Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

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Political analysts around the world are trying to make sense of three ongoing phenomena: the success of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, the adamancy of Bernie Sanders and his supporters, and the Brexit vote in the UK.

There are obviously some key differences between these issues, but writer and Milwaukee native Sandy Tolan thinks there is one major factor at work in nearly all the stories of voter dissatisfaction around the world.  That factor, he says, is globalization. 

marykubica.com

Illinois writer Mary Kubica attracted fans and received plenty of critical praise for her first two suspense novels, The Good Girl and Pretty Baby. And those fans haven’t been disappointed by her latest, either.

Don’t You Cry is the story of a Chicago woman’s sudden disappearance and the unexpected revelations her roommate learns in the search to find out what happened. 

Hugues Argence

Often, our On That Note segment recordings take place with Bonnie North in the Lake Effect studio, and cellist Robert Cohen in some far-flung place where he is performing, either on his own or as part of the Fine Arts Quartet.

However for this edition, Cohen came by the studio with his cello to not only perform some Bach pieces, but talk about their unique qualities.

James Havard / Flickr

Late last month, Wisconsin became one of a handful of states that allow people to rescue people and animals locked in hot cars.  The so-called “Good Samaritan” law is designed to prevent a person with good intentions from incurring a civil penalty for acting.

Joern Pollex / Getty Images

The Fourth of July weekend is almost upon us. You might be packing to travel, or preparing for that huge barbeque you’re planning.

As you check off your to-do list, giving blood is probably not on it. But Chief Madical Officer of the Blood Center of Wisconsin, Dr. Tom Abshire, says it should be.

http://www.villaterracemuseum.org/exhibitions.html

As the French painter Paul Cezanne said, "art is a harmony that is parallel with nature."

In a new three part exhibit, The Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum hopes to harmonize both art and nature. Using its indoor and outdoor spaces to reflect parts of a whole, the museum is showcasing different aspects of the work of Milwaukee-based environmental artist Roy Staab.

Jeff J Mitchell / Getty Images

Last Thursday, voters in the United Kingdom passed a referendum calling for the country to withdraw from the European Union. The Brexit vote has shaken British politics to its core. The world stock markets have largely responded in kind, the value of the British pound has fallen dramatically, and the country has lost its AAA credit rating.

Image courtesy of Larry D'Attilio

Larry D’Attilio has done a little bit of everything.  He’s been a classical musician, an aviator, and an award-winning photographer.

Bonnie North

Once a month, Milwaukee singer-songwriter John Sieger brings friends and fellow musicians into Lake Effect's performance studio to play and chat.

This month, he was joined in studio by Phil Lee to play a song called, “I Apologize for What You Did.”

The idea for the song came from the simple concept of difficult people we encounter in our lives that do not take ownership of their mistakes or faults.

"(For) this (song), I thought about people who do terrible things and expect you to apologize for what you did," Sieger explains.

AUTOMatic

Milwaukee hip hop artist Darius Windom is one half of the duo, AUTOMatic. The group writes its own songs that pay homage to the golden age of hip hop. 

http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/250258/smoke-by-dan-vyleta/

What would our world be like if every emotion we had was visible on our bodies? If our triumphs, but also our indiscretions, were revealed to the naked eye?

Bill Ingalls/NASA

On July 4th, NASA’s Juno spacecraft will enter orbit around Jupiter, and it's been a long time in the making. An Atlas V rocket launched with the Juno spacecraft from Cape Canaveral, Florida on August 5, 2011. It's five-year, 400 million mile voyage to Jupiter will soon have it orbiting the planet to investigate its origin.

Kaleigh Gamache

Auditions. They are a necessary evil in the performing arts. Even in amateur productions, there are almost always too many people for not enough parts. So actors, dancers and singers quickly learn they have about three minutes on stage to make the director or casting agent choose them over the many others also auditioning.

Milwaukee Opera Theatre decided to commission a piece about that experience and the result is Thank You. NEXT? A Reality Opera.

sakhorn38 / Fotolia

In an 8 month series, WUWM looked closely at the issues surrounding mass incarceration of African American men in Milwaukee. The problem affects the community at large, but probably nowhere more so than the people who live in one particular Milwaukee zip code.

Bonnie North

If your idea of accordion music begins and ends with the tunes featured on the Lawrence Welk show, Guy Klucevsek would like to broaden your horizons. He's a world-class accordionist who has founded bands and even entire record labels around the oft-forgotten reed instrument.

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