News

Art Montes

How do you identify yourself? Are you a middle-aged disabled woman; a working single mother; a transgendered project manager; a social justice activist? Maybe you are several of these identities. Have you ever considered how the boxes we check to identify ourselves can both empower and imprison us?

This week we have two powerful stories about identity and the boxes we assign to others and ourselves.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Jacqui Patterson works in communities around the country to engage African-Americans on climate issues. She directs the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program and helped build the program from the ground up.

U.S. Congress

Millions of Americans will experience major changes to their health coverage if both chambers of Congress pass the Republican health care bill that's currently under consideration in the House of Representatives.

A Milwaukee Judge's Perspective on Segregation

Mar 10, 2017
Andy Dean / Fotolia

Merriam-Webster defines the word “segregate” in two ways: “to separate or set apart from others or from the general mass,” and “to cause or force the separation of (as from the rest of society).” It defines “segregation” as the act of segregating; it gives a secondary definition of “segregation” as “the separation or isolation of a race, class or ethnic group by enforced of voluntary residence in a restricted area . . . .”

Susan Bence

WUWM has been taking a comprehensive look at some of the many issues caused by segregation in Milwaukee through our series, ​Project Milwaukee: Segregation MattersBetween reports on WUWM news and interviews on Lake Effect, we have looked at how segregation can be quantified, how it's perpetuated, and its costs and effects on the community.

Pat Rabinson

Milwaukee Water Commons was created four years ago to educate the community about water - its rivers, streams and Lake Michigan - to cultivate informed stewards.

“I came from a more traditional environmental effort, which was the Milwaukee River Greenway Coalition – working to make the river more beautiful, more accessible. There was already a ton of passion around that issue, but it was by and large a middle class and white group of people,” founder Ann Brummitt says.

arinahabich / Fotolia

There are many neighborhoods in Milwaukee that lack easy access to grocery stores. Near West Side Partners and Marquette University have launched The Grocery Challenge to seek solutions.

Jessi Paetzke

A number of reports surfaced this week that White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus is being met with dissent in the executive office. Some White House staff members dispute that report.

What seems indisputable is that he was not always seen as a likely candidate for national political fame. 

David Flowers

Milwaukee native Davita Flowers-Shanklin brings a unique experience to the discussion of segregation, and its ripple effects.

“I remember being in high school and being really into science and biology. I was the co-director of Camp Everytown, which is a diversity camp for teenagers," Flowers-Shanklin says. "So my work even as a teenager was around anti-oppression."

Michelle Maternowski

Segregation comes with borders, whether they are manmade - 124th Street, the dividing line between Milwaukee and Waukesha counties, or natural - the Milwaukee River. Today, WUWM reports on one particular border, and how some people feel about crossing it.

Metro Milwaukee has a segregation problem. It's an issue prominently on display within area schools.

Some say, school segregation in Milwaukee as bad today as it was 60 years ago, at the height of the Civil Rights era.

How did we get here? Let’s take a look back...

Micaela Martin

Gov. Walker says his administration will aid the Jewish Community Center in Whitefish Bay to make sure that it remains a safe place. The center has been the target of three bomb threats since the start of the year, including one this week. Similar threats have been made against other Jewish organizations nationwide.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke has signed a letter of intent to take part in the federal government's 287(g) Task Force/Jail Enforcement program. It trains local law enforcement and then gives it authority to enforce immigration violations.

According to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, it currently partners with 37 law enforcement agencies in 16 states.

Clarke released his announcement Wednesday afternoon via a web post.

Jim Moy for Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers

Segregation can impact a person's body, mind and health. Not everyone has the same opportunity to be healthy in a city like Milwaukee.

Dr. Julie Schuller says the lack of access to quality healthcare and environmental factors inhibit segregated African-American and Latino populations from living healthy lifestyles.

Courtesy of UWM, David Pate

The road to modern segregation has been a long one. "There's been 350 years of segregation in our country that was perpetuated by the government as well as by the social norms, based on race in particular," says David Pate

Pate studies the complex causes, effects and potential solutions of segregation in his role as an associate professor of social work at the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare at UW-Milwaukee. He says that after centuries of segregation, it's become normalized.  

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