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Are you craving samosas? Do you need a place to wear a sari from your extensive collection? Or have you never eaten a samosa, and you don’t know what a sari is?

Whatever category you may fall in, the organizers of IndiaFest hope you come out to its fifth annual event at Humboldt Park in Bay View on Saturday, August 19, to celebrate, learn about, and experience Indian culture. The day-long festival combines food, music, and other performances.

Penguin Random House

The country of Ireland has inspired countless songs, poems, books, and many other creative reflections. For author Kathleen Anne Kenney, her affinity for Ireland grew stronger after visiting the lands that inspired her novel – Girl on the Leeside.

There’s a lot of talk about the violence that affects urban America: drive-by shootings, carjackings, and other crime that continue to affect the fabric of this country. But very little of that violence has the sectarian underpinnings of the time known as “The Troubles,” which plagued the Northern Ireland city of Belfast for three decades starting in 1969.

Marti Mikkelson

Mayor Tom Barrett said an increase to Milwaukee’s sales tax is necessary to balance a tight city budget. While previewing city budget challenges Tuesday night, he told about 100 people at the Zeidler Municipal Building that the city faces a dire budget situation for 2018, and called the current fiscal model unsustainable. 

Barrett said in the past few years, pension costs that the city pays to retirees have skyrocketed while the state has cut back on shared revenue payments to municipalities.

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Should Wisconsin be the only state making a major investment in the proposed Foxconn factory? Wisconsin U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson asked that question on Tuesday at a Rotary Club appearance in Milwaukee.

The Republican businessman says the huge plant in far southeastern Wisconsin likely would provide jobs for many Illinois residents. As a result, Johnson suggested that perhaps Illinois should share the burden that Gov. Scott Walker wants Wisconsin to take on in order to ensure Foxconn build its plant here.

People around the country are continuing to react with anger and horror to the events that took place at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

It was at this time last year that racial tensions bubbled to the surface in Milwaukee. The violence that erupted in Sherman Park following a police shooting put the challenges of Milwaukee’s black-white relations front and center for the world to see. 

Milwaukee has become known for its segregation, the racial, ethnic and class dividing lines that keep people from living and interacting with each other. But what about spaces of integration? Do they exist and, if so, what can we learn from them?

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So-called “White Nationalists” demonstrating in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend told reporters they felt emboldened by the election of Donald Trump last fall, and his calls to “take America back.”

Lake Effect essayist Jim Spangler has been thinking about the America to which some would like to return:

There is much talk these days about what old timers call the “good old days.” Now all that has been coopted by some fellow in Washington D.C. as “Make America Great Again.”

Maayan Silver

The Milwaukee lakefront is the place to be, especially in summer. Maybe it's the Calatrava, the pontoon boats at the lagoon, the sunsets in Lake Shore Park, or the rental surrey bikes that get you down there.

Increasingly, people-watching and just being near the lakefront's diverse visitors has become a draw. 

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Foxconn’s plans to build a huge LCD screen manufacturing facility in southeastern Wisconsin are another step closer to reality. On Monday, an Assembly committee voted in favor of a $3 billion tax incentives package to lure the company here.

Gov. Walker and fellow Republicans are pushing for the deal. Democrats on the committee pushed for nearly two dozen amendments in an effort to soften the burden on taxpayers. But, all of them failed.

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“Every good story starts with a bad decision” is the premise behind Roxi Copland's new album.

In 2016, singer-songwriter was named Wisconsin jazz musician of the year. However, her latest release is an album of original songs - with a definite Americana/pop sound - called Bad Decision.

Kevin J. Miyazaki / PLATE

In preparation for your next Taco Tuesday, dining critic Ann Christenson wrote the cover story on the best tacos in town in the August issue of Milwaukee Magazine. She explains that what we’re talking about here is tacos - not, strictly speaking, Mexican food.

"For better or worse, if you take a flour or corn tortilla and put some really delicious ingredients inside, wrap it up....it is a different form of sandwich," she explains.

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The State Assembly Committee on Jobs and the Economy will vote Monday afternoon whether to give Foxconn $3 billion in incentives.

Supporters say the huge factory would result in thousands of jobs and a significant boost to the state’s economy. Critics say the bill comes at too high a price - in terms of dollars and its environmental impacts.

Marti Mikkelson

Efforts to connect people to jobs on Milwaukee’s north side jumped into high gear a year ago, after the unrest that broke out in the Sherman Park neighborhood.

It followed a police officer’s fatal shooting of a black man, Sylville Smith. Some people joined the protests, to also raise concerns about jobs and economic opportunity. After the dust settled, community leaders called for an end to the persistent unemployment that has plagued the north side.

WUWM examines the job outlook for the area one year later.

Bonnie Petrie

Violence erupted in the Sherman Park neighborhood a year ago – after a Milwaukee police officer fatally shot an armed suspect. The outburst was partly the result of frustration over stubborn issues that have been plaguing the central city. Among the top concerns – jobs. The incident prompted Gov. Walker to commit $4.5 million to help employ people from central city neighborhoods.

Milwaukee’s unemployment rate has declined from 6.5 percent to five percent in the year since the Sherman Park unrest, according to the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development.

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