Arthur Cyr

Foreign Policy Contributor

Arthur I. Cyr is Director of the Clausen Center for World Business and Clausen Distinguished Professor at Carthage College in Kenosha. Previously he was President of the Chicago World Trade Center, the Vice President of the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations, a faculty member and executive at UCLA, and an executive at the Ford Foundation. His publications include the book After the Cold War - American Foreign Policy, Europe and Asia (Macmillan and NYU Press).

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One candidate who was not a part of last night’s debate was James Webb.  That makes sense, since he’s a Democrat.  The DNC announced its primary debate schedule yesterday, which includes a total of six debates, including one in Wisconsin.  Webb announced his candidacy just before Independence Day, which Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr thinks is significant:

Webb’s Vietnam War novel “Fields of Fire,” published in 1978, is generally recognized as one of the best to result from that war.

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A lot has happened in foreign policy this past month. The Greek economic crisis continues and the International Monetary Fund is warning of a gloomy outlook for the Eurozone; the Iran nuclear arms deal has been accepted by all parties; and the United States and Cuba continue to move ever closer to normal diplomatic relations after decades.

In addition, President Obama has been on a state visit to Africa since last Friday. Foreign policy contributor Art Cyr comments on the President's message to Africa and the many other recent events underway across the Atlantic:

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The fight against the so-called "Islamic State" movement in the Middle East dominates much of the world news headlines, along with the crises in South Sudan and in Syria. But there are several other international stories that haven't drawn as much attention in the media in this country.

Among them is the looming economic crisis in Greece. Professor of political economy and world business at Carthage College Art Cyr starts his update on foreign policy issues with Greece.

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Seventy years after World War II came to a conclusion, some of the realities of war have changed a lot – especially in terms of technology.  But Lake Effect contributor Art Cyr says there are some issues – and some debates that haven’t changed.

Up close and personal - that describes targeting individuals in wartime, even when impersonal drone aircraft and electronics are employed.

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This spring marks the anniversaries of the liberation of five concentration camps by United States forces. Seventy years after World War II's end, the effects and implications from the collective experiences of individuals and countries are still being felt. 

Professor of political economy and world business at Carthage College Art Cyr reflects on the legacy of World War II and how it shapes foreign and global policy today. 

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US Senators have been known to drone on for a long time, especially during filibusters.  But it was the written word of 47 US Senators recently that attracted the attention of Lake Effect contributor Art Cyr:

Iran is now a source of tremendous strain in United States domestic politics as well as foreign policy. Escalating divisions between Democrats and Republicans are greatly complicating our foreign policy. In the end, this may strengthen the influence of the fundamentalist Islamic regime in Tehran.

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Between the recent Israeli elections to the deteriorating situation in Yemen, the Middle East is in the news again.

Our foreign policy contributor Art Cyr spoke with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich to put things into context, starting with the root problems creating a potential path to civil war in Yemen:

Lake Effect contributor Art Cyr is Professor of Political Economy and World Business and the Director of the A.W. Claussen Center for World Business at Carthage College in Kenosha.

Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says science, religion and politics often don’t mix.

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The United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence recently released 525 pages of its long awaited report on the use of torture by the CIA in the ongoing “war on terror.”

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From Russia’s incursion into Ukraine and the collapse of the Russian currency, to the ongoing crisis in the middle east, to the ebola outbreak in west Africa and independence votes in Scotland and Catalonia, it’s been a typically busy year on the foreign affairs scene. 

As people begin to look at the leading storylines from the past year, the rise of the so-called Islamic State movement – and its attacks on western interests – will surely be one of the international stories at the top of the list.

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President Obama and his Chinese counterpart this week announced agreement on a plan to curb carbon emissions

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Monday is the 40th anniversary of President Gerald R. Ford's pardon of Richard Nixon, the only President in American history to resign.

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Hundreds gathered at Marquette University Tuesday night to remember slain journalist James Foley. 

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Late yesterday afternoon, Dutch investigators were finally allowed access to the Malaysian jetliner that was shot down over rebel-held territory in Ukraine.  The bodies that have been recovered are being transported back to the Netherlands, where the flight took off last week.  

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