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Adelie Freyja Annabel, Flickr

UW-Milwaukee officials on Monday explained details of a new buyout offer for employees. The plan encourages faculty and staff who are close to retirement to leave early.

The campus stands to lose as much as $40 million in state aid over the next two years, if lawmakers approve Gov. Walker’s budget. One way UWM is looking to deal with the shortfall is through a buyout program.

Chancellor Mark Mone says the university will offer the deal to about 300 of its 4,500 employees.

newaukee.com

You may not be aware of it, but it’s Young Professionals Week in Milwaukee. It’s also Young Professionals Week in seven other cities across the state.

The event’s website describes it as a “weeklong platform for discovery, adventure and meaningful conversations about the issues that matter among young professionals in Wisconsin.”

justasc - Fotolia.com

It’s not often that the wheels of military justice turn outside of military courts. And it’s even less often that the public can watch the proceedings. But thanks to the judicial outreach program of the US Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces, their courtroom is open to any interested party tomorrow in Milwaukee.

Guy Sie / Flickr

High tech things like livestreaming, constant connectivity, and young professionals seem to be a natural fit. But as Lake Effect essayist Ed Makowski points out, not everyone thinks so:

Gov. Walker
Eric Thayer/Getty Images

Former Secretary of State and First Lady Hillary Clinton officially threw her hat into the ring Sunday. Marco Rubio, the Republican freshman senator from Florida, entered the presidential race Monday.

Gov. Walker continues to send strong signals that he’ll run for president, but his announcement may not come for several months.

Uber App

It used to be that if you needed a ride, and public transit was not an option, you called a cab. These days, there are a lot more players in the game—companies like Lyft and Uber.

On Tuesday, the Assembly will vote on proposed statewide regulations for transportation network companies. The rules would supersede local rules, perhaps enabling the industry to expand into more Wisconsin communities.

For many years, Joel Huntley was living the dream. Huntley is a Master Potter and produced works in his ceramics studio in Columbus, Wisconsin. However, when the market turned...Huntley was forced to face reality and close his shop for good. In this edition of It's a Material World, contributor Gianofer Fields met Huntley in the Midwest Ceramics Studio in Madison Wisconsin where he was reintroduced to some old friends:

joshme17/Flickr

You were probably warned as a child to never combine water and electricity. The list of things not to do was impressive – don’t walk outside in a lightning storm, don’t plug in a hair dryer over a sink full of water. Essentially we were told some variation of "keep them far, far apart."

Well, Brooke Mayer didn’t get that message. Or if she did, she ignored it.

Illustrated by Gustaf Tenggren

Many fairy tales have resurfaced in various forms on film, stage, musicals and even operas to appeal to large audience of all ages.

However, the classic fairy tales originally written by Brothers Grimm were gruesome, sexual and slightly violent - a far cry from the sanitized versions of today. The 2015 Cinderella film by Disney excludes pigeons pecking out the stepsister's eyes, and the sisters cutting off their toes and heels in attempt to fit into the glass slipper.

Workman Publishing

The English language is usually a pretty useful tool. Most of us don't have too much trouble finding a word to describe what we're talking about.

But it's a rapidly changing world in which we live, and ideas often come along that defy easy explanation. Like, say, the use of microscopic components to build machines, it's a concept called nanorobotics.

A new book by Lizzie  Skurnick is about neologisms, names for things that didn't have names before.

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