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Gov. Scott Walker is strongly hinting that he’ll run for a third term in 2018. Walker swept into office in the tea party wave of 2010, while Republicans took both houses of the Legislature. He dropped jaws when he announced he would gut public unions, then he was able to pass other landmark pieces of legislation, including statewide expansion of voucher schools. But, there are challenges ahead, should he decide to mount another campaign.

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Whether you enjoy holiday traditions, or find them stressful, there’s one thing most people can agree upon this time of the year: we could all use some comic relief.  Luckily for us, we have Comedy Contributor Matt Kemple to ask just where we might find that cup of cheer. He sat down with WUWM's Rachel Owens recently to share his suggestions, and his thoughts on Dave Chappelle's monologue on Saturday Night Live earlier this month.

Michelle Maternowski

At the end of 2016, Precious Lives will shift gears. We’ll wrap up our radio series and focus on a traveling live show. The Precious Lives team will attempt to reach all corners of Milwaukee to harness diverse energies to combat the problem of gun violence.

Performers will bring their stories of gun violence directly into churches, schools, offices and so on.

Michael Brosilow / Milwaukee Rep

For more than four decades, the Milwaukee Rep has presented an annual production of the Dickens classic, A Christmas Carol.  For many of those years, the show has moved from the usual Milwaukee Rep stages to the historic Pabst Theater. This year is no exception.

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Whether you enjoy holiday traditions, or find them stressful, there’s one thing most people can agree upon this time of the year: we could all use some comic relief. Of course, not everyone has it in them to be a stand-up comedian who talks politics. Some of us would be more comfortable being political comedy writers. It’s to those people whom essayist Joel Habush is speaking:

Rachel Morello

In college, students might joke about living on ramen noodles, or popcorn.

But for some, hunger can be a real problem.

According to at least one study, today’s college students suffer higher levels of food insecurity than ever before.

So as a more diverse population of students works toward higher education, some campuses are figuring out how to make sure those young people have meals, including in Milwaukee.

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On this day in 1964, the Spacecraft Mariner 4 was launched into its 228 day mission that would bring the spacecraft within about 6,000 miles of Mars. That mission resulted in the first close-up photos of the Red Planet.

In celebration of that historic mission, November 28th is known as Red Planet Day.

"At first, all we wanted to do was learn more about the environment, but now, of course we want to get [to Mars]. We want to send a person there," says astronomy contributor and director of the Manfred Olson Planetarium at UW-Milwaukee, Jean Creighton.

Wisconsin Officials Work On Timetable For Presidential Election Recount

Nov 28, 2016
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The Wisconsin Elections Commission is holding an emergency phone conference on Monday to establish plans for the state to move forward with a recount of the state's vote tally in this month's presidential election. This will be the state's first presidential recount.

Green Party candidate Jill Stein requested the recount last Friday. She also is expected to ask for recounts in Michigan and Pennsylvania. Stein says the recounts will ensure that the results were not hacked.

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In Wisconsin, thousands of families struggle to pay their bills and put food on the table. One need some of them have – that you might not consider - is diapers.

Many families can’t always afford to keep their babies clean, dry, comfortable and healthy.

People living on the edge in Seymour, Wisconsin, have long been coming to the group Community 2000 for help.

Courtesy of Mark Speltz

There are many images associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement: crowds of people holding signs, policemen attacking children with dogs and fire hoses, or students sitting at lunch counters with jeering crowds behind them.

But nearly all of the photos in popular culture depict incidents that happened in southern states. For many Americans these images form our view of that time period, and frame the fight for civil rights as a largely southern issue.

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Earlier this year, the documentary Gleason made its Milwaukee premiere in a private event. The film tells the heartwrenching story of Steve Gleason, a former NFL player who suffers from ALS.

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In our plugged-in world, we all can forget to take time for face to face conversation. But as our family members age, those conversations about family memories and our shared history become ever more important. Hearing the stories can help us connect with our relatives in a more profound way, and asking the questions can help us understand ourselves better too.

And when it comes time to commemorate the lives of those we’ve lost, those stories become a bridge between the living and the dead.

Mark Makela / Getty Images

Almost three weeks have passed since the Presidential election. News analysts and regular people alike are still trying to assess what transpired on November 8th.

Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says contrary to much public opinion, there was some precedent for the way the electorate swung:

“We have met the enemy and he is us.” The ironic statement is from the durable comic strip “Pogo” by cartoonist Walt Kelly, widely syndicated in newspapers from the late 1940s into the 1970’s.

Art Montes

The holiday season is in full swing. As the months speed by, calendars fill up and to-do lists seem never-ending. It’s easy to become overwhelmed by all the chores, the must-haves and checked boxes. Often, we find ourselves so wrapped-up in our shopping, cooking, and planning, that we forget to take time to just listen. We miss out on the sounds of the moment, as well as the stories told by old friends and new acquaintances alike.

Kim Frank

The cookie book. If you’re a native of Wisconsin, it’s likely you know what we’re talking about. But for those who don’t, it’s a cookie recipe book that We Energies publishes every year—yep, the same We Energies that sends you a bill every month. The utility released its first cookie book way back in 1928. While the book is a crowd favorite, we wanted to know why an energy company is interested in the cookies you make.

At face value, Cathy Schulze admits, it seems a little odd that a power company would publish a recipe book for cookies. But she says not if you know the history.

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