News

Michelle Maternowski

Starting Wednesday, Milwaukee will begin a new strategy to end chronic homelessness. The program is called Housing First. It simply offers chronically-homeless people a place to live. The federal government defines them as individuals who’ve gone without housing for a year straight, or multiple times over three years. Milwaukee has counted about 200 such people. The city and county will work to move them into permanent housing.

Rinka Chung Architecture Inc.

A judge ruled in favor of Milwaukee County on Friday in its lawsuit against Preserve Our Parks. The judge determined a move by the Legislature to redraw lakebed boundaries was legal.

Preserve Our Parks had threatened to sue the County over its proposed sale of the Downtown Transit Center site to developer Rick Barrett. He wants to build the 44-story Couture tower on the property. The building would feature housing, retail and parking space – and a stop for the new streetcar.

While today marks a major victory for gay rights in the U.S., the anniversary of a major moment in gay rights history is this weekend. The infamous Stonewall Inn was the site of a police raid 46 years ago. 

The raid on the bar with a mainly gay and lesbian clientele sparked a riot, which is itself seen as a landmark moment in the history of the LGBT civil rights movement.

Waukesha is one step closer in its quest to obtain Lake Michigan water.

On Wednesday, the Wisconsin DNR gave preliminary approval to the city’s plan. Waukesha’s underground source of water is dwindling and increasingly contaminated with radium, an element linked to cancer. So the city is under a federal order to take action. The final decision about getting water from Lake Michigan does not rest with the DNR.

NASA

Every month, we travel the stars with our astronomy contributor Jean Creighton. Creighton is the director of the Manfred Olson Planetarium on the campus of UW-Milwaukee.

We’ve talked about everything from visible constellations to exoplanets to landing a probe on a comet. Now that it's summer, we are talking about light - star light, infrared light.

Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

As soon as Thursday, the Supreme Court could decide the fate of millions of same-sex couples nationwide. In a ruling covering four cases, the court will determine whether states can prohibit same-sex marriage, as 13 states currently do.

It's always tough to predict how the court will rule but, broadly speaking, there are three main possibilities: the simplest is that the court declares state marriage bans unconstitutional, meaning states will all perform and recognize same-sex marriage. That's a pretty simple outcome, but things get much trickier in the other two cases.

Marti Mikkelson

Gov. Walker came to Milwaukee on Wednesday to loosen Wisconsin’s gun laws. One bill he signed eliminates the state’s 48-hour waiting period for handgun purchases. The other allows retired police officers to carry guns on public school property.

Walker selected the Milwaukee Sheriff’s office for his signing ceremony. He defended the timing of the event, happening just a week after mass shootings in South Carolina. He says the wheels were put in motion weeks ago, before a gunman shot and killed nine worshippers at a church in Charleston.

Ren Kuo / Flickr

As the weather warms up, there's nothing more enjoyable than a cool beverage. Dining contributor Ann Christenson toured the city on a quest to find the best iced coffee and milkshakes Milwaukee has to offer.

Her features on iced coffee and milkshakes can be found in this month's issue of Milwaukee Magazine.

Here are Christenson's five picks of each:

Sean Gallup / Getty Images

The fight against the so-called "Islamic State" movement in the Middle East dominates much of the world news headlines, along with the crises in South Sudan and in Syria. But there are several other international stories that haven't drawn as much attention in the media in this country.

Among them is the looming economic crisis in Greece. Professor of political economy and world business at Carthage College Art Cyr starts his update on foreign policy issues with Greece.

Photos.com

Some state employees are one step closer to receiving pay increases for the 2015-2017 fiscal year while others could bring home less money. The states Joint Committee on Employment Relations voted on two different provision on Tuesday now on their way to the legislature.

Under the plan, state troopers would see a 3 percent raise during both the 2015 and 2016 fiscal years. Gregory Gracz is director of the Office of State Employee Relations. He says the hope is that the raise would reduce turnover within the organization.

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