Barbara Zabawa

Health Policy Contributor

Barbara J. Zabawa owns the Center for Health and Wellness Law, LLC a law firm dedicated to improving legal access and compliance for the health and wellness industries.  Barbara is also a Clinical Assistant Professor for the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Health Sciences, Department of Health Services Administration.

Barbara is lead author of the book Rule the Rules on Workplace Wellness Programs, published by the American Bar Association. She is a frequent writer and speaker on health and wellness law topics, having presented for national organizations such as WELCOA, National Wellness Institute, HPLive, Healthstat University and HERO.

Before graduating with honors from the University of Wisconsin Law School, she obtained an MPH degree from the University of Michigan. Immediately prior to starting her own firm, she was Associate General Counsel and HIPAA Privacy Officer for a large health insurer where she advised on Affordable Care Act matters. She was also a shareholder and Health Law Team Leader at a large Wisconsin law firm.

Washington State House Republicans / Flickr

Until a few days ago, Senate Republican leaders had been saying they hoped to vote on their version of the bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act before the July 4 holiday.  That plan went by the wayside amid opposition to the secretly drafted legislation from Democrats and some Republicans, as well.

lenetsnikolai / Fotolia

Last month, the House passed legislation intended to repeal and replace one of the Obama Administration's signature legacies: the Affordable Care Act, or ACA. Most analysts believe the bill, called the American Health Care Act, or AHCA, faces a very uncertain future in the Senate, which hasn't formally begun debate on the bill. 

Christian Delbert / Fotolia

President Donald Trump campaigned on repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and has voiced strong support for the American Health Care Plan, which would weaken the landmark legislation. But although the new bill continues to make its way through the House, it remains intensely controversial among both Democrats and Republicans.

tab62 / Fotolia

President Trump vowed a repeal of the Affordable Care Act throughout his campaign and one of his first moves as president was seen as the initial step toward that campaign promise. But healthcare has fallen out of the headlines in the days since then, replaced by other issues.

Mitch Teich

President-elect Donald Trump made "repeal and replacement" of the Affordable Care Act a central talking point in his campaign.  Now that he's been elected, analysts and people covered by the act, referred to as Obamacare, are trying to anticipate how Trump's pledge will translate to reality.

Barbara Zabawa fits both those descriptions.  She's a Madison-based attorney, heading the Center for Health and Wellness Law - and she's covered by the ACA.  Zabawa says you can bet on one certainty in the months to come: change.

Alex E. Proimos, Flickr

With the largest portion of the healthcare reform bill not set to go into law until next year, new research indicates the law is already having an impact on one population.

The study by the Rand Corporation and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services indicates healthcare reform measures are already shielding young adults - under age 26 - from steep medical costs linked to emergency medical care.