Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

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David Guo, flickr

So far this year, more than 5,600 people in Milwaukee have had their vehicle stolen. The number is more than 67 percent higher than it was at this time in 2013.

You might picture the thieves stealing cars to sell them or to sell their parts. But typically, that's not what's happening. "Often it's been determined that those vehicles have been used in the commission of crimes," says Jim Tolkan, president of the Automobile Dealers Association of Mega Milwaukee, or ADAMM.

Ann-Elise Henzl

Many teenagers in Milwaukee are sexually active. The Centers for Disease Control estimates that 52 percent of high schoolers in Milwaukee have had intercourse at least once. The national average is 47 percent. 

A program in Milwaukee is urging teens to adopt safe sex practices in case adults have not raised the subject. A big component of the program is hiring young people to pass out condoms to friends and strangers.

Michael Ireland, fotolia

On Tuesday, the Milwaukee Police Department announced the arrest of three men in the fatal shooting last year of five-year-old Laylah Petersen. She was killed while sitting on her grandfather's lap. Bullets ripped through the window of his home.

The shooting took place in Milwaukee's seventh police district on the northwest side. Violent crime is part of life for some residents in the area.

"We hear gunshots on a daily basis."

LaToya Dennis

Nearly one year ago, five-year-old Laylah Peterson was shot dead while sitting on her grandfather’s lap in his home on Milwaukee’s north side. On Tuesday, police announced three arrests. 

Investigators say the three men were seeking revenge because one of their brothers was killed. But they fired bullets into the wrong home. Emotions ran high during the press conference announcing the arrests.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

This week a Milwaukee jury ruled against a former gun shop to the tune of almost $6 million. The jury said the owners of Badger Guns allowed a "straw purchase" of a weapon in 2009. 

The man who took possession of the gun shot two police officers in the head, seriously wounding them.

The case could be tied up in the court system for years. Yet the ruling could have a more immediate impact. It was the first in the nation to find a gun store liable since a 2005 federal law took effect, which protects gun stores in many cases.

Ann-Elise Henzl

A mismatch between the supply of psychiatrists and patient demand is causing long wait times for appointments.

One of the main reasons there aren't enough psychiatrists to go around is the sheer volume of patients, according to Pete Carlson. He's head of Behavioral Health for Aurora Health Care.

Carlson says mental health parity laws and the Affordable Care Act have opened the door.

"We have so many more people that have coverage. There's been some improvement in really destigmatizing mental health care, so more people are accessing services," Carlson says.

Rebecca Bradley via Facebook

On Friday, Gov. Scott Walker announced appellate Judge Rebecca Bradley will take the place of the late Justice N. Patrick Crooks on the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

Crooks passed away last month.

Gov. Walker said, "(she has) truly lived up to her promise to be a judge that demonstrates unwavering commitment to the Constitution and the rule of law in every case that comes before her."

Ann-Elise Henzl

Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele gave his budget address Wednesday. He picked both a location and an audience for the speech that have not been the norm.

Every Milwaukee County executive must propose next year's budget by October 1. So for years, execs delivered the budget at the county board's September meeting, in the courthouse.

But Wednesday, Chris Abele outlined his plan for 2016 at the Pritzlaff Building downtown.

Flickr/alumroot

This fall in Madison, a continued partisan divide seems likely as state lawmakers get busy. Republicans and Democrats are pushing widely different agendas. A couple factors -- including the end of Gov. Walker's presidential campaign -- could influence what bills pass.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos says Republicans, who hold the majority in his house and the Senate, have a full slate of business. He outlined the party's plans at the Capitol late last week.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

People from a variety of faiths gathered in downtown Milwaukee to watch Pope Francis' speech to a joint meeting of Congress. About 40 assembled at the First Unitarian Society. Some were church members; others heard about the viewing event and wanted to be a part of it.

All listened intently to Pope Francis' speech. Sometimes they gave a thumbs up or briefly applauded.

At the speech's conclusion, they moved their folding chairs into a circle for a lively chat about the many points in the address.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A  number of Milwaukeeans are heading to the cities where Pope Francis will spend the next week: Washington, DC; New York and Philadelphia. They have different reasons for making the trip.

One of the local people heading to see Pope Francis is not a Catholic. It's Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele.

"I'm just excited for what I'm sure is a once-in-a-lifetime experience," Abele says.

DragonImages, fotolia

About 800,000 Wisconsin residents have taken college courses but have not completed a degree. To help them, the University of Wisconsin System launched a program about a year and a half ago, called the Flexible Option.

The program allows students to earn college credit for demonstrating what they’ve learned on their own. They work at their own pace. The UW System was the first public university system to offer such a program.

Wisconsin State Superintendent Tony Evers opposes a proposal to change how the state selects its head of the Department of Public Instruction. He made his case Thursday in his annual State of Education address.

The address is a time for the superintendent to point out the year's highlights and challenges in public education. But the battle over Evers' job stole the show.

He insisted the position should remain an elected one.

Ann-Elise Henzl

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton gave a fiery speech Thursday evening, in her first Wisconsin appearance since she entered the 2016 presidential race.

Flickr/althouse

It would become a felony in Wisconsin to sell or experiment with remains of fetuses aborted after 2014 under a bill an Assembly committee approved Wednesday morning. Researchers could still use cell lines and tissue obtained before this year in their quest to treat diseases.

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