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Project Milwaukee
10:38 am
Mon November 17, 2008

Economics of Aging

Keith Bender is an associate professor of economics at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee who specializes in the economics of aging. He discusses with Lake Effect’s Mitch Teich the economic realities of living longer.

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Project Milwaukee
10:35 am
Mon November 17, 2008

Medical Homes

Dr. Shaili Jain is a psychiatrist with Aurora Behavioral Health Services, a professor of psychiatry at the Medical College of Wisconsin, and a regular contributor to Lake Effect. She wrote a book about the relationship between physicians and drug companies, and she maintains a website about doctors’ bedside manners. She tells Mitch Teich about a new model, called the Medical Home Model, which seeks to address both the primary care shortage- and the issue of coordinating care among a patient’s continuum of providers.

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Project Milwaukee
10:33 am
Mon November 17, 2008

Judy Steininger Will Not Go Gently

Lake Effect contributor Judy Steininger is a Professor Emerita at the Milwaukee School of Engineering, where she teaches chemistry and literature classes. In her personal essay, she is thinking aloud about the end result of aging, and what it means for the here and now.

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Project Milwaukee
10:31 am
Mon November 17, 2008

Geriatricians Ease Growing Pains

Bob Merino

Doctors who treat older people are in high demand these days and with an aging population that trend is expected to grow. As part of our Project Milwaukee series on aging and wellness, WUWM’s LaToya Dennis examines the role geriatricians play in the lives of their patients.

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Project Milwaukee
10:27 am
Fri November 14, 2008

Julie Rovner on Policy

Julie Rovner is NPR’s national health policy correspondent. She’s also the author of Health Care Politics and Policy A to Z, now in its third edition, published by CQ Press. She joined us on the line from NPR in Washington. Rovner tells Lake Effect’s Mitch Teich that the last time there was a concerted health care reform effort in this country - in 1993 - there was also a Democratic Congress and a new Democratic president. But she says circumstances have changed a lot since then.

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Project Milwaukee
10:25 am
Fri November 14, 2008

Patrick Flaherty on Policy, Too

Patrick Flaherty is the Wisconsin Coordinator of the national health care advocacy group Healthcare United. He was a candidate for the Milwaukee Common Council earlier this year. He spoke with Dan Harmon the health care landscape and some options for reform.

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Project Milwaukee
10:22 am
Fri November 14, 2008

Barack Obama Makes Me Feel Old

Liam Callanan is a regular Lake Effect contributor and an author. He also teaches creative writing as an associate professor of English at UW-Milwaukee. In his personal essay for the Wise Today, Well Tomorrow mini series, he says that the new president makes him feel old.

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Project Milwaukee
10:19 am
Fri November 14, 2008

Thinking Ahead

Next week, WUWM will present a series on aging and wellness. We’ll explore how people can best position themselves to live long, healthy lives. As a kick-off, we asked our colleagues if they’re on the right track. We sampled our co-workers at WUWM, asking if they're think ahead and planning for life in their 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond.

If they are any indication of the general population, people are thinking ahead and paying keen attention to the older crowd. We start with two voices you hear frequently on WUWM, Susan Bence and Mitch Teich.

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Arts & Culture
8:12 am
Tue October 7, 2008

She Aint Heavy

Not content with just carrying their wives across the threshold upon getting married, some couples in northern Wisconsin revisit this momentous occasion by carrying their wives in the second annual Wife Carrying Competition in Minocqua.

WUWM's Susan Bence documents the fun in this feature story.

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Baseball
1:13 pm
Fri September 12, 2008

Efforts to Get Black Kids Back to Baseball

Kids play their final T-Ball game of the season on Milwaukee's north side.

The Milwaukee Brewers have one of the best records in baseball this season and could make the playoffs for the first time in a quarter-century. What also makes the team noteworthy is that it has more African American players than most other teams. While Major League Baseball has spent $20 million trying to keep the sport alive in inner cities -- and likes to recall the days of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier -- interest among black children seems to have dwindled. But WUWM’s Erin Toner found players and supporters in Milwaukee working to reverse the trend.

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