News

Courtesy of the Milwaukee Bucks

After weeks of back and forth, GOP leaders on Wednesday announced a budget deal.

Three issues had been the cause for an impasse—a new Bucks arena in Milwaukee, prevailing wage legislation and transportation borrowing.

Republicans now say that the state’s budget committee will vote on including $500 million in bonding for transportation projects, with the possibility of another $350 million if Joint Finance deem the projects necessary. Some projects, including the north leg of the Zoo Interchange reconstruction, will be put on hold.

Presidential campaigns won’t be the only ones vying for voters’ attention as next year’s elections grow near. The other campaign that will gain steam is the race to prepare people for Wisconsin’s photo ID law.

The law will require voters to present government-issued identification at the polls.

This past spring, the U.S. Supreme Court ended the legal challenges to the law.

That’s caused groups that fought the requirement to shift gears.

Survey of the Health of Wisconsin

Since 2008, the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health has been conducting surveys on the health of Wisconsin citizens.

Survey of the Health of Wisconsin, or SHOW, explores individual health behaviors and choices, collects physical measurements, biological samples and considers healthy and unhealthy features of Wisconsin neighborhoods. SHOW is expanding its surveying radius by 10 new counties over the next two years, including into Milwaukee County.

Although UW-Milwaukee's Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health is still in its fledgling stages, the school has already begun to make a difference.

Now the school is starting the process of looking for new leadership. After leading the school through its formative years, founding Dean Magda Peck is stepping down July 1. 

bus
Michelle Maternowski

It appears all-day federal mediation on Tuesday failed to break the contract impasse between union bus drivers and the Milwaukee County Transit System. So the drivers plan to walk off the job at three o'clock Wednesday morning, after buses transport thousands of people who ride to Summerfest.

On Monday, members of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 998 rejected the latest contract offer from the transit system. Union leaders say members particularly oppose the system's desire to hire part-time drivers.

Courtesy of Bill Singleton

Where there’s a lot of gun violence, there are a lot of cops. Milwaukee’s police Chief Edward Flynn describes this as a data driven approach to policing.

In these neighborhoods, teens frequently encounter the police. And the Milwaukee Police have recognized that these interactions aren’t great -­ partly because of a lack of mutual understanding.

The STOP program, or Student Talking it Over with Police, is MPD’s attempt at repairing community relationships by meeting with kids in the classroom.

Essay: Alarm Bells

23 hours ago
Vic / Flickr

Patients often judge their doctors on their bedside manner.  But doctors also pay attention to how well they get along with their patients. But as Lake Effect essayist Dr. Bruce Campbell explains, it’s for reasons patients might not realize:

He is the happiest person in my medical practice, and every visit is full of his non-stop banter.  As soon as I walk in the room, he is off  and running.

Wisconsin's State Capitol
Ann Althouse, Flickr

One of Wisconsin’s legislative leaders seems to want to shake his Republican colleagues into action. The Legislature has been at an impasse for weeks over the state budget. 

Milwaukee Crowds Gather to Watch Women's World Cup

Jun 30, 2015
Rachel Maidl

Soccer bars in town may be crowded Tuesday evening, to watch the U. S. meet Germany in the semi-finals of Women’s World Cup. Germany is the top-ranked team.

Peter Marshall, owner of Jack’s American Pub on Brady Street, is expecting plenty of customers but admits soccer fans are more passionate in his native Manchester.

“It tends to be more fair-weather fans in America, which is fine, because it’s good that people are getting on board for it, but it’s for big events mostly.”

Jason Eppink / Flickr

With funerals underway this week in Charleston, South Carolina for the nine victims of a shooting at a historic black church, emotions of sorrow and outrage have spread across the world. Although most of that outrage is directed at the shooter himself, a professed white supremacist, it has grown to encompass South Carolina's state government.

Despite being removed by a protestor a few days ago, state law still calls for the Confederate flag to fly over South Carolina's Statehouse. 

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