Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

» Contact WUWM News

John Sommers II & Alex Wong/Getty Images

There's a lot riding on the upcoming national party conventions. The events might be one of the best chances Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have to polish their images, as they head into the final months of the campaign. Both candidates have a lot of work to do to win over voters, according to the latest Marquette Law School Poll.

Poll Director Charles Franklin says among registered voters in Wisconsin, 63 percent view Trump unfavorably, while 58 percent have negative views of Clinton.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

This week, NPR is asking voters what a "better life" would look like to them, and whether this year’s slate of politicians can help achieve that vision. WUWM is asking people in Milwaukee. Ann-Elise Henzl talked with parishioners on the south side, at the Congregation of the Great Spirit. It weaves Native American traditions into Catholic services.

Milwaukee Bucks Facebook

A chain link fence has gone up in downtown Milwaukee, and construction vehicles have begun crisscrossing the site of the new Bucks arena. Project proponents say it will ensure the team's success and be a source of pride for the community. But first, the neighborhood must live through disruptions the project will cause over the next two years.

COMPUJERAMEY/FLICKR

Milwaukee counts historic buildings, such as City Hall and the Pabst Theater, among its treasures. Both are more than 100 years old. Yet when it comes to certain venues less than one-third that age, the community is demolishing them, or giving them major facelifts.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

A "media blitz" is underway in San Francisco this week. Dozens of news outlets are reporting on the city’s ongoing struggle with homelessness. Their goal is to encourage people to come up with solutions. No such action is planned in Milwaukee; however, one advocate for the homeless says an effort here could publicize the need for housing and funding.

Government Accountability Board

Wisconsin’s Government Accountability Board will be replaced June 30 by two partisan panels - one to oversee elections and the other, ethics. As the GAB's end nears, retiring Executive Director Kevin Kennedy offered a mixed view of the state’s Photo ID law. He told Wisconsin Eye that Republican leaders who passed the law know it's making some voters more confident but divorces itself from the reality that some people don’t have a driver’s license or state ID and cannot easily get one.

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The U.S. Supreme Court has told the State of Wisconsin that justices won't weigh in on Wisconsin's law, requiring doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

DESTINA, FOTOLIA

A new survey shows 42 percent of registered voters in Wisconsin plan to vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton in the presidential race, while 35 percent plan to back GOP candidate Donald Trump. Seventeen percent say they won't support either candidate. Clinton's seven-point lead is smaller than the 10-point advantage she had in the previous poll, conducted in March.

Ann-Elise Henzl | Milwaukee Public Radio

We are joining NPR this week in a special reporting project, called A Nation Engaged. It's exploring whether Americans believe their vote counts. WUWM talks to brand new U.S. citizens who'll be able to vote for the first time in this fall's presidential election.

Thailand native Xou Chang was one of about 100 people from nearly 40 countries who became a citizen at an outdoor naturalization ceremony on Tuesday in Milwaukee.

Photo courtesy of The Racine Journal Times

A state of emergency exists in Racine County for about a dozen homes along the lakefront. The eroding lake bluff is threatening to pull down the houses. 

Emergency officials will meet with residents Tuesday evening to talk about possible solutions.

Roger Tietz is in the business of preventing lake bluff erosion. He works for Edward E. Gillen Marine, a Mequon company that installs shore protection. Tietz says this year a lot of areas without protection are vulnerable.

Milwaukee is wrestling with the crime of carjacking. It seems there are regularly stories in the news about people forced at gunpoint to give up their vehicles. Sometimes those crimes have deadly outcomes, as perpetrators speed away and crash.

On Thursday, members of the Common Council plan to discuss action they could take to reduce carjacking and high-speed chases. Meanwhile, some people concerned about the crime are urging drivers to take precautions. AAA is among them.

: Wisconsin Veterans Museum

For decades, the Wisconsin Veterans Museum has been collecting the personal stories of people who've served in the military. They reflect on their time in uniform, the impact of their service, and their thoughts about it today.     

Some of the reflections the veterans share are intense, especially those recalling fallen soldiers. Other stories are mundane at first, before becoming dramatic.

UW System

Gov. Scott Walker came under fire by UW System administrators and others last year, after his proposed biennial budget suggested altering the mission of the UW System.

For more than 100 years, the Wisconsin Idea has been in place. The mission, which is described in state statutes, says, in part, that the public university system must "extend knowledge and its application beyond the boundaries of its campuses." The statement also says that inherent in the UW System's mission is "public service designed to educate people and improve the human condition."

Ann-Elise Henzl

There's a new plan in Wisconsin to cut the growing cost of prescription drugs. The idea involves having the state analyze drug prices to determine whether they're reasonable.

State Rep. Deb Kolste says there's a simple reason Wisconsin should investigate medicine prices.

"Drug costs are rising at a much faster pace than wages, inflation and even the rest of health care," she says.

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Tens of thousands of graduates are either entering the workforce or searching for their place in it.

And if you're a new grad looking for a job, these may be some of the best words you'll hear this spring:

"There will be an increase that pretty much brings us back to the levels of employment for recent grads that occurred before the recession."

That's Jean Salzer, director of UWM's Career Planning & Resource Center. She’s talking about predictions from the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

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