News

Ex Fabula: Water

14 hours ago
Art Montes / Ex Fabula

Humans are 50% water. The Earth is 70% water. As Milwaukeeans the water is part of our identity; Milwaukee - a great place on a great lake. It’s no wonder why our February StorySlam theme is Water. Not only are we excited to honor and celebrate stories of Water, and those who work to sustain it, but get to do so for our first time at Lakefront Brewery! Even more exciting, event partner Reflo Sustainable Water Solutions will unveil Water Story MKE a free app developed by Reflo in collaboration with Ex Fabula to reveal the water stories hidden in plain sight throughout Milwaukee.

Around 1:00 Friday afternoon, multiple shots were fired into the Milwaukee fire station at 2901 N. 30 Street. The bullets did not strike anyone, but the Milwaukee Fire Dept. has closed the station and is moving the engine company to the fire house at 13th and Reservoir.

According to Alderman Bob Donovan, at least six shots pierced the station - which he says is the busiest in the state. Donovan says he hopes the impact on response times is minimal.

Police continue investigating. 

A Syrian refugee living in Dane County filed a lawsuit this month against President Trump's now-stalled travel ban. The U.S. granted the man asylum because soldiers in Syria had imprisoned and tortured him, but his wife and three-year-old daughter remained behind, in Aleppo. He had applied for his family to join him but said the Trump ban halted the procedure, so he sued.

Museum of Wisconsin Art 2011-213

Even non-art historians might be aware that the artist Georgia O’Keeffe was born and started her painting career in Wisconsin, before moving on to do some of her most famous work in New Mexico.  But another artist did the same thing, though his name is not nearly as well-known.

Michelle Maternowski

Anyone who grew up in Milwaukee or who lived here before 2005 may remember a pungent yeast smell in the Menomonee Valley, around I-94. 

Listener Dan Dickover of Bay View was one of those people. He moved to the city in 1997, and asked Bubbler Talk: "For the last few years I haven’t really smelled that smell anymore, so I was wondering why that is.” 

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Today is Carrie Lewis’ last day on the job she has held for 20 years.

She arrived, not long after one crisis surfaced, and she’s leaving, as Milwaukee Water Works is addressing another - figuring out how to replace what could be more than 80,000 lead pipes that carry water into city homes.

Lewis came to town in 1995, two years after Milwaukee’s devastating cryptosporidium outbreak. It sickened hundreds of thousands of water drinkers, and dozens, many of whom had compromised immune systems, died.

Rachel Morello

If you think about it, an election is sort of like a job interview: candidates present their ideas, hoping the public will hire them.

The three men campaigning to be Wisconsin’s superintendent are nearing the end of the “first round interview,” ahead of next week’s primary.

But rather than surveying voters, we assembled a “hiring committee” – of students!

Ingrid Taylar / Flickr

Foreign policy and trade agreements have taken center stage in the Trump administration, but it remains unclear how the President’s rhetoric will translate to action.

In one of his first executive orders after the inauguration, Donald Trump withdrew the United States from negotiations over the TPP - also known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The proposed trade agreement was used by both Democrats and Republicans during the campaign, as a proxy for the pitfalls of globalization.

MilMag Live! Recap: Who the Hell Are We? We Have Some Ideas

Feb 16, 2017
Moriah Bame / Milwaukee Magazine

“Go use a urinal and you’re using Milwaukee-made water technology.” This was Richard Meeusen’s opening assertion at the Feb. 13 MilMag Live! event, Branding MKE: Who the Hell Are We?

LaToya Dennis

Restaurants that allow you to pay what you think a meal is worth are popping up around the country.

The pay-what-you-want concept isn’t new. Now, some owners are using it as a way to help feed low-income people in their cities. 

For people living in poverty, going out to dinner is a luxury. Christie Melby-Gibbons thinks dining out should be available for low income people as well as those who can afford to pay. She recently opened the Tricklebee Café.

“I have just always felt like everybody deserves to eat healthy, delicious, freshly made food,” Gibbons says.

In the days following last summer's unrest in the Sherman Park neighborhood, WUWM met Jay Holmes, a man hoping to help heal his community by creating a mobile fresh food market. Six months later, Holmes talks about the changes he’s noticed. He describes both frustrations and bright spots.

The U.S. House has voted to scrap a recent Dept. of Labor regulation, to the delight of Governor Scott Walker. For some time, he has wanted Wisconsin to drug test laid-off workers who apply for unemployment insurance, but Walker says the Obama administration set narrow circumstances in which states can drug test UI applicants, such as, if the person's occupation requires a firearm.

Nathaniel Davauer / Courtesy of Milwaukee Ballet

Later this week, three world premiere ballet performances will debut on the stage of Milwaukee’s Pabst Theater. The Genesis performances are the results of a competition for choreographers on the rise.

Choreographers submitted samples of their work, and Michael Pink, the Milwaukee Ballet’s artistic director, chose three finalists, who each have three weeks to create a new work for Milwaukee Ballet’s dancers whose names have been chosen at random.

Brickboys/Splunge Comunications

A few years ago, we introduced you to the authors of a project to chronicle the oral history of Milwaukee’s punk and alternative music scene.  The interviews from that project, called “The Cease is Increase” have now yielded a new book that builds on Steve Nodine's earlier publication.

Next week, Wisconsin voters will narrow the field of candidates for state Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Three men are vying for the job.

So, let’s get to know them.

Tony Evers says his work is a long way from finished.

“Have we solved every problem? Absolutely not,” says Evers, who has led Wisconsin schools for the last eight years. “We still need to make sure that we bring people together.”

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