Arnie Seipel

After terrorist attacks in Brussels on Tuesday morning that killed more than 30 people and wounded more than 200, American politicians took to social media and TV news programs to respond to the violence.

Several pointed to the attacks as a reason to focus America's fight against Islamic extremism.

We're compiling responses from elected officials and presidential candidates here:

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell has a message for the Republican Party: "We have to become more respectful of each other."

Speaking on the death of former first lady Nancy Reagan, Powell said he believed she would be "disturbed" by the way her husband's legacy is invoked by some people today. Powell spoke in an interview with NPR's Michel Martin on All Things Considered.

Just seven candidates will take the main stage for the next Republican presidential debate, on the Fox Business Network on Thursday evening — the fewest of any GOP debate so far in the 2016 campaign.

Businessman Donald Trump, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, Dr. Ben Carson, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Ohio Gov. John Kasich will battle it out in the main event in Charleston, S.C.

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham is ending his bid for the Republican presidential nomination.

Graham tweeted the news, with a video of his announcement.

In an interview with CNN, Graham said, "I'm going to suspend my campaign. I'm not going to suspend my desire to help the country."

One of the statement's that got the most attention, and criticism, during Saturday's Democratic presidential debate was Hillary Clinton's assertion that "we now finally are where we need to be" in Syria.

Jeb Bush pounced, along with many others on the right, to call Clinton out on the assertion, given that ISIS still holds a lot of territory in Syria, and given the recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino.

But what's interesting furthermore are the two assertions Clinton made to back up her statement.

Perhaps the clearest sign that Ted Cruz is seriously challenging Donald Trump's dominance in the Republican primary race is that Trump has started attacking him.

President Obama will make his seventh and final State of the Union address on Tuesday, January 12 at 9 p.m. ET.

Following protocol, the president was formally invited in a letter from House Speaker Paul Ryan to address a joint session of Congress on that day. It's the earliest Obama will have ever delivered the speech, coming just under three weeks before the process to succeed him begins with the Feb. 1 Iowa Caucuses. It will occur 374 days before Obama leaves office.

The Obama administration is working to stem the backlash against its plans to resettle Syrian refugees in the United States.

As of late Tuesday, 30 governors — 29 Republicans and 1 Democrat — had expressed opposition to bringing in refugees after European officials confirmed one of the terrorists who attacked Paris last week was a Syrian who had registered with E.U. officials while traveling through Greece seeking asylum.

Updated at 3:32 p.m. ET

Governors in 30 states across the country have now publicly asked for the resettlement of Syrian refugees to stop until security concerns can be addressed.

Those states include: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

One of the suicide bombers who struck Paris on Friday has been identified as a Syrian who passed through Greece as an asylum-seeker this year and registered with European authorities.

That fact has spurred a strong reaction from many politicians here in the United States over the resettlement of Syrian refugees, with swift opposition from many Republican governors, and one Democrat, to further resettlement of Syrian refugees in their states.

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Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Security restrictions have gone into place across France and also here in the United States. NPR's Arnie Seipel has more.

Updated Sunday at 10:52 pm ET.

At a private meeting Sunday night, representatives from most of the Republican presidential campaigns agreed to negotiate directly with broadcasters who are sponsoring debates, pushing the Republican National Committee out of that role.

The presidential campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., announced Sunday that it will begin airing its first campaign ads on television in Iowa and New Hampshire starting Tuesday.

Vice President Biden has developed a reputation for many as the nation's charming but eccentric uncle. His unvarnished, man-of-the-people persona is why many supporters love him — and wanted him to run for president again. But it's also gotten him into trouble on occasion.

Let's recall some of highlights — and a couple of gaffes — from Biden's political career.

1. The First Senate Campaign

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