Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

NASA/JPL-Caltech

It’s been almost 30 years since scientists first discovered their first exoplanet - a planet orbiting a star other than our own sun. But the scientific community is especially excited now with the discovery late last month of the most earth-like exoplanets yet.

Jayme Stone / Facebook

Alan Lomax wore many hats in his life. He was a musician, folklorist, oral historian, archivist and ethnomusicologist, among other things. Lomax is perhaps most remembered for his work as a field collector of folk music, recording thousands of songs and interviews for the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress. 

Milwaukee Opera Theatre

Productions by the Milwaukee Opera Theatre are always a little offbeat and a lot of fun. But their staging of The Mikado makes those standards seem a bit modest. The show, a reprise of their 2015 production, opens Friday evening and features some instruments Gilbert and Sullivan may not have imagined when they composed the operetta.

Bernd Thaller / Flickr

Since the Master Singers of Milwaukee was founded more than four decades ago, the group has been committed to highlighting vocal artistry through diverse choral arrangements.

YU TING YANG / Fotolia

This spring will see the return of pop-up restaurants in Milwaukee. While the dining phenomenon has been relatively dormant the past few years, Lake Effect food contributor Kyle Cherek says the area has seen a resurgence. 

Flortentine Opera Company

Mozart’s Don Giovanni - the Don Juan story - is one of the great operas in the Western canon. Many music historians consider it to be one of the greatest operas of all time. Glorious music, an intricate plot and a very satisfying ending have attracted audiences since its premiere in 1787.

Jeffrey Gibson / Haggerty Museum of Art

Native American artist Jeffrey Gibson works in a number of different media, from oil paint to assemblage and photography.

Casper Zoethout / Flickr

Nationalist political parties are on the rise in Europe. While the party platform specifics differ between countries, these radical right-wing, populist movements tend to be anti-immigration, anti-European Union and favor economic protectionism.

Unlike broader political movements like fascism and socialism, populism - on either side of the political spectrum - essentially says those in power don’t have our best interests at heart so we need to get rid of them. Many of the complaints that have surfaced about the established political order will be familiar to Americans.

adamrafferty.com

Finger-style guitar players can run the gamut of genres - from rock to jazz , R&B to country and even classical.  Guitarist Adam Rafferty has a knack for being able to put his own distinctive stamp on many of those genres.

"I pick songs where I feel comfortable with the melody and I know they're winners," says Rafferty. "If something's got a great melody and a great grove, it's a winner."

allexxandarx / Fotolia

If you had an astronomer next to you, what would you ask them? When astronomy contributor Jean Creighton isn't in the Lake Effect studio, she is very much still in the public eye, leading the Manfred Olson Planetarium at UW-Milwaukee. And part of her job is to do research among the public to find out what people are naturally curious about.

Upon occasion Creighton will approach people not as the leader of a planetarium, but as another civilian interested in space, and ask them what they are interested in. Surprisingly, most people want to know about distance.

Museum of Wisconsin Art 2011-213

Even non-art historians might be aware that the artist Georgia O’Keeffe was born and started her painting career in Wisconsin, before moving on to do some of her most famous work in New Mexico.  But another artist did the same thing, though his name is not nearly as well-known.

Nathaniel Davauer / Courtesy of Milwaukee Ballet

Later this week, three world premiere ballet performances will debut on the stage of Milwaukee’s Pabst Theater. The Genesis performances are the results of a competition for choreographers on the rise.

Choreographers submitted samples of their work, and Michael Pink, the Milwaukee Ballet’s artistic director, chose three finalists, who each have three weeks to create a new work for Milwaukee Ballet’s dancers whose names have been chosen at random.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

The Trump Administration appointed former Georgia governor Sonny Perdue as the next Secretary of Agriculture, but for some in the agriculture business the announcement came too late.

The appointment was announced long after every other cabinet member had already been announced, a perceived slight to a community that had overwhelmingly supported Donald Trump during the election. 

djoronimo / Fotolia

Among all the programs in Milwaukee connecting children with the arts, there is perhaps no more remarkable a group than the Latino Arts Strings Program. Based at Latino Arts on Milwaukee’s near south side, the program produces remarkable string players who might not otherwise have access to instruments or high-level music instruction.

Winter is the time of year people in Wisconsin talk about needing to get their vitamin D. The sun is at a lower angle, the clouds loom overhead, and many think it's a given that we're D-deficient. 

But the sun isn't the only way we get vitamin D, a point Dr. Alexander Arnold is making as the featured February speaking for UW-Milwaukee's Science Bag series. Arnold is an associated professor of chemistry and biochemistry at UW-Milwaukee, and will be taking on the science of vitamin D for the series. 

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