News

Justin W Kern

    

Wisconsin received disappointing budget news on Wednesday. The Legislative Fiscal Bureau told the state not to expect additional tax revenue to roll in, over the next two years.

State leaders were hoping revenue would exceed expectations, so they could restore some cuts Gov. Walker made in his budget.

kev-shine / Flickr

Depression is a mood disorder that by some estimates seriously affects nearly 15 million Americans a year. 

From cognitive behavior therapy to hypnosis to medication, there are a variety of ways of treating it.

courtesy of The Revomatics

A local band hailing from Milwaukee’s south side is giving surf music a unique update. With their debut album We Come In Peace, The Revomatics have picked up where classic California rock-n-roll left off.

Wisconsin's State Capitol
Ann Althouse, Flickr

State leaders had hoped additional tax money would enable them to restore funding for public schools and reduce a proposed $300 million cut to the UW System.

But, according to projections from the Legislative Fiscal Bureau, there will be no extra revenue over the next two years.

While some might have dreams of breaking earth-shaking news at a magazine like The New Yorker, Mary Norris’s aspirations were different.

Norris initially wanted to be a writer at the iconic literary news and culture magazine, but her first job there was in the archives. It was from there that she saw her dream job across the office on the copy desk, a place where she has remained ever since.

Norris has been with The New Yorker since 1978, the last 22 years as a query proofreader.

pingu2004, fotolia

State lawmakers are considering whether to scrap the prevailing wage law. It requires government to hire workers for certain public projects at a wage that reflects the industry standard.

Lawmakers wrapped up a lengthy Senate committee debate on Tuesday, without acting on the divisive proposal.

Wauwatosa Republican state Sen. Leah Vukmir tried to convince colleagues to repeal the law.

She calls the prevailing wage “anti-competitive” and “anti-free market,” and says after some 80 years on the books, it’s time for change.

Albert Lichtblau

Seventy years ago, three babies were born into desperate circumstances. Their mothers had been sent to almost certain death at the Mauthausen Concentration Camp in German-occupied Austria. Against unlikely odds, they were born and survived the camps along with their mothers.

The camp was liberated 70 years ago by a squad attached to the U.S. Army’s 11th Armoured Division – The Thunderbolts. The squad was led by Sergeant Albert Kosiek.

dpbirds / Flickr

This spring marks the anniversaries of the liberation of five concentration camps by United States forces. Seventy years after World War II's end, the effects and implications from the collective experiences of individuals and countries are still being felt. 

Professor of political economy and world business at Carthage College Art Cyr reflects on the legacy of World War II and how it shapes foreign and global policy today. 

Dave Reid, Flickr

Republican budget leaders say the Wisconsin Senate and Assembly will not advance the part of Gov. Walker's budget that would give the UW System independence from state oversight.

Sen. Alberta Darling and Rep. John Nygren say they also want to restore some of the $300 million Walker would cut from the system's budget, depending on new state revenue projections. The tally on tax collections should be forthcoming soon.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, photo by Rick, Wood/RWOOD@JOURNALSENTINEL.COM

Internet radio show host Homer Blow is part of the Precious Lives radio team. He helps shape the stories about youth and gun violence with his decades of experience living and making radio in Milwaukee.

Blow talks about the violence in Milwaukee all of the time on his show, but the story hit close to home recently.

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