Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

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Early in Milwaukee’s history, residents flocked to the Milwaukee River to recreate. They gathered at the beer gardens and swimming schools that lined the shores, north of downtown.

By the end of the 1900s however, development and runoff had polluted the river, and the community began abandoning it. It wasn’t until about 1970 that comprehensive efforts began to remediate the problems.

The river is far from its pristine state. Yet in today’s installment of our series Milwaukee River Revival, WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl views how the river has again become a draw for leisure-time activities.

Milwaukee’s skyline could have a distinct new feature in a few years: a 44-story tower. County Executive Chris Abele outlined the plans Wednesday. The building would be located across the street from Discovery World and the northern entrance to Summerfest. As WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl reports, the development would include hotel rooms and housing to meet what planners call a growing demand.

There will likely be primary elections in recall races targeting Republican Gov. Scott Walker, Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch, and four GOP state senators.

The Republican Party of Wisconsin says it has lined up “fake” Democrats to run in primaries, against the real Democrats who hope to challenge the six Republican incumbents.

The fake Democrats, like genuine candidates, will need to obtain enough valid signatures to get on the ballot. The Republican party says it would not spend money on the fake Democrats’ campaigns.

The party says the move is meant to force primaries in the race, thus creating firm dates for upcoming recall elections.

It will soon be relatively easy to learn who signed the recall petitions against Gov. Scott Walker and four Republican state senators.

On Wednesday, two Tea Party groups plan to activate the searchable online database they’ve created.

John Gunther

Earlier this morning we talked with Scott Walker about his first year as governor.

He has been the driver of the sweeping and controversial changes in Wisconsin.

They include restricting public union rights and deeply cutting money for education.

As a result, critics are attempting to recall him, while supporters praise him for being bold.

In this segment of our series, Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval, WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl shares insights from people who have observed Walker become the politician he is today.

Gov. Scott Walker
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Today we begin Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval. All week, we’ll explore the intersection of Wisconsin’s volatile political and economic climates in 2011.

The central figure in the drama has been Republican Gov. Scott Walker, now approaching his first anniversary in office.

Later this morning, we'll talk with people who've observed the politician over the years.

This hour, Walker reflects on his first year as governor, and his ideological formation. He chatted with WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl.

Series Preview

Dec 9, 2011
Eric Thayer/Getty Images and AndyStenz.com

In the coming week, WUWM’s Newsroom reporters and Lake Effect producers will reflect on the divisive year in Wisconsin politics.

Our series, Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval will address the subject from a variety of perspectives, including why so many sweeping policy changes were enacted in 2011, how the state has changed as a result, and where Wisconsin is headed.

After months of planning, the major groups hoping to recall Republican Gov. Scott Walker kicked off their efforts overnight.

The state Democratic party and the group United Wisconsin held events around the state to distribute recall petitions and collect the first signatures.

WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl stopped in at one of the gatherings, and joined Bob Bach in the studio for this conversation.

Camp Yellow Ribbon

Aug 22, 2011
Ann-Elise Henzl

As we near the end of summer, kids are returning from camp.

Last Friday for instance, children in Oconomowoc reunited with their families. These young people are used to being separated from parents, because their mothers, fathers – or both – are in the military.

Camp Yellow Ribbon

Aug 22, 2011
Ann-Elise Henzl

As we near the end of summer, kids are returning from camp.

Last Friday for instance, children in Oconomowoc reunited with their families. These young people are used to being separated from parents, because their mothers, fathers – or both – are in the military.

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