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Environment
12:16 pm
Fri April 22, 2011

Nature Writer Revels in Wisconsin River's Splendor

Jean Clausen spends part of every day writing about the bird activity and other natural events along the Wisconsin River.

Today is Earth Day. What’s become an international event, was the brainchild of the late Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin. Over the years, the U.S. Senator inspired millions of people around the world to address dangers threatening the environment.

Jean Clausen has found inspiration in the world around her. The 95-year-old nature writer helped save the “once endangered” bald eagles that now thrive on the Wisconsin River. world to address dangers threatening the environment.

WUWM environmental reporter Susan Bence motored up to her riverbank cottage, 30 miles northwest of Madison. She caught Clausen in the middle of intense bird watching, and chronicling. world to address dangers threatening the environment.

Jean Clausen is excited! She just spotted a small woodpecker - a yellow-bellied sapsucker - feasting at one of her many feeders. world to address dangers threatening the environment.

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Arts & Culture
2:03 pm
Mon April 18, 2011

The Secret Sisters - Not Really Secret, Definitely Sisters

Laura and Lydia Rogers are The Secret Sisters.
Credit Photo courtesy Secret Sisters

Laura and Lydia Rogers chat with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich.

  The Secret Sisters put their own stamp on the mid-20th century American songbook.

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Civil War
10:30 am
Wed April 13, 2011

The Spur & the Sash

These are the actual spur and sash passed down through generations of Robert Grede's family that inspired his first novel, The Spur & the Sash, about a Civil War love story.

A local author writes about a Civil War-era Romeo and Juliet. Robert Grede's first novel is The Spur & The Sash, published by Three Towers Press. He spoke with Stephanie Lecci last fall. Grede will discuss his book at the Wisconsin Veterans Museum on Friday.

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Civil War
10:04 am
Wed April 13, 2011

Iron Brigade & Beyond: Wisconsin in the Civil War - Part 1

As the nation honors the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War, we look at Wisconsin's role in the War Between the States.

On the sesquicentennial anniversary of the siege on Fort Sumter, we hear about Wisconsin’s contributions to the Civil War. Lance Herdegen is the chair of the Wisconsin Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission and former director of the Institute of Civil War Studies at Carroll University. Today marks the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War’s first battle, the siege of Fort Sumter.

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Environment
2:43 pm
Thu March 24, 2011

Keeping Carpet from the Landfill

Feeding the machine

Our environmental reporter Susan Bence rolls up to a budding Milwaukee recycling business. Be it Berber, Persian or shag, the carpet recycler helps keep it out of the landfill.

Regional
1:06 pm
Tue March 22, 2011

Residency Rules: The Detroit Experience

An abandoned home in Detroit.
Credit Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

The debate over where city of Milwaukee employees are allowed to live takes center stage at the state Capitol Tuesday. A Senate committee will hold a public hearing on a bill that would do away with the requirement that Milwaukee police officers and fire fighters reside within the city limits. Gov. Scott Walker’s budget would also scrap the residency rule for Milwaukee’s 6,000 public school teachers. More than a decade ago, state lawmakers in Michigan made a similar move, giving city of Detroit workers the freedom to live wherever they want. WUWM’s Erin Toner spoke with a few people about how those changes have impacted the Motor City.

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Politics & Government
2:23 pm
Fri March 11, 2011

Civil Rights Activist Looks at Protests Then and Now

Margaret (Peggy) Rozga in the WUWM studios.

One of the people watching – and taking part in -- the Madison protests has been Margaret (Peggy) Rozga.

She’s an English professor at UW-Waukesha, but perhaps is best known as the widow of James Groppi. He was the former Catholic priest and activist who was a major leader in the civil rights movement in Milwaukee in the 1960s.

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Politics & Government
2:21 pm
Tue March 8, 2011

Phony Walker, Koch Call Raises Political, Journalistic Ethics Questions

Gov. Scott Walker

Democrats are accusing Governor Scott Walker of breaking ethics and campaign finance laws during a phone conversation he thought he was having with billionaire David Koch. The state Democratic Party Monday filed a formal complaint with the Government Accountability Board. WUWM’s Erin Toner reports that the case has raised ethics questions, not only in the political realm, but also in the field of journalism.

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Recall Election
3:04 pm
Mon March 7, 2011

Recall Fever: Historic Recalls in Wisconsin

More than 1/3 of Wisconsin’s state senators could be fighting for their political future because of voter outrage over the governor’s budget repair bill.

A number of recall attempts have been launched against the Democrats who’ve left the state to delay a vote, as well as Republicans who support Gov. Walker’s divisive proposal.

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Capitol Protests
2:19 pm
Fri March 4, 2011

Capitol Must Remain Open to Public During Business Hours

Demonstrators were ordered out of the Capitol Thursday night after nearly three weeks of protests.

A Dane County Circuit Judge ordered all remaining demonstrators to leave the state Capitol late Thursday. There were about 100 there at the time. Judge John Albert says the building should return to normal business hours. For more than two weeks, the Capitol has been filled the protesters around the clock, most demanding that Governor Walker or the Legislature drop his plan to rescind most collective bargaining rights for public workers. WUWM’s LaToya Dennis is here in the studio with me this morning, with the latest developments. To recap the situation, Capitol police asked protesters to vacate the Capitol late Sunday, so the building could be cleaned. Most did leave, but officers allowed the rest to remain, rather than risk confrontation. Then, the DOA, the Department of Administration began limiting access to the building in order to minimize disruption and return a sense of normalcy. But unintended consequences resulted.

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