News

Rachel Morello

It’s not uncommon to see UW-Madison or UW-Milwaukee named among the nation’s top research universities.

State schools regularly appear on industry-compiled lists. And just last year, UWM joined an elite group of “R1” institutions – schools recognized for their research output.

How do undergrads contribute to the research work their campuses are doing?

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Congress returned to session on Tuesday. One item Republican lawmakers promise to repeal, and in short order, is President Obama’s signature health care law – the Affordable Care Act.

In Wisconsin, the data shows that more than 173,000 people now get their health insurance through the ACA.  With its future in doubt, WUWM asked several providers what they’re advising people who are looking for insurance.

(Photo by Allen Kee / ESPN Images)

The cable sports giant, ESPN, announced in October that it will soon launch a "reimagined version" of the network's signature show, the 5:00PM (Central time) broadcast of SportsCenter.  In the hosts' chairs will be Jemele Hill and Michael Smith, currently co-hosts of "His & Hers" on sister network, ESPN2.

Audrey Nowakowski

Some things are simply meant to go with your favorite morning beverage. Coffee and biscotti, coffee and cookies, coffee and breakfast foods, coffee and….pizza?

Yes, pizza. One Milwaukee company is delivering a unique experience to customers at Anodyne Bay View Café and Pizza.

Brian Smith/U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Northeast Region / American Bird Conservancy/Flickr

“Bird-friendly” coffee might sound like coffee brewed and developed for our feathered friends, but it’s actually a certification for what is more commonly referred to as shade grown coffee. It’s coffee grown using agroforestry, which encourages more biodiversity, including a variety of trees, small mammals and birds.

Doug Bradley, Craig Werner

The Vietnam War marked a turning point in American history. The war took place during a time of turbulent social change – the 1960s and early 70s saw huge strides in women’s rights and civil rights. The country also witnessed the assassinations of a president, a presidential hopeful, a civil rights icon and the killing of unarmed protestors at Kent State by National Guardsmen.

Jacob Cimino, flickr

There is disagreement in Wisconsin over how to handle some Native American burial mounds. At odds are tribal representatives and business owners.

For months, a special state panel has been working on legislation to make everyone happy. Committee members submitted their final votes on Friday.

Justin W Kern

The Wisconsin Legislature gets back into action on Tuesday. All 99 members of the state Assembly will be sworn-in for another two years, while half the state Senate will take the oath of office for new, four-year terms.

Republicans secured even larger majorities in the November elections. The GOP picked up one more seat in the Assembly, increasing their margin 64 to 35, the largest Republican majority in 60 years. They’ve also taken a 20-13 lead in the state Senate, after knocking off Democrat Julie Lassa of Stevens Point.  

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Aldo Leopold’s 1949 book A Sand County Almanac fueled the conservation movement. Estella Leopold, a vibrant nearly nonagenarian, was the youngest of five Leopolds. She grew up happily oblivious of her father’s fame.

Aldo was teaching at UW-Madison in the 1930s, when he bought a shack – quite literally, a ramshackle small barn – fifty miles to the north on what was exhausted farmland.

Estella loved the land.

iconimage / Fotolia

Every time you post to Twitter or Facebook, these sites are collecting data about you. At this point you ought to expect that by participating in social media sites, you’re giving up some of your privacy. It’s just the name of the game.

Some see big data from social media sites as a god send for researchers - a perfect way to study social habits with huge numbers of people. But what happens when that data with your personal details still attached is published for a study, for the world to see?

karelnoppe / Fotolia

The old saying goes that nothing is certain but death and taxes. We can add another certainty to that list: our muscles will weaken and even atrophy as we age, unless we take care of them by strength building and exercise. In other words, you really do need to move it, or you will lose it.

LMspencer / Fotolia

Sean Carroll is the Alan Wilson Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics at UW-Madison, and author of the new book, The Serengeti Rules: The Quest to Discover How Life Works and Why It Matters. His book uses true stories of scientific discovery to explain how scientists connected the dots and came to understand that all of life is interconnected. 

Many people who give back to the community are motivated by causes that touch them, personally. That's the case for Alex Brkich. Because of his experience with his mother, Brkich has made his Wauwatosa restaurant Cranky Al’s friendly to people with Alzheimer’s and other memory loss.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Environmental issues were plentiful this year.  From Waukesha water to a retooled DNR, WUWM looks at a few that will continue to vertebrate in 2017.

Waukesha Water

Waukesha has to replace its well water because it’s tainted with radium. The city built its solution around a daily allotment of about ten million gallons of water from Lake Michigan, and that meant winning permission from the states that border the lake, because Waukesha sits outside its basin.

Friday on Lake Effect: Best of Bubbler Talk

Dec 30, 2016

Friday on Lake Effect

On today’s show, we listen back to the best of Bubbler Talk from the past year, featuring questions submitted by our listeners. Our reporters tackle a diverse array of questions about Milwaukee traditions, interesting geography, or things we pass everyday on the streets. It's a Bubbler Talk mixtape.

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