Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

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This election year, WUWM and other public radio stations have collaborated with NPR on A Nation Engaged. The project has probed voters on how they feel about a variety of issues.

In our final installments this week, we ask Milwaukeeans what it means to them to be Americans, and what the next president could do to advance that vision. We collected these responses at a job fair for veterans in Milwaukee.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Wisconsin still isn’t sure how the presidential race will play out here. But the candidates or their surrogates continue coming to campaign. A couple rallies over the weekend didn’t turn out exactly as planned.

Cincinnati Police Department, Facebook

Milwaukee leaders continue to grapple with how to reduce crime. A Common Council committee began a series of public meetings this week on a proposed public safety plan. It relies heavily on beefing up law enforcement and imposing tough sentences to the dismay of people who favor a different tack.

The NAACP and others want Milwaukee to learn from an approach police in some other cities take.

VINCENT DESJARDINS, FLICKR

Milwaukee has a growing problem with prostitution. It appears to have gotten out of control on the near south side. That's according to residents who testified at the Common Council's Public Safety Committee meeting on Thursday.

Ald. Bob Donovan chairs the panel and represents part of the near south side. He says prostitution there is nothing new.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Some Milwaukee voters didn't wait to hear Monday night's debate, as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump attempted to woo voters. In-person absentee voting began Monday in downtown Milwaukee at the Zeidler Municipal Building. 

Business was brisk. We asked a number of voters what issues were important to them as they cast their ballots. Additional early voting sites on the north and south sides will open October 10.

JEFF BERMAN:

S Bence

Mayor Tom Barrett says Talgo plans to refurbish rail cars for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority at Milwaukee's Century City.

READ: WUWM's Coverage on Century City

About six years ago, Talgo began manufacturing high-speed trains at its Century City facility, for the high-speed rail line that was set to travel through Wisconsin. But that work ended after the state broke its contract with the company in the wake of Scott Walker's first election as governor.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

A weekend brunch staple: the Bloody Mary. The vodka and tomato juice drink has become known for its garnishes, which tower over other cocktails. Garnishes in Milwaukee may include asparagus spears, jumbo shrimp, even a piece of brisket or a miniature hamburger.

Michelle Maternowski

Gov. Scott Walker is drawing sharp criticism for his plan to delay highway projects, including the Zoo Interchange in Milwaukee. In the past, the governor has hailed the interchange as key to state businesses that transport products throughout the region.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Update: Three Republican legislators are requesting an investigation into who leaked the secret John Doe documents to The Guardian. Assemblymen Robin Vos, Jim Steineke and John Nygren have sent a letter to Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel, asking him to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate, insisting the person responsible committed a crime.

(Original post follows)

Ann-Elise Henzl

Barbara Miner's ears pricked up last week when Mayor Tom Barrett suggested people living in homes built before 1952 install water filters, especially if small children live there. Miner asked: "Really? Why haven't we heard about this before?"

Miner's Riverwest home is among 70,000 with lead laterals. Those are the pipes that connect houses to the city's water mains. As the laterals age, lead can break off and mix with drinking water.

Milwaukee has seen more violence and unrest than usual over the last few weeks. August was the city's deadliest month in a quarter century with 24 homicides. And over one weekend, protesters threw rocks at police, and torched businesses, angry about a fatal police shooting. Yet many people are giving less than rave reviews to a new proposal to boost public safety.

Critics say the plan is out of touch with what the community needs. And City Hall may hear those criticisms again on Thursday.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Wisconsin has had its share this year of visits from Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Thursday night, it was Gary Johnson's turn. The Libertarian presidential hopeful stopped in Milwaukee for a spirited rally.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

In collaboration with NPR for the A Nation Engaged series, public radio stations across the country are asking people this week: What is America's place in the world?

For answers from a Wisconsin perspective, WUWM talked to people involved in agriculture. It's one of the most important sectors of the state economy. Those involved envision its role on the global stage growing.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The new Mexican Consulate in Milwaukee was formally inaugurated this afternoon. Among those taking part were Mexican Foreign Minister Claudia Ruiz Massieu and Gov. Scott Walker.

The consulate, located at 1443 N. Prospect, will provide services for Mexican nationals, such as help in procuring legal documents.

Original story from February 16, 2016:

City of Milwaukee (Department of City Development)

Could jobs be headed to Milwaukee's north side? A local businessman is hopeful, and he’s talking with others.

Tim Sullivan used to lead South Milwaukee giant Bucyrus, a mining manufacturer. Now he's CEO of REV Group, a firm headquartered in Milwaukee, which makes ambulances, buses, street sweepers and a range of other vehicles.

REV Group has bid on a contract with the United States Postal Service to build vans.

Sullivan says the city's north side would be the perfect place to do the work because of the area's huge labor pool.

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