Music Interviews
3:15 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Perennial Co-Writer Returns With An Album Of His Own

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:25 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

And we're going to talk now with Dan Wilson. You may think you don't know him, but you do. He's your favorite songwriter's favorite co-writer. For instance, power ballads with Adele? Check.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SOMEONE LIKE YOU")

ADELE: (Singing) Never mind, I'll find someone like you.

CORNISH: Hooks for hip hop royalty like Nas? Check.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROSES")

NAS: (Rapping) Heard you tear a rose from the roots, the rose screams.

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Around the Nation
3:15 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Months Of Training And A Moment Of Silence As Marathon Draws Near

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 4:29 pm

Even as Boston pays tribute to the victims of the marathon bombing, runners are preparing to run in the race next week. NPR is following the stories of eight of these participants, dubbed the "NPR 8."

Around the Nation
3:15 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

The Long Wait On Safety Rules For The 'Soda Can' Of Rail Cars

Safety advocates have been pressuring Canadian and U.S. officials to create new safety standards for tank cars and to make old DOT-111s like this one more puncture-resistant.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 4:29 pm

Freight trains roll through the Chicago suburb of Barrington, Ill., every day, many pulling older tank cars known as DOT-111s. They're known as the "soda can" of rail cars, says village President Karen Darch, because their shells are so thin.

Many of the DOT-111s are full of heavy Canadian tar sands crude oil. Some carry ethanol. And more and more of them are loaded with light Bakken crude oil from North Dakota.

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News
3:15 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Boston Mourns A Tragic Anniversary With Voices Of Victims

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 4:29 pm

One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.

Technology
3:15 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Between Heartbleed And Homeland, NSA Treads Cybersecurity Gray Area

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 4:10 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

News of the critical security bug Heartbleed sent people scurrying to change their online passwords last week. Days later came a report from Bloomberg News that the National Security Agency knew about the bug for at least two years, but the NSA denied having knowledge of the Heartbleed bug or exploiting it for their own spying purposes.

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Around the Nation
3:15 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Yearly Homecoming Makes For A Springtime Fish Frenzy

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 4:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The American shad lives most of its life at sea except for a few weeks in early spring, when it swims upstream into rivers to spawn. That's precisely what fishermen in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania have been waiting for.

As NPR's Joel Rose reports, the shad's annual return to the Delaware River is a springtime tradition that goes back centuries.

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Medical Treatments
3:15 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

With Some Drug Combinations, Overdose Might Be In The Prescription

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 4:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The dangerous practice of mixing benzodiazepines and opiates doesn't just lie with people like Sayra Small, who was abusing heroin. New research suggests that part of the problem may lie with primary care doctors who are prescribing a mix of benzos for anxiety and opioids for pain.

Those are the findings of Dr. Sean Mackey. He joins us now. He is the chief of pain medicine at Stanford School of Medicine. Welcome to the program.

SEAN MACKEY: Great to be here, thank you.

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Around the Nation
3:15 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Alabama Tax Program Grows Out Of A Grandfather's Lasting Legacy

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 4:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

Alabama consistently ranks near the bottom in most social measures. And as a result, college graduates tend to flee the state for better opportunities elsewhere. Now, a college professor is trying to stop the migration. Stephen Black's inspiration is his grandfather, the late Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. NPR's Debbie Elliott has this profile.

DEBBIE ELLIOTT, BYLINE: Stephen Black sits at his grandfather's old desk, rifling through the drawers.

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Around the Nation
3:15 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Oil Is Not All That's Booming In North Dakota — So Is Drug Trade

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 4:29 pm

Local and federal authorities worry over a rise in North Dakota's drug trade. Sharon Cohen of the Associated Press explains the proposed solutions to the issue, which some tie to the recent oil boom.

Space
3:15 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

For A Fast Track To Blossom, Just Send Some Seeds To Space

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 4:29 pm

After spending eight months on a Japanese space expedition, a cherry pit that's now four years old has mysteriously blossomed six years before it was due.

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