Ann-Elise Henzl

News Director

Ann-Elise Henzl became news director in September 2017.

Prior to her appointment, she worked in the WUWM Newsroom for more than 20 years. She served in a number of roles, including executive producer of the award-winning Project Milwaukee series, substitute news anchor for Morning Edition, and general assignment reporter.

Ann-Elise has been recognized for her work on numerous occasions, such as when she and a colleague shared the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio Television Digital News Association (for best use of sound in a story).

Ann-Elise has English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee, and attended Marquette University for two years.

When she's not at work, she often can be found at one of the area's dog parks, with her pal, Peabody.

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It can be uncomfortable to discuss race relations. Discussions may be particularly minimal, in a region as segregated as metro Milwaukee. The group Ex Fabula relies on storytelling to make inroads. It invites its fellows to share personal tales about prejudice and misunderstandings.


Hundreds of people in Wisconsin die each year from heroin or prescription painkiller overdoses. Milwaukee's city and county leaders are beginning a combined effort to curb opioid abuse. 

They believe they can accomplish more together than on their own. On Friday, the City-County Heroin, Opioid and Cocaine Task Force will hold its first meeting at City Hall.

Andy Stenz

President Donald Trump wants to slash the federal workforce, according to the Washington Post. It reports that Trump is preparing to announce the biggest cuts in decades, believing the government employs too many people -- wasting taxpayers' money.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

When it comes to replacing the Affordable Care Act, a couple Wisconsin leaders from different parties have one thing in common. Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Republican Gov. Scott Walker both expect the GOP plan to continue to evolve before Congress votes on it.

Both of the elected officials commented on the measure Tuesday.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Public Library

Poverty is entrenched in some of Milwaukee's mainly black neighborhoods. People studying the issue say financial struggles piled up as employers left. So they say change only will come when more people are put to work, in family-supporting jobs.

Decades of racist policies and attitudes have led to entrenched segregation in metro Milwaukee. African-Americans remain concentrated in the city, including in its poorest neighborhoods.

The Milwaukee metro area has a reputation as one of the most segregated in the United States. A number of studies support that reputation. Yet what's talked about less are the reasons the community is so divided, and the consequences.

Micaela Martin

Thousands of undocumented immigrants in Milwaukee may skip work Monday, and refrain from shopping at local businesses. They'll march from the south side to the Milwaukee County Courthouse, as part of Voces de la Frontera's annual day of activism. It's meant to show the impact of immigrants and refugees on the local economy and the broader community.

The day comes as some feel under attack, after a surge in enforcement by federal agents in other states in the last week. Worries already had been heightened, after a recent incident in Arizona.

Tweet from the Donald J. Trump account

President Donald Trump and Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke are among politicians these days who use social media to send messages directly to the public. Neither elected official has shied away from using tough talk to criticize opponents.


Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke has a reputation for saying what's on his mind, even if it's not politically correct. But critics say his rhetoric may have crossed a line.

Clarke's words have often made waves over the last few years. For instance, when his office ran a public service announcement, in which Clarke urged Milwaukee County residents to arm themselves, saying they can’t count on police to get there in time. Clarke says: "You can beg for mercy from a violent criminal, hide under the bed or you can fight back."

Niki Johnson

Tens of thousands of people will cheer on Donald Trump as he takes the oath of office Friday in Washington, D.C. The Associated Press reports that the district's director of homeland security says officials expect 800,000 to 900,000 to attend.

Voces de la Frontera Action

In the days leading up to Donald Trump’s inauguration, critics are planning hundreds of demonstrations across the nation. Some say protests will continue in the months after Trump takes office.

Many people who give back to the community are motivated by causes that touch them, personally. That's the case for Alex Brkich. Because of his experience with his mother, Brkich has made his Wauwatosa restaurant Cranky Al’s friendly to people with Alzheimer’s and other memory loss.

Ann-Elise Henzl

During this holiday season, WUWM reporters are sharing stories of local people who give back to the community. In this installment of our year-end series Life's Voices, we meet Diane De La Santos.

Students and graduates of the theater program at UW-Milwaukee are helping Milwaukee police learn how to respond to people with mental illness, who are in distress. The actors present training scenarios at the police academy and instructors walk officers through how to best respond.

There have been cases, including in Milwaukee, when police have shot and killed mentally ill individuals as interactions have spun out of control.

9comeback, fotolia

This week, we experienced the longest night of the year on the winter solstice. Local religious groups picked the date to hold a conversation about lifting people in Milwaukee out of darkness. Jewish groups helped organize the event, while the host was the Islamic Resource Center in Greenfield. The standing-room-only crowd called for an end to racism, hate crimes and intolerance.