Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

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Ann-Elise Henzl

This week, as national leaders consider ways to reduce gun violence, we’re reporting on the hundreds of people in Milwaukee living with gunshot injuries.

WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl talked to three men with spinal cord injuries, about how a bullet changed their lives.

Thanks to improvements in medical care, more victims recover from gunshot wounds, which once might have been fatal.

However, the growing survival rate does not tell the full story about victims’ experiences. Some face significant physical and emotional damage.

Ann-Elise Henzl

It seems several times each month, Milwaukee mourns people who have been shot to death.

Last year in the city, gunfire killed 72.

While the U.S. hopes it never again suffers a mass shooting like last Friday’s in Connecticut, violence is all too common for some children.

Kids in certain Milwaukee neighborhoods are familiar with the sound of gunfire, and with losing people they love.

WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl sat down to talk with several students here, who have lived amid violence.

Ann-Elise Henzl

If you have young kids in the family, you may open handmade gifts this month – holiday projects little fingers crafted at school. Perhaps adult relatives or friends will also offer their own creations.

WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl found places in town where “grown-ups” are taking time to explore their creative side, or, in some cases, learn crafts of past generations.

Gov. Walker
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Gov. Scott Walker announced Friday that Wisconsin will not create its own health insurance exchange, as part of the federal Affordable Care Act. Walker says he will leave the responsibility to the federal government.

Governor Walker will announce his decision Friday, as to whether Wisconsin will create a state-run health insurance exchange or rely on the federal government to develop a plan.

WUWM inquired about Kentucky’s plan – that state is months ahead in planning its exchange.

Although the U.S. Supreme Court upheld it this year, the fate of the president’s health care overhaul was uncertain until the election. Governors, such as Wisconsin’s Scott Walker, put off implementing portions of the Affordable Care Act until after the vote, hoping the law would fall, if the president did. However, despite Obama’s victory last week, Gov. Walker has not yet made public his plans for meeting a key demand of the law. As WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl reports, interested parties are waiting, as a deadline approaches.

The polls will be swarming with people on Tuesday as voters cast their ballots in the presidential election. Lately, poll watchers and observers have also become a fixture at polling places.

To limit any confusion at the polls, the Government Accountability Board created a list of 10 things Wisconsin voters should know. Kevin Kennedy, director and general counsel of Wisconsin’s Government Accountability Board, went over some of the list’s highlights with WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl.

WUWM has been reporting this week on the disconnect between job seekers and job openings – a phenomenon known as the “skills gap.”

However, the barrier for some workers is not a lack of skills, but rather, transportation. Some worksites are not located on a bus line, so those positions might not work for people without a car. In other instances, job seekers have lost driving privileges.

All this week, WUWM has been exploring the skills gap, in our series Project Milwaukee: Help Wanted.

Our project included a public forum on the downtown campus of MATC. Experts from different perspectives offered solutions for spanning the disconnect between people looking for work, and the jobs available.

Wisconsin Historical Society

Our Project Milwaukee: Help Wanted series this week is exploring the realities and myths of the "skills gap," the apparent mismatch between unemployed workers and existing jobs.

Historic Photo Collection / Milwaukee Public Library

Many people are looking for work, while at the same time some employers say they can’t find skilled applicants to fill jobs. We’re reporting on the “skills gap” this week in our series, Project Milwaukee: Help Wanted.

The disconnect between jobs and workers is a relatively new phenomenon in Milwaukee. During the city’s manufacturing heyday, from the late 1800s until the 1970s, there were thousands of jobs in the Menomonee Valley alone – and a steady stream of workers to fill them.

Series Preview

Oct 26, 2012

There’s been increasing talk lately about the “skills gap” – the phenomenon of employers unable to find skilled workers. WUWM examines the issue in the series Project Milwaukee: Help Wanted.

The stories will air all next week on Morning Edition, Lake Effect and All Things Considered. WUWM also will host a community forum at MATC on Tuesday Oct. 30. We’ll ask expert panelists and audience members to talk about the role government, educators and other groups have, in connecting workers and jobs.

A Wisconsin T-shirt company is capitalizing on the Packers’ loss to the Seahawks Monday night. Green Bay lost to Seattle in the last play of the game, because of a disputed call by the NFL’s replacement officials. They’re filling in for union referees, amid a lockout.