Jim Denham / Flickr

Just by virtue of its title, it’s easy to figure out that Milwaukee Magazine focuses on this city we call home.  But even with that as their monthly thrust, the October issue seems to delve especially closely into the soul of Milwaukee as the magazine set out to explore the fifty reasons we love Milwaukee.

From mustard tastings to social justice, associate editor Claire Hanan gave a preview of some of the things and the people that made the list:

Cremona, Italy is the home of Antonio Stradivari, possibly the greatest maker of musical instruments in history. With more than two hundred violin makers living in the small picturesque town, it would make sense that cellist Robert Cohen would find himself there.

"Every restaurant, every hotel, every shop window has violins in it, has instruments of all sorts. It's one of the few places in the world you can walk around with a cello and nobody asks you, 'what is that?'" Cohen says.

Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Violence has cropped up again in the Middle East in recent days, as Russia has carried out military strikes against ISIS, which opposes of Syria's ruling regime. ISIS also opposes the United States, so you might assume our government would be in favor of those military strikes. But as with everything involving the Middle East, the reality is a lot more complex.

Art Montes

Films—local, national, international. Professional panels, audience discussions, premiere parties and pure talent. The 2015 Milwaukee Film Festival, or MFF, has brought the best of film to our beloved city.

Monika Kørra, of Norway, was a student at Southern Methodist University in Texas a few years ago. She competed as an elite-level track athlete, but her life took a major turn when she was kidnapped leaving a party and brutally gang raped.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, 74% of rapes are never reported and 15 out of 16 rapists never go to jail. Fortunately in Kørra's case, all three men were found and arrested within a week of her attack.

Acacia Theatre Company /

We’ve probably all wondered what we might talk about if a compelling figure from history dropped by for coffee, and Acacia Theatre's latest production puts two historical figures together for one last conversation.

Freud’s Last Session envisions a meeting between Sigmund Freud, the father of much of contemporary psychology; and the writer C.S. Lewis.  The two were actually contemporaries, but never met in real life.

Bruce Springsteen has performed quite a few concerts in Milwaukee over the years, but none of them quite compare to his first.

Today marks the 40th anniversary of that show at the old Uptown Theater, a show that became known as the “bomb scare” concert. 

There are lots of Milwaukeeans who still remember that show, but none that had the view of our own Bob Reitman, who was the stage emcee for the "greatest rock and roll show (he had) ever seen."

Gov. Scott Walker will soon appoint a judge to serve out the remainder of Justice Patrick Crook’s term on the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Crooks died unexpectedly last month, just days after announcing he would not seek re-election in 2016. His death leaves Gov. Walker with the decision of whether to appoint one of the candidates to the court.

While it doesn’t happen often in Wisconsin, a governor appointing a state Supreme Court Justice isn’t unheard of. For instance, Marquette Law Professor Janine Geske was first seated on the court by former Gov. Tommy Thompson.

S Bence

Some educators in northern Wisconsin aren't letting the fact that climate change is a politically charged issue sway them from teaching about the subject.

Cathy Techtmann is among them. The UW-Extension environmental outreach specialist decided it was time to rethink climate change education.

“The old model purely based on science were just not resonating with people,” Techtmann says. “A lot of people realize that there’s cultural component, not just a scientific piece but also a cultural piece that makes the issue come alive to people.”

Dave Schumaker / Flickr

Three recent earthquakes of magnitude 4.0 or greater have shook parts of the American west in the last couple of weeks, and several temblors hit Jamaica over the weekend as well. However, those events were relatively mild compared to the recent spate of major earthquakes in places like Japan.