Ann-Elise Henzl

News Director

Ann-Elise Henzl became news director in September 2017.

Prior to her appointment, she worked in the WUWM Newsroom for more than 20 years. She served in a number of roles, including executive producer of the award-winning Project Milwaukee series, substitute news anchor for Morning Edition, and general assignment reporter.

Ann-Elise has been recognized for her work on numerous occasions, such as when she and a colleague shared the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio Television Digital News Association (for best use of sound in a story).

Ann-Elise has English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee, and attended Marquette University for two years.

When she's not at work, she often can be found at one of the area's dog parks, with her pal, Peabody.

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Ann-Elise Henzl

The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe has an election observation mission, which sends poll watchers to election sites around the globe. The monitors take notes on goings-on at polling places and report what they see.

Christa Mueller of Germany is among the observers sent to the United States for this fall's elections. She's part of a team, which has kept an eye on election-related activities in the Midwest in the weeks leading up to Election Day.

With all the hype surrounding Tuesday's presidential election, some voters may be tempted to take a photo at the polling place to remember the occasion. For instance, a picture of their completed ballot, or perhaps a selfie with their completed ballot.

But Wisconsin has a law that says you cannot show your completed ballot to another person. So taking a selfie at the polling site is problematic, according to Reid Magney of the Wisconsin Elections Commission. He says the issue isn't so much the photo itself, but rather what people could do with it.

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If you head to the polls Tuesday, don't just expect to see voters and election workers. Observers of all stripes also could be there, keeping an eye on the goings-on.

For months, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump has been urging supporters to head to the polls to combat what he alleges is election-rigging. He renewed his claim recently at a rally in Green Bay.

"They say there's nothing going on (but) people that have died 10 years ago are still voting. Illegal immigrants are voting," Trump said.

Chip Somodevilla and Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As it nears its conclusion, the race for the White House paused in Wisconsin on Tuesday. Both Republican Donald Trump and Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine visited. They each told voters the state will play an important role in the election. The candidates also both made a point to question the character of the other party's nominee for president.

GOP nominee Donald Trump has made frequent appearances in Wisconsin in the last couple months. This time he chose Eau Claire.

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The City of Milwaukee is trying to get its arms around the persistent problem of panhandling. Earlier this year, the city started an effort to educate panhandlers about social services available to them. The new rule that kicks in Friday relies on enforcement. It bans standing on medians to ask for money, something that's grown common in certain areas.

One trouble spot is the neighborhood around 25th and Clybourn. In one block alone, we saw three men holding up cardboard signs asking for money. One man’s sign said: “Homeless. Need a little help.”

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Hundreds of Milwaukeeans ride the bus every day to jobs in Waukesha County. But the funding that helps pay for the routes will dry up in a couple of years. So leaders are spreading the word about the routes' successes in hopes the service will continue -- and even grow.

Milwaukee leaders often call for businesses to create more jobs in the central city. Yet until that dream comes to fruition, hundreds of residents are finding work miles from home and using Milwaukee County buses to get there.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has been ruffling feathers lately by suggesting there could be massive fraud at the polls on Nov. 8. Local elections officials are among the many refuting Trump's allegations and insist every voters' ballot will count.

At a campaign stop in Green Bay, Wisconsin this week, Trump said: "They even want to try to rig the election at the polling booths. And believe me, there's a lot going on."

He repeated his claim of a 'rigged' election during Wednesday's debate:

Military veterans have to tailor their resumes in order to clearly link their experience to the qualifications of the civilian job they're seeking. They also face another challenge: living without the routine and fellowship they had grown accustomed to in military life.

Randy Jackson of South Milwaukee served in the Navy in Desert Storm and left the military in 1993. He says it took him years to adjust to life as a civilian.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Many employers say they offer plenty of opportunities for new veterans just entering the civilian workforce. Yet some vets have to overcome hurdles as they begin their new careers.

When you hear glowing words like these about veterans, it seems like it should be a breeze for them to find jobs:

"They've had more experiences, they've been around the world, which certainly lends to the global environment that we have in our industry."

"They have the work ethic, the dependability, the maturity."

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin has been in Donald Trump's crosshairs this week. That's because Ryan said that although he'll vote for Trump, he’ll focus these remaining weeks leading up to November's election on keeping GOP control of the House, not on helping Trump campaign. Ryan made his comments after the video surfaced last week, showing Trump making lewd, predatory comments about women.

With the Trump-Ryan rift grabbing headlines, the media packed into a speech Ryan had scheduled in Brookfield on Thursday. But he had other issues on his agenda.

Gerardo Mora/Getty Images

The latest Marquette Law School Poll was released on Wednesday. It says Democrat Hillary Clinton has the support of 44 percent of likely voters. Republican Donald Trump, meanwhile, has the backing of 37 percent of likely voters.

Gary Johnson, the Libertarian candidate, had the backing of nine percent of likely voters, while Jill Stein of the Green Party captured three percent. Six percent of voters surveyed remain uncommitted.

The nation continues to watch developments in the race for president, stemming from Donald Trump's offensive comments about women caught on tape in 2005. The fallout has Wisconsin state lawmakers talking. They're pondering whether the controversy surrounding Trump will affect races for the Legislature here.

Wisconsin state Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald has backed fellow Republican Trump for months. At a WisPolitics.com luncheon on Tuesday, he was asked about Trump's boasts that as a celebrity, he could freely kiss and grope women.

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This election year, WUWM and other public radio stations have collaborated with NPR on A Nation Engaged. The project has probed voters on how they feel about a variety of issues.

In our final installments this week, we ask Milwaukeeans what it means to them to be Americans, and what the next president could do to advance that vision. We collected these responses at a job fair for veterans in Milwaukee.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Wisconsin still isn’t sure how the presidential race will play out here. But the candidates or their surrogates continue coming to campaign. A couple rallies over the weekend didn’t turn out exactly as planned.

Cincinnati Police Department, Facebook

Milwaukee leaders continue to grapple with how to reduce crime. A Common Council committee began a series of public meetings this week on a proposed public safety plan. It relies heavily on beefing up law enforcement and imposing tough sentences to the dismay of people who favor a different tack.

The NAACP and others want Milwaukee to learn from an approach police in some other cities take.

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