Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

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Camp Yellow Ribbon

Aug 22, 2011
Ann-Elise Henzl

As we near the end of summer, kids are returning from camp.

Last Friday for instance, children in Oconomowoc reunited with their families. These young people are used to being separated from parents, because their mothers, fathers – or both – are in the military.

Camp Yellow Ribbon

Aug 22, 2011
Ann-Elise Henzl

As we near the end of summer, kids are returning from camp.

Last Friday for instance, children in Oconomowoc reunited with their families. These young people are used to being separated from parents, because their mothers, fathers – or both – are in the military.

DCD Commissioner Rocky Marcoux says Milwaukee benefits even when companies locate elsewhere in southeastern Wisconsin.

We look at perspectives south of the Wisconsin-Illinois border as our series on regionalism continues.

An international group specializing in regional economic development is going to examine the corridor along southeastern Wisconsin and northeastern Illinois and recommend ways we might strengthen our region globally.

One of the people watching – and taking part in -- the Madison protests has been Margaret (Peggy) Rozga.

She’s an English professor at UW-Waukesha, but perhaps is best known as the widow of James Groppi. He was the former Catholic priest and activist who was a major leader in the civil rights movement in Milwaukee in the 1960s.

More than 1/3 of Wisconsin’s state senators could be fighting for their political future because of voter outrage over the governor’s budget repair bill.

A number of recall attempts have been launched against the Democrats who’ve left the state to delay a vote, as well as Republicans who support Gov. Walker’s divisive proposal.

Andy Stenz Photography

Recall paperwork has been filed in recent days for eight Republican state senators and five of their Democratic colleagues.

The Government Accountability Board said Wednesday the Republicans targeted are: Robert Cowles, Alberta Darling, Glenn Grothman, Sheila Harsdorf, Randy Hopper, Dan Kapanke, Mary Lazich and Luther Olsen.

The Democratic senators targeted are: Spencer Coggs, Dave Hansen, Jim Holperin, Minority Leader Mark Miller and Robert Wirch.

Protests in Madison enter a second week today. Thousands of people are expected in the state’s capital today to continue their protests against a bill that would strip unionized state workers of virtually all of their collective bargaining rights.

WUWM’s Bob Bach was in Madison over the weekend and joins us in the studio this morning with more on the story.

WUWM begins a week-long look at the state's food economy in our series, Project Milwaukee: What's on Our Plate? The foods that are grown here have always been intertwined with the state's history. Some analysts believe food is also key to the region's future. In our first installment, Ann-Elise Henzl reports on how Wisconsin became so closely associated with food.

Ann-Elise Henzl

Last month's floods made life more desperate for people with limited means. That's according to the latest Vital Signs report the Greater Milwaukee Foundation released Monday. It gauges the level of economic need in the four-county area. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl visited an older Milwaukee woman who can no longer live in her home, to find out how she's coping.

Ann-Elise Henzl

When you think of urban birds, images of sparrows or seagulls might come to mind. But there are 30 pairs of nesting peregrine falcons in Wisconsin, many right in the city. At one point the sleek birds of prey were wiped out, probably because of the pesticide DDT. Peregrines are still endangered. But they're doing pretty well these days, according to researchers who monitor them. Ann-Elise Henzl tagged along as a falcon expert checked on chicks born just a few weeks ago.

School Funding

Jun 4, 2010

Over the past week, WUWM has been exploring barriers to achievement in the Milwaukee Public Schools system. Today, on the final day of our Project Milwaukee series, we ask the question: is more generous funding the key to producing better grades? As WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl learned, it depends on whom you ask.

This week on WUWM we're reporting on barriers to achievement in the Milwaukee Public Schools system. Thousands of students have been performing poorly on tests, and hundreds of teens drop out every year. As we’ve been highlighting in our series, children can have trouble learning for a number of reasons. One is that they may be surrounded by disruptive students. Troublemakers can cause distractions, at best. But in this installment of Project Milwaukee, Ann-Elise Henzl reports on one program helping restore order in classrooms.

We begin our “Project Milwaukee: Barriers to Achievement in MPS” series with a brief look at the state of our schools. Ann-Elise Henzl is the executive producer of WUWM’s Project Milwaukee series and a reporter for the WUWM new room. Stephanie Lecci is Lake Effect’s coordinating producer.

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