Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

» Contact WUWM News

Ann-Elise Henzl

Last month's floods made life more desperate for people with limited means. That's according to the latest Vital Signs report the Greater Milwaukee Foundation released Monday. It gauges the level of economic need in the four-county area. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl visited an older Milwaukee woman who can no longer live in her home, to find out how she's coping.

Ann-Elise Henzl

When you think of urban birds, images of sparrows or seagulls might come to mind. But there are 30 pairs of nesting peregrine falcons in Wisconsin, many right in the city. At one point the sleek birds of prey were wiped out, probably because of the pesticide DDT. Peregrines are still endangered. But they're doing pretty well these days, according to researchers who monitor them. Ann-Elise Henzl tagged along as a falcon expert checked on chicks born just a few weeks ago.

School Funding

Jun 4, 2010

Over the past week, WUWM has been exploring barriers to achievement in the Milwaukee Public Schools system. Today, on the final day of our Project Milwaukee series, we ask the question: is more generous funding the key to producing better grades? As WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl learned, it depends on whom you ask.

This week on WUWM we're reporting on barriers to achievement in the Milwaukee Public Schools system. Thousands of students have been performing poorly on tests, and hundreds of teens drop out every year. As we’ve been highlighting in our series, children can have trouble learning for a number of reasons. One is that they may be surrounded by disruptive students. Troublemakers can cause distractions, at best. But in this installment of Project Milwaukee, Ann-Elise Henzl reports on one program helping restore order in classrooms.

We begin our “Project Milwaukee: Barriers to Achievement in MPS” series with a brief look at the state of our schools. Ann-Elise Henzl is the executive producer of WUWM’s Project Milwaukee series and a reporter for the WUWM new room. Stephanie Lecci is Lake Effect’s coordinating producer.

Graduation is just around the corner for many high school students. But in the Milwaukee Public Schools system, a startling number of children drop out before they reach twelfth grade. Many who stay in school perform below national standards. On Friday, WUWM's news reporters and Lake Effect producers will begin a series, which explores challenges in the urban education system. Ann-Elise Henzl is executive producer of Project Milwaukee: Barriers to Achievement in MPS. She joined Bob Bach in the studio for an overview of the series.

Ann-Elise Henzl

A unique group of gospel singers is making music in Milwaukee, at churches and other venues. What makes the choir unusual is the combination of people in it. Some are homeless. Ann-Elise Henzl attended one of the group's rehearsals, and learned that it’s hoping to take a trip abroad this summer.

If you have an idea for conserving or cleaning water -- or even using it -- Milwaukee could one day be the place to develop your invention.

That's the dream. A coalition of community leaders is pushing the city to become a global hub for water research and technology.

But is it really possible for a region to make itself the headquarters of an industry? And is there competition? We seek answers to those questions, in today's installment of Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl reports.

Our Project Milwaukee: Black and White series continues this morning, with a report on a program that brings together professionals of different races. The idea is to increase understanding among the races, in hopes they'll influence their workplace and the larger community. However, some claim the program only scratches the surface. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl has more.

We continue our series Project Milwaukee: Black and White with a look at school segregation. The push to integrate the schools flared racial tensions here in the 1960s and 1970s. The results of the fight were mixed. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl has our report.

Words used in the story may be offensive to some, but are integral to the report.

Pages