Audrey Nowakowski

Lake Effect Producer

Audrey is a producer for Lake Effect. She is involved with every aspect of the show - from conducting interviews to editing audio to posting web stories and mixing the show together.

Her regular segments include Fit For You and film discussions. Before becoming a full-time producer, Audrey interned for Lake Effect starting in 2014 and joined the team full-time in the spring of 2015.

Audrey is a graduate of Cardinal Stritch University where she majored in Communication Arts and minored in History and English. She has also worked with 91.7 WMSE producing public service announcements.

Ways to Connect

Simon & Schuster

If the new middle-grade novel, The Explorer, feels like a product of another era, maybe that makes sense, because its author Katherine Rundell could be from another era as well.  Despite her fairly young age, Rundell has four novels under her belt, writes screenplays and plays, not to mention proficiency at walking a tightrope, has experience as a bush pilot, and is a fello

"Manlife" Documentary

If you’ve ever taken a drive south along I-94, you might remember seeing a roadside sign in Sturtevant - near Racine - that advertised the "University of Lawsonomy." Or you might have seen the painted sign on a barn that says “Study Natural Law.”

The "law" in question is Lawsonomy: a utopian movement that began in 1929 by Alfred Lawson, a British immigrant who, before he started the eponymous Lawsonomy, founded two Wisconsin airplane manufacturers, and is credited as the inventor of the first passenger airliner.

fabioderby / Fotolia

Millennials seem to get a bad rap these days. Whether it's because they aren't buying homes or are supposedly spending all of their money on avocados, criticism is in no short supply. Typically trends about millennials are not a huge concern for filmmaker and Milwaukee Short Film Festival founder Ross Bigley, but a recent New York Post article caught his attention.

In our Full Plate series, Lake Effect has been exploring the many facets of agriculture, from city bee farms to the history of our state fair to how teaching agriculture to communities can help cities in the long run.

krittisak1122 / Fotolia

"The first time someone hears the word 'Ayurveda,' they say, 'Ayuer-what?'" jokes Carol Nace, Ayurveda practitioner and founder of Bodhi Ayurveda.

Ayurveda is a wellness system that originated in India thousands of years ago, well before modern medicine supplied evidence for the mind-body connection, Nace says.

Monkey Business / Fotolia

For the most part, college students are back on campus and in class. For freshmen, it’s often their first real taste of freedom, a time when they’re becoming adults and breaking free of limitations they’ve had at home.

It’s also a time of experimentation for many - with alcohol, street drugs and with sex. Sex and how it fits into university life is a complex one, with hook-ups co-existing with greater awareness of sexual assault and the importance of consent.

Photograph by A24 / Everett

There are hundreds of heist films in cinematic history. From How to Steal A Million, to Reservoir Dogs, The Italian Job, and the aptly named film Heist.

Mitch Teich

For centuries, humans have used boats for work and transportation. However, rowing boats for sport didn’t start until the early and mid-eighteen hundreds, at English universities like Oxford and Cambridge.

It caught on later in the United States, though the annual rowing match between Harvard and Yale has been held for more than 150 years.

Audrey Nowakowski

It’s a sunny Sunday afternoon at Pinehold Gardens in Oak Creek as guests park off-road and make their way to a long table.

Adorned with a white table cloth and wildflowers, the table is set up on the side of a field full of kale, wildflowers, and other rows of produce.

The occasion for this special (and literal) farm to table dinner is a fundraiser for the Racine Area Youth Farm Corps Program, a branch of the  Eco-Justice program.

Ethan Miller / Getty Images Entertainment

While the characters, plots, and actors of movies may be most memorable to audiences, what is even more quintessential to a memorable film is the score. One of the most iconic scores for a series of films is, of course, John Williams' compositions for Star Wars.

Williams has scored all seven Star Wars films, and is on task for the two to come, making the music as much of a character as Lando Callarisian or, you know, Darth Vader.

solidarity-us.org

Jesus Salas has been involved in nearly every aspect of the agriculture and migrant worker movement in Wisconsin - from founding Obreros Unidos to being CEO of United Migrant Opportunity Services.

As a child, Salas and his family traveled from Crystal City, Texas to the Great Lakes Region to cultivate and harvest crops. In 1959, the family settled in Wautoma, where the young Salas (a third-generation migrant worker) became actively involved in fighting for the rights of improving migrant workers.

DETROIT Movie / facebook.com

Over five days during the summer of 1967, rioting and civil unrest tore apart the city of Detroit, Michigan. The riots left 43 people dead, thousands injured, and more than 2,000 businesses burned or looted.

Detroit, a new film by Kathryn Bigelow, tells the story of the unrest, but in particular the events that transpired at the Algiers Motel. That’s where three young African American men were murdered by police and nine other people, seven black men and two white women, endured brutal beatings.

Brennan's Market / facebook.com

Earlier this summer, the owners of a longtime staple on the Wisconsin produce scene announced they will shut their doors for good at the end of September. Brennan’s Markets was founded 75 years ago and operates five stores around Wisconsin, including in Brookfield and Oconomowoc.

Penguin Random House

The country of Ireland has inspired countless songs, poems, books, and many other creative reflections. For author Kathleen Anne Kenney, her affinity for Ireland grew stronger after visiting the lands that inspired her novel – Girl on the Leeside.

Baby Driver / facebook.com

Summertime is peak season for moviegoers. Studios tend to release blockbusters, and market their films toward the younger audiences who are mostly out of school.

This summer saw the release of movies like Wonder Woman, Valerian, Dunkirk, Baby Driver, and Girls Trip. But as nationally syndicated radio host and resident film review Ryan Jay notes, some films worked better than others:
 

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