Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

» Contact WUWM News

Ann-Elise Henzl

A mismatch between the supply of psychiatrists and patient demand is causing long wait times for appointments.

One of the main reasons there aren't enough psychiatrists to go around is the sheer volume of patients, according to Pete Carlson. He's head of Behavioral Health for Aurora Health Care.

Carlson says mental health parity laws and the Affordable Care Act have opened the door.

"We have so many more people that have coverage. There's been some improvement in really destigmatizing mental health care, so more people are accessing services," Carlson says.

Rebecca Bradley via Facebook

On Friday, Gov. Scott Walker announced appellate Judge Rebecca Bradley will take the place of the late Justice N. Patrick Crooks on the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

Crooks passed away last month.

Gov. Walker said, "(she has) truly lived up to her promise to be a judge that demonstrates unwavering commitment to the Constitution and the rule of law in every case that comes before her."

Ann-Elise Henzl

Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele gave his budget address Wednesday. He picked both a location and an audience for the speech that have not been the norm.

Every Milwaukee County executive must propose next year's budget by October 1. So for years, execs delivered the budget at the county board's September meeting, in the courthouse.

But Wednesday, Chris Abele outlined his plan for 2016 at the Pritzlaff Building downtown.

Flickr/alumroot

This fall in Madison, a continued partisan divide seems likely as state lawmakers get busy. Republicans and Democrats are pushing widely different agendas. A couple factors -- including the end of Gov. Walker's presidential campaign -- could influence what bills pass.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos says Republicans, who hold the majority in his house and the Senate, have a full slate of business. He outlined the party's plans at the Capitol late last week.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

People from a variety of faiths gathered in downtown Milwaukee to watch Pope Francis' speech to a joint meeting of Congress. About 40 assembled at the First Unitarian Society. Some were church members; others heard about the viewing event and wanted to be a part of it.

All listened intently to Pope Francis' speech. Sometimes they gave a thumbs up or briefly applauded.

At the speech's conclusion, they moved their folding chairs into a circle for a lively chat about the many points in the address.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A  number of Milwaukeeans are heading to the cities where Pope Francis will spend the next week: Washington, DC; New York and Philadelphia. They have different reasons for making the trip.

One of the local people heading to see Pope Francis is not a Catholic. It's Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele.

"I'm just excited for what I'm sure is a once-in-a-lifetime experience," Abele says.

DragonImages, fotolia

About 800,000 Wisconsin residents have taken college courses but have not completed a degree. To help them, the University of Wisconsin System launched a program about a year and a half ago, called the Flexible Option.

The program allows students to earn college credit for demonstrating what they’ve learned on their own. They work at their own pace. The UW System was the first public university system to offer such a program.

Wisconsin State Superintendent Tony Evers opposes a proposal to change how the state selects its head of the Department of Public Instruction. He made his case Thursday in his annual State of Education address.

The address is a time for the superintendent to point out the year's highlights and challenges in public education. But the battle over Evers' job stole the show.

He insisted the position should remain an elected one.

Ann-Elise Henzl

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton gave a fiery speech Thursday evening, in her first Wisconsin appearance since she entered the 2016 presidential race.

Flickr/althouse

It would become a felony in Wisconsin to sell or experiment with remains of fetuses aborted after 2014 under a bill an Assembly committee approved Wednesday morning. Researchers could still use cell lines and tissue obtained before this year in their quest to treat diseases.

Dennis Felber Photography

More than 25,000 students began the fall semester last week UW-Milwaukee. About 1,000 are military veterans. More vets attend UWM than any other university in a six-state region.

Fossiant, fotolia

It's been a deadly summer in some Milwaukee neighborhoods. Now, state lawmakers are considering increasing penalties for certain gun crimes.

A proposal would create mandatory minimum sentences for felons who possess firearms. Currently, judges have discretion over the length of such sentences.

Ann-Elise Henzl

For the last few months, Wisconsin residents who get food stamps have had to meet a work requirement. 

It’s one of a number of changes lawmakers have approved, or are considering, for the FoodShare program.

Supporters say the changes are about helping people become self-sufficient. Advocates for the poor believe the changes are about making benefits harder to obtain.

Darren Hauck/Getty Images

If Wisconsin Republicans voted in their presidential primary today, 25% would pick Gov. Scott Walker, according to the new Marquette Law School Poll. In April, 40% said they would select Walker.

Most state GOP voters favor other Republican candidates. Following Walker (25%) are Ben Carson (13%), Donald Trump (9%), Ted Cruz (8%), Marco Rubio and Carly Fiorina (each 7%) and Jeb Bush (6%).

Gov. Scott Walker has long been an opponent of the Affordable Care Act. Now, he’s announced a plan to repeal and replace president Obama’s signature legislation, if elected president.

Walker calls the Affordable Care Act “a disaster,” and argues Americans don’t support it.

Pages