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trapperschoepp.com

We got to know Trapper Schoepp when he interned for Lake Effect in his freshman year at UW-Milwaukee. He stayed with us as an intern throughout his entire academic career, all the while writing songs and performing in ever more famous circles. In 2012 he released his debut album Run, Engine, Run.

Paul Ruffolo

About 10 years ago, actor and director Michael Coty founded Youngblood Theatre to give himself and his fellow UWM Theatre graduates a chance to do professional work and take creative risks.

Over the years, Cotey acted for other companies in town and continued to direct with Youngblood, before taking a break to go to grad school for directing - a move inspired by his experience directing theater outside of Milwaukee. 

Maayan Silver

The tang of a freshly picked tomato, the crunch and sweetness of a recently harvested carrot, the crisp floral flavor of a just-picked cucumber. Chef Dave Swanson wants to facilitate restaurant-goers' ability to taste these items, and pretty much anything else that can be produced or foraged in Wisconsin.

John Sturdy / Milwaukee Magazine

Milwaukee is known as the most segregated city in America. But often, that designation raises more questions than it answers. 

Growing up in Milwaukee, Reggie Jackson saw the signs of segregation all around him, even when he didn't recognize them. Going to public schools in the city, Jackson says he didn't have class with any white students until he started commuting to high school, a subject-specific school on the south side of town.

Theo Wargo / Getty Images Entertainment

On Tuesday evening, the BMO Harris Pavilion on the Summerfest grounds will be home to the Celtic punk stylings of the Dropkick Murphys. For the past couple of decades, the Boston-based band has gained a worldwide following particularly for their live shows - which draw large and enthusiastic crowds.

Wolfgang Gauch

Cellist Robert Cohen joins us every month to talk about the life of working classical musician for the segment: On That Note with Robert Cohen.

This month, Robert is preparing for a series of concerts and is revisiting a piece of music he hasn’t played in a long time. And as it turns out it's an interesting process.

"I'm playing a piece that I haven't played for at least 25 years...and it's really fascinating coming back to kind of re-learn a piece that I've barely even thought about for all of that time," says Cohen.

Brittnie Peck

Towering Pines Camp For Boys came to life in 1945. As environmental awareness was on the rise in the 1970s, the northern Wisconsin camp pioneered an environmental immersion program that garnered national attention.

They call it acclimatization.

The campers merge with the natural world – in some unconventional ways. For instance, camp leaders teach the kids what it feels like to navigate the world like a raccoon.

LaToya Dennis

Across the country, Black Panther Parties are once again becoming more active. The organization was founded in the 1960s and was known for its militant self-defense and community-based programs. In Milwaukee, there are currently two active groups. WUWM's LaToya Dennis went out with one, called the Original Black Panthers of Milwaukee, to learn about its mission.

michaelianblack.org

If you love comedy, it’s a great weekend to be in Brew City, for this weekend marks the 12th anniversary of the Milwaukee Comedy Festival. And it gets even better, if you’re a fan of the Wet Hot American Summer film and Netflix series. For not only did the new season just start streaming, but one of its stars will be in town this Sunday, headlining the comedy festival: Michael Ian Black.

Art Montes / Ex Fabula

Hello August! While many of you are beginning back-to-school preparations and others are just excited about State Fair, we at Ex Fabula are excited to announce that applications for the Season 9 Ex Fabula Fellowship program are now open. Ex Fabula Fellows are community members who use personal stories to inspire community-led dialogue around some of the most pressing issues in the Greater Milwaukee area – segregation and economic and racial inequality.

MPTV

Music can represent a generation or even a social movement. 

Matt Mixon was born in 1951 and spent his formative years living in Milwaukee's central city. As a teen, his family moved to the north side. As he dealt with his own personal transition, the rest of the country dealt with a broader transition to equal justice. Racial tensions were high, and the city was on the brink of something big.  Mixon describes his experiences and observations as a young man during the years surrounding the Milwaukee Riot of 1967:

Amanda Becker

This weekend marks the fifth anniversary of the fatal shooting at the Sikh Temple in Oak Creek. A Gunman entered the facility on a sunny Sunday morning, killing six worshippers and injuring several others. The event left deep scars on local Sikhs, and touched many others as well.

On a recent Sunday Morning, Sikhs at the temple reflected on how the day of the shooting changed their lives. Pardeep Kaleka lost his father, Temple President Satwant Singh Kaleka, in the tragedy. He died trying to protect others as the gunman opened fire.

Althouse

Dozens of people packed into a room at the State Capitol on Thursday for a public hearing on Foxconn’s plans to build a huge plant in southeastern Wisconsin. An Assembly committee heard testimony on a bill that would provide $3 billion in tax incentives for the Taiwanese company.

Susan Bence

As the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative Wednesday announced it would not pursue a lawsuit to stop the City of Waukesha from drawing drinking water from Lake Michigan, other Great Lakes challenges are on the horizon.

The consortium of Great Lakes mayors – representing the U.S. and Canada - believes a balance must to struck to create thriving communities while protecting the Great Lakes.

LaToya Dennis

It’s been nearly one year since unrest in Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood captured the nation's attention.

Police in riot gear were deployed to bring control to the area, where people were damaging police cars and setting buildings afire. What set off the unrest was the fatal police shooting of an African American man.

Yet some who flocked to the neighborhood were there to protest the poverty and joblessness impacting many of the city's residents.

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