News

Marge Pitrof

Last week, while President Trump was pulling the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord, researchers at UWM were busy working on GRAPES, or Grid-connected Advanced Power Electronic Systems. Faculty and students in electrical engineering won a national grant to find ways to improve the power grid, including, by adding renewable resources, and they don't believe the president's decision will impact their work in the long run.

Susan Bence

We Energies uses a variety of means to produce power. But for decades, coal-burning plants were the company's backbone. WUWM wondered whether the utility would beef up its use of coal, now that President Trump is walking away from the Paris climate agreement.

We Energies Spokesman Brian Manthey says don't expect to see additional coal burning. "It's important for our customers that we don't have all of eggs in one fuel basket."

Manthey says We Energies has been working to diversify its portfolio.

Lauren Groh

Contributor Lauren Groh has been through-hiking the Appalachian Trail this spring and summer.  So far, she and her hiking companions have hit several major milestones - including reaching 400 miles on the journey.

Groh checked in from the trail just recently and reflected on the day-to-day challenges of surviving such a major undertaking:

It's day 42 in the Appalachian Trail. We left Erwin, Tennessee three days ago, and our next stop is Hampton. We will hit the 400-mile mark tomorrow, if we push it!

Marti Mikkelson

Milwaukeeans are still buzzing about President Trump’s decision last week to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord. The United Nations forged the agreement a few years ago; it’s dedicated to curbing global warming. WUWM asked people at Bradford Beach on Lake Michigan in Milwaukee what they think the potential impacts could be on the environment.

Scott Beringer is relaxing in a lawn chair, eating a sandwich. He says he’s not happy with President Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris accord.

Gianofer Fields

If you happen to be walking through some Madison neighborhoods, you may notice a peculiar anomaly: poetry embedded in the sidewalk. It’s part of a project aptly named “Sidewalk Poetry.”

Jack Kear is a board member and Chair of the Arts Committee of the Marquette Neighborhood Association, who inherited the project when he joined the association 4 years ago. He says “Sidewalk Poetry,” was inspired by similar installations in Minnesota. The idea is to connect people to their neighborhoods, create a sense of place.

Ex Fabula: Summer Begins

Jun 3, 2017
Elizabeth Dawson

The first days of summer: people are getting their gardens ready and their kids signed up for camp, summer school or whatever else will keep them busy. So this week we have a great story about the generational love of gardening (it’s a good time to plant those tomatoes) and a story from a lovely, if not over-stimulated, summer school instructor.

f11photo / Fotolia

Don’t look now, but we’re already into June and into that fleeting period in Wisconsin known as summer. Maybe you have big plans for the summer - but even the busiest among us have those summer days, or nights, where we’re considering how to spend our time.

"The best part of summer is that it always revives that child-part in us, and here in Milwaukee I think it really does that," says Milwaukee Magazine editor-in-chief Carole Nicksin. 

Office of the President of the United States / Wikimedia

It’s hard to overstate how irregular the news cycle is at the moment. With new allegations about the Trump Administration’s Russian ties coming out seemingly on the hour - it can be difficult to make sense of what’s really going on, even for journalists.

Veterans Health / Flickr

This week marks the 150th anniversary of the facility that is known today as the Clement J. Zablocki VA Medical Center. It was established in the wake of the Civil War and was one of the first in the country to serve convalescing veterans.

"Folks in this country have always been very patriotic and very supportive of those who, candidly, we put in harms way to protect our freedoms," says Dr. Dan Zomcheck, the medical director of the Zablocki VA Medical Center. 

Rachel Morello

Wisconsin high school students will soon say goodbye to their teenage stomping grounds, and head off to college, the workforce, the military – all with diplomas in tow.  

A group of graduates from the School District of Waukesha will also leave with another badge of honor: the Seal of Biliteracy.  

Lisa F. Young, fotolia

The state of Wisconsin may bump-up the reimbursement rate for personal care workers—the people who take care of some of the most fragile in society. Across the country, industry reports a shortage of personal care workers, in part, because people don’t believe the job pays well enough. In Wisconsin, some leaders hope a 2 percent bump in the reimbursement rate will lead to higher wages that attract more people.

ibreakstock, fotolia

Sixteen child sexual predators and traffickers were recently arrested across the state through a sting led by the Wisconsin Department of Justice. Brad Schimel is the attorney general.

“In the short period of time involved, this is significant that we have got this many that ended up traveling to try and meet a child for sexual purposes.”

Milwaukee Jazz Vision / mkejazzvision.org

This Friday evening the streets of Bay View will be filled with jazz. Now in its 4th year, the Bay View Jazz Fest promotes both jazz itself and the musicians who make it. The Fest takes place at venues along the intersection of Lincoln and Kinnikinnick avenues tomorrow starting at 5pm.

At least one worker died, and around a dozen employees were injured, in an explosion at an ethanol plant in Cambria, WI. Two workers are missing. Recovery teams are digging through the ruins of one of the plant's buildings, searching for the missing employees.

The blast happened late Wednesday at the Didion Milling Plant in the Columbia County village, which is about 20 miles northwest of Beaver Dam.

Women of color in Milwaukee will be disproportionately harmed by a provision in the American Health Care Act ending Medicaid reimbursements for abortion providers, such as Planned Parenthood. This could result in severely limited services such as gynecological exams, STD testing and treatment, and contraception.

Until she was 20, Tiferet Berenbaum, 34, had never seen a gynecologist. She had never had a Pap smear, or even heard of one.

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