleven, she never would have guessed that in four short years, Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys would discover her. Her White Lies EP, released when she was fifteen, caught the attention of the indie rock veteran and he helped her develop the roots to an early career in music.

Rachel Morello

Thursday marks a big deadline for Milwaukee Public Schools. It’s the day district officials must decide what they think should be done for failing MPS schools.

It’s a decision almost two years in the making. State legislators created the framework for a turnaround program in 2015, and debate has raged over the program’s design, even its mere existence, ever since.

Kaleigh Gamache

Auditions. They are a necessary evil in the performing arts. Even in amateur productions, there are almost always too many people for not enough parts. So actors, dancers and singers quickly learn they have about three minutes on stage to make the director or casting agent choose them over the many others also auditioning.

Milwaukee Opera Theatre decided to commission a piece about that experience and the result is Thank You. NEXT? A Reality Opera.

Harper Collins/Katherine Tegen Books

Of all the classic literary detectives, the ones that are still alive and most vibrant in our collective consciousness are the obsessively deductive Sherlock Holmes – and his stalwart friend, biographer and quasi-assistant, John Watson.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote four novels and more than 50 short stories featuring the analytical Holmes, more than a century ago. But Doyle’s version was only the beginning. Holmes and Watson have been adapted for every time and nearly every place in the years since.

Susan Bence

Tuesday all eight Great Lake states said “yes” to Waukesha's request to draw water from Lake Michigan. It was a historic moment because it was the first test of the Great Lakes Compact, which restricts diversions outside the basin.

The city's underground water supply is dwindling and increasingly contaminated with cancer-causing radium, so Waukesha spent years building its case that the Great Lakes are its only sustainable source for clean drinking water.

Titus Wamai

On June 15 in front of a packed Pabst Theater, kids and adults who have been touched by gun violence took the stage to perform in Precious Lives: The Live Show.

Listen to the entire performance here:

WUWM and 371 Produced dedicates this performance to those in our community who have lost a loved one to gun violence and to everyone working for peace.

A question and answer session, moderated by Precious Lives executive producer Brad Lichtenstein, took place after the live performance. You can listen to the cast answer audience questions here:

LaToya Dennis

Summer has arrived. And for people in Milwaukee who every winter ask themselves why they stay, summer is often reason enough. Beautiful weather, lots of hiking and swimming and camping. Basically, the opportunity to reconnect with nature. There’s a new group in town hoping to forge stronger relationships between black people and the great outdoors.

So there’s this long held stereotype that black people, especially in the north, don’t “do” the outdoors. There’s no interest in hiking, water sports are out and camping, forget about it.

Photos.com

Car thefts have been all over the Milwaukee news lately, and with good reason. Data point to an 11 percent increase last year, and numbers continuing to grow in 2016. The jump is one reason why the city’s Public Safety Committee has scheduled a half-dozen special meetings.

 Members are also concerned about homicides. They are tracking below 2015, but it was a violent year. The Wisconsin Department of Justice was the latest on Monday to testify on why the state’s largest city is seeing a surge in certain crimes.

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