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LaToya Dennis

Big changes to Wisconsin’s welfare system could be afoot.

On Tuesday, Gov. Walker announced that his budget will put work requirements in place, for able-bodied recipients with school-aged kids. Walker says his proposals get back to the very nature of what former Gov. Tommy Thompson had in mind, when he overhauled the state’s welfare program in the 1990s.

Mario Tama / Getty Images

Over the weekend, people on every continent took to the streets to protest the inauguration of President Donald Trump, and support those they say they fear will be marginalized under his administration.

By some estimates, more than 3 million people were involved in the protests which sprouted up in cities across the nation, including several here in Wisconsin.

But many chose to go to our nation's capital by plane, train or automobile. And among them were many marchers from Milwaukee.

Impact Sounds / Flickr

From walkabouts to bar or bat mitzvahs to sweet sixteen parties, many cultures have rites of passage into adulthood. For Latin American cultures around the world, including here in Milwaukee, the quinceañera is the most important event in a young woman’s life.

T Ehlinger

The Trump team seems to have followed Wisconsin’s lead. The Walker administration eliminated the words climate change from both the DNR's website and the Public Service Commission's website.

Then shortly after Donald Trump became president, the White House website no longer mentioned climate change.

Scott Manley of Wisconsin Manufacturing and Commerce has no problem with wiping the term from all government vocabulary.

In the last episode of Radio Chipstone, contributor Gianofer Fields introduced us to a young woman named Ashley Kuehl.

Kuehl inherited two pieces of ruby red, hand blown glass from her grandmother and was curious to learn more about them. She knew that the glass was purchased in the Sixties, maybe in Pennsylvania. In this episode of Radio Chipstone Fields calls on reinforcements to solve the puzzle:

Essay: Stuff a Sock In It

Jan 21, 2017
durantelallera / Fotolia

If you were an alien on vacation to earth, you’d be forgiven for thinking humans never shut up. We talk all the time: right here on radio and on television, on our smartphones, to each other.

Like most of us, Lake Effect essayist Joanne Weintraub is guilty of talking too much. But she’s trying to cut it out:

The beginning of a new year has most of us thinking about ways to improve our lives. Whether it’s losing weight, learning something new, getting in shape, or decluttering our homes, January seems to be the time we strive to make things better.

Classical musicians aren’t immune to that impulse. Cellist Robert Cohen chats with us each month in a series we call On That Note, and he’s been thinking about well-being:

Robert Cohen is the cellist for the Milwaukee-based Fine Arts Quartet and his On That Note segments are a regular Lake Effect feature.

Art Montes

This is a weekend that will go down in history. There are heightened emotions across the country, some celebratory and millions of others are taking to the streets to march in solidarity. They will march with women, with immigrants and people of color, with Muslims and the LGBTQ community, for every person at risk of losing their healthcare and so much more.  However you feel about the next four years, becoming an active and informed citizen has never been more important than it is now.

Marti Mikkelson

People were cheering and clinking champagne glasses Friday morning in Waukesha County, as Donald Trump was sworn-in as the nation’s 45th president. We caught up with Republicans in Delafield as they watched the inauguration ceremony unfold.

About 25 Trump supporters gathered for a watch party at the Delafield Brewhaus. They let out a holler when the oath of office ended. After the inaugural address, the partygoers helped themselves to a buffet.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Donald Trump has been sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. Below is the transcript of President Trump's inaugural address as well as notes and analysis from NPR reporters and editors.

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Some Republicans from Wisconsin are excited that they will get to witness Donald Trump being sworn-in today as the nation’s 45th president. We caught up with several local GOP activists who have arrived in Washington.

It’s not the first presidential Inauguration for Mary Buestrin of Mequon. In fact, she’s travelled to Washington for three others.

Photo courtesy of Department of Special Collections and University Archives, Marquette University Libraries

Dick Enberg retired last fall from a sixty-year career as a sports broadcaster.  In that time, he covered eight Super Bowls, tennis's Grand Slam events, and thousands of baseball and basketball games.  Enberg worked with scores of fellow broadcasters, from Merlin Olsen to Joe Morgan to Bud Collins.  But of all the people he shared a broadcast booth, one rises to the top.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Follow NPR's live blog of Inauguration Day for news highlights, analysis, photos and videos from Washington, D.C., throughout the day.

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WUWM Susan Bence

What do you want President-elect Donald Trump to know about you and your community?

WUWM, WPR and NPR asked that question during its A Nation Engaged community conversation Wednesday, January 11 at The Back Room @ Colectivo Coffee in Milwaukee.

NPR Political Correspondent Don Gonyea moderated a panel and took comments and questions from the audience, with the help of WUWM's Mitch Teich, executive producer of Lake Effect, and WPR's Kyla Calvert Mason.

The panel included:

Renaissance Theaterworks

Since its inception, Renaissance Theaterworks has specialized in productions that pay particular attention to women writers, cast and crew.  Luna Gale, their newest offering opening Friday night, is no exception.

Written by Rebecca Gilman and directed by Mary McDonald-Kerr, the play explores a basic question - who decides who is best able to raise a child?

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