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Civil War
1:52 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Great Lakes Civil War Forum Extends Antietam's Impact Beyond Battlefield

President Lincoln with the soon-to-be-replaced General George McClellan and officers after the Battle of Antietam.
Credit Photo courtesy of LOC

Before the break, we heard the story of the Iron Brigade’s role at the battle of Antietam. It was a group of fights that are commonly remembered as the bloodiest day of battle in American history, and for good reason.

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Civil War
2:24 pm
Sun September 16, 2012

Web Exclusive: The Father of Battlefield Medicine

Jonathan Letterman, the "father of Battlefield Medicine"

One hundred fifty years ago on September 17th, Union and Confederate soldiers met up near Sharpsburg, Maryland by Antietam Creek. The ensuing battle would become known as the bloodiest single day of fighting in American history, claiming 23,000 casualties. It would also mark a turning point in the American Civil War, committing the country to a prolonged and deadly conflict.

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Civil War
2:18 pm
Sun September 16, 2012

Web Exclusive: Rare Images of Antietam Offer Veterans' Look at Battle

Battlefield guide and author Stephen Recker's new book is "Rare Images of Antietam"

By the end of the day on September 17th, 1865, more than 23,000 Union and Confederate soldiers had been killed or wounded. The Battle of Antietam, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, was the bloodiest single day of the American Civil War - and in American history.

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Civil War
2:00 pm
Sun September 16, 2012

Web Exclusive: Clara Barton Transforms Role of Nurse on the Battlefield

The famous Civil War nurse and founder of the American Red Cross Clara Barton
Credit Photo courtesy of the National Park Service

One hundred fifty years later, it's hard to place enough significance on how the American Civil War would go on to shape our country and its people - or to overestimate the extreme loss of life it caused. Beyond the battlefields, however, the War Between the states also brought forth many firsts, such as the first Army ambulance corps, the first use of conscription of soldiers, the first black U.S. Army officer - the list goes on and on.

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Environment
6:34 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Slipping Green into Rock

Rock the Green creator Lindsay Stevens Gardner (right) with director of sponsor and event management Corey Sutton. She's one of 250 volunteers who make the event happen.

Last year in Milwaukee, more than 7,000 people showed up for a new one-day music festival at Veterans Park in the midst of heavy rain and wind.  Organizers would like to think people were drawn to its mission - to create as little waste as possible during a concert.

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Arts & Culture
2:53 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Laurence Juber: Fingerstyle Guitar Virtuoso

Guitar virtuoso Laurence Juber.

Lake Effect's Bonnie North interviews Laurence Juber.

Laurence Juber never intended to a rock and roll star. The London-born guitarist, composer, arranger, and session musician had his sights set on a studio career. And he had a very nice one going in London until he got a fateful call from Sir Paul McCartney and ended up joining Sir Paul’s band Wings in 1979. But that wasn’t the first change in musical direction for Juber. He had studied classical guitar as well as music theory at college, but quickly decided the commercial possibilities were limited.

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Environment
6:22 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

How Does Climate Change Affect the Life Cycle of Plants and Animals?

UWM Distinguished Professor Mark Schwartz (left) and keynote speaker Steven Running of the University of Montana at this week's international conference on phenology hosted by UWM.
Credit Susan Bence

Leading scientists gather in Milwaukee to study the impact of climate on life cycles.

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Environment
12:00 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Community Gardens: Transforming Neighborhoods

Before
Susan Bence

Land trusts are far from new to the American experience. There exists a century-old tradition of private and nonprofit groups preserving land not protected by the government.

A local group - founded a dozen years ago – wields preservation tools with an urban twist – transforming empty lots into urban gardens.

WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence headed out to 49th Street – just west of Washington Park – to see what a group of neighbors have accomplished.

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Environment
12:00 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Hundreds Gather in Milwaukee around the Growing Power of Producing Local Food - Part 2

Leo Grandison and Latrice Jones with daughter Sehai traveled from Santa Cruz CA to attend the Growing Power conference.
Credit Susan Bence

Environmental Reporter Susan Bence joins Ann-Elise Henzl again in the studio.

Over the weekend Susan stopped in at a Urban and Small Farm Conference put together by Milwaukee-based Growing Power.

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Environment
12:00 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Hundreds Gather in Milwaukee around the Growing Power of Producing Local Food

Sundiata Ameh-El (left) and fellow member of the Tallahassee Food Network were among 1500 attendees at the Growing Power urban and small farm conference
Credit Susan Bence

Hundreds of people gathered in Milwaukee last weekend to do more than talk about growing fruits and vegetables.

Growing Power – which for many is synonymous with MacArthur Genius awardee Will Allen – put together dozens of workshops and discussion around making local food accessible across communities – while creating JOBS in the process.
 

WUWM Environmental Reporters Susan Bence joins Ann-Elise Henzl in the studio to talk about three-day conference.

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