Ari Shapiro

Ari Shapiro is an NPR international correspondent based in London. An award-winning journalist, his reporting covers a wide range of topics and can be heard on all of NPR's national news programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Prior to his current post, Shapiro reported from the NPR Washington Desk as White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms, as Justice Correspondent during the George W. Bush administration and as a regular guest host on NPR's newsmagazines. He is also a frequent analyst on CNN, PBS, NBC and other television news outlets.

Shapiro's reporting has consistently won national accolades. The Columbia Journalism Review recognized him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American gavel Award, recognizing a body of work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, L'Olympia in Paris, and Mount Lycabettus in Athens.

Shapiro graduated from Yale University magna cum laude and began his journalism career in the office of NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg.

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Europe
3:24 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

NATO Finds A New Focus In Eastern Europe

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 5:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The crisis in Ukraine may mark a turning point for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The military alliance between the United States and its European partners will be a key focus for President Obama next week. He visits NATO headquarters in Brussels on Wednesday. NPR's Ari Shapiro will be on that trip.

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World
4:09 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Obama Heads To The Hague For Nuclear Summit

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 6:45 am

President Obama goes to The Hague for a nuclear security summit Monday. Although the crisis in Ukraine is overshadowing the event, there is a packed agenda independent of the tensions with Russia. This is the third time world leaders have met to discuss how to keep nuclear materials out of terrorists' hands.

Europe
3:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Will Scotland Leave The UK? One Cafe Sells Cakes to Find Out

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 3:50 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Here's a referendum that would overturn centuries of history. Scotland is deciding whether to leave the United Kingdom. The U.K. is home to more than 60 million people. Scotland holds just about five million of those. They'll vote on independence in September.

NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from Glasgow on the campaign.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: On a bland street near Glasgow's central train station, the Riverhill Coffee Bar announces itself with a vibrant blue facade. It's a teeny sliver of a place.

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Parallels
3:44 am
Tue March 18, 2014

After 300 Years Of Marriage, Scotland Contemplates U.K. Divorce

Pro-independence campaigners attend a rally In Edinburgh, Scotland, in September.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 9:22 am

Scotland has been part of the United Kingdom for more than 300 years. This fall, that could change. In mid-September, a referendum on independence will determine whether Scotland breaks off from England, Northern Ireland and Wales to become a sovereign nation.

Scotland's largest city, Glasgow, is ground zero in this debate. The East End of this city is poor and run down, with some of the worst health figures in Europe. Men here are expected to live into only their mid-50s, some 30 years less than in wealthy areas.

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News
3:30 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Europe Pulls Punches With Limited Sanctions, Wary Of Backfire

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 5:33 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The United States and Europe both condemn the vote in Crimea. President Obama announced measures he says will increase the cost on Russia. They include the freezing of U.S. assets of certain Russian officials. The president warned there would be more to come, quote, "if Russia continues to interfere in Ukraine." The European Union is also issuing sanctions.

Foreign ministers met in Brussels today and NPR's Ari Shapiro tells us what they did.

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