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Project Milwaukee
12:31 pm
Fri June 12, 2009

Push for School Integration

We continue our series Project Milwaukee: Black and White with a look at school segregation. The push to integrate the schools flared racial tensions here in the 1960s and 1970s. The results of the fight were mixed. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl has our report.

Words used in the story may be offensive to some, but are integral to the report.

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Project Milwaukee
12:26 pm
Thu June 11, 2009

The 1960s: A Decade of Turmoil and Change in Milwaukee

A store on this block at 18th and Fond Du Lac was looted during Milwaukee's 1967 civil disturbance.

Effects of long term discrimination in Milwaukee rose to a boiling point in the 1960s. The period included a nearly decades long push for fair housing. That struggle was interrupted in 1967 by a violent disturbance which some people still refer to today as the Milwaukee "riot."

Our “Project Milwaukee” series focusing on race relations continues now with a look back at a turbulent time.

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Project Milwaukee
12:24 pm
Thu June 11, 2009

Historical Overview of Early Milwaukee Race Relations

Milwaukee-born writer and historian John Gurda is a Lake Effect contributor. He’s been studying the history of Milwaukee since 1972, and has authored 18 books, including The Making of Milwaukee. He gives Mitch Teich a brief overview of race relations in Milwaukee from the early 19th century through the 1950s.

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Regional
12:19 pm
Thu June 11, 2009

The Story of Joshua Glover

Amateur historian George Gonis tells the story of Joshua Glover, a runaway slave freed from Milwaukee's courthouse jail in what is now Cathedral Square by a mob of abolitionists.
Credit Sulfur

George Gonis is the board president of the Joshua Glover-Cathedral Square project, which wants to create a monument to Glover's story and its national impact. He explains to Lake Effect's Stephanie Lecci how the 1854 freeing of runaway slave Joshua Glover by a mob of abolitionist Milwaukeeans reverberated across the country.

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Project Milwaukee
12:06 pm
Thu June 11, 2009

Settlement at Hillsboro, WI

Cheyenne Valley Reunion
Photos courtesy of Darrell Lofton.

Descendants of the original settlers of Wisconsin’s Cheyenne Valley gathered at Cardinal Stritch University last year to talk about their childhoods in and around Hillsboro, once Wisconsin’s largest African American settlement. We heard the voices of Wilbur Arms, Claude Bugbee, Barb Stanek, Rita Marie Witter, Iva Mae Roberts Storey and Mike Thompson. Jane Hampden produced our feature, which originally aired in 2008.

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Project Milwaukee
11:57 am
Thu June 11, 2009

Housing Discrimination More Subtle Today

President/CEO William Tisdale says council works to change behavior in housing practices

There’s been talk of a post-racial America developing, as the presidency of Barack Obama unfolds. Yet it appears great strides are needed, including in southeastern Wisconsin. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council has been fighting housing discrimination for 30 years, and yet staff members say people here are still denied housing because of their race.

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Project Milwaukee
11:53 am
Thu June 11, 2009

Early History of Race Relations

Milwaukee has long been known as one of the most segregated cities in the country. This morning, WUWM begins to explore whether that reputation still holds true today. During our Project Milwaukee coverage, we’ll look at the state of race relations in the city, how they’ve improved and where there’s still room for growth. WUWM’s Erin Toner begins our series with a view on the early history of blacks and whites living together in Milwaukee.

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Project Milwaukee
11:49 am
Thu June 11, 2009

Recollections of Life in Bronzeville

Artist Sylvester Sims and a current project

Today is the beginning of our annual Project Milwaukee series. This week and next, we’re examining race relations in the city – how blacks and whites have interacted throughout history, and where those relationships stand today. This morning, we heard about the early history of race relations in Milwaukee – from before the Civil War to the end of World War II. Now, we hear from a man who’s part of that history. WUWM's Erin Toner reports.

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Project Milwaukee
9:57 am
Thu June 11, 2009

Effects of Past Discrimination Still Profound

Today through next week, WUWM’s Project Milwaukee will examine the state of black-white relations in our community. Earlier this morning, we reported on historic events that brought African Americans to Milwaukee, where the two races began sharing the city. However, their time living side by side was relatively short, according to Marc Levine, Director of the UWM Center for Economic Development. He says those already here, along with realtors, lenders and even the government were of the mind that mixed neighborhoods were unstable. Rules and discrimination followed.

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Environment
1:55 pm
Fri May 22, 2009

Advocates Plant Seeds for Locally Grown Food

The movers and shakers of Victory Garden BLITZ

During World War II Eleanor Roosevelt encouraged Americans to plant Victory Gardens. The First Lady planted hers at the White House and some 20 million Americans followed her lead. They hoped to conserve fuel for the war effort and make sure there was enough food to go around.

Now a grassroots movement is spreading around the country to rekindle the tradition. Over the weekend a group of Milwaukee area residents will help plant vegetable beds in yards and shared spaces. It’s called the Victory Garden Blitz. WUWM’s Susan Bence got in on the group’s first planning meeting and has been watching its momentum grow.

Gretchen Mead calls herself a food activist.

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