Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Michelle Owczarski

This year, Milwaukee’s Shakespeare in the Park will no longer be, well, in the park. Instead, the yearly collaboration between Optimist Theatre and Alverno College has found a more sheltered home at the Peck Pavilion at the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, where they will stage Much Ado About Nothing.

HiBrow.tv

On That Note contributor Robert Cohen was finishing a series of concerts with the Fine Arts Quartet here in Milwaukee when he joined Lake Effect for our monthly conversation about making music. This time, he was mulling over a question that a friend of his had asked him after a recent performance: what did he think about when he was playing?

Zach Pietrini Band

Summerfest is underway in the Meier Festival Park along Milwaukee’s lakefront. The annual music festival  brings nearly a million people to town over its run. This year they’ll see major international acts like Paul Simon, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and Pink; but also more local and regional acts who have a chance to showcase themselves at the 50th edition of the Big Gig.

Edyn Herbert

In these heightened political times, how you define yourself as an American is an important and fundamental question. Artists are always responding to difficult questions like this, and a new exhibit at the Walker’s Point Center for the Arts, Transplant Eyes, presents some answers.

anthonydeutschmusic.com

The music of pianist and composer Anthony Deutsch doesn’t fit neatly into any one category. It’s jazz, it’s pop, it’s singer-songwriter. And Deutsch, who grew up in Port Washington but is now based in Milwaukee, embraces all of those labels.

petlyaroman / fotolia

Growing food doesn’t always occur in the country. From city-based commercial operations like Growing Power to personal backyards or even balcony herb and vegetable gardens, urban agriculture in Wisconsin’s largest city is booming.

At the 2016 Academy Awards, the film La La Land won a total of seven Oscars. Two of these awards were for best original score and best song, both created by composer (and former Wisconsinite) Justin Hurwitz. 

They were Hurwitz's first Academy Awards, although he also won Golden Globes and BAFTAs in the same categories. Friday, June 23, and the following Saturday, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra will perform the complete score as the film plays at the Riverside Theatre.

John Flannery / Flickr

This summer, the northern hemisphere sees some pretty spectacular astronomical events. The Perseid meteor showers will peak in mid August and about a week after that, parts of the United States will witness the first total solar eclipse since 1979. It’s also the first one visible from the Pacific ocean to the Atlantic since 1918.

 

From canning to fermenting to dehydrating, Christina Ward is an expert in teaching Milwaukeeans how to preserve food. She says that among the many professional hats she wears, this is the one she’s particularly proud of.

“I’m the master food preserver, which means I’m a volunteer in my community charged with giving people the latest and greatest science,” says Ward.

 

Image courtesy of Body Worlds

There are many animals at the Milwaukee County Zoo you wouldn't normally see in the wilds of Wisconsin.  Camels, for example, or bonobos or giraffes. But an exhibit there on display through Labor Day allows visitors to see those animals and many others in a unique way.

Patrick McMullan / PMC

Susan Silver may have left Milwaukee to follow her dreams in Los Angeles, but she says she's back in full force to discuss her years as a TV comedy writer on The Mary Tyler Moore Show and her escapades in love. Her new memoir, Hot Pants in Hollywood: Sex, Secrets & Sitcoms details her encounters with people like Jim Morrison and Elvis in addition to dishing out advice for women pursuing their dreams. 

Photo courtesy of Sam Moore/MV Times

A new exhibit at the Museum of Wisconsin Art showcases the clothes of six generations of an upper-middle class, Marshfield family -- The Roddis family.

psphotography / Fotolia

From physical ailments to post-traumatic stress disorder - the health issues facing veterans are getting much more attention than they used to. In the Milwaukee area, most of the care veterans of all ages receive happens through the Veterans Administration and the Clement Zablocki VA Medical Center. But the VA doesn’t always go it alone.

Gallery 505 / Facebook

Even if you don’t know his name, you’ve probably seen the artwork of Peter Max. Max is one of the world’s most famous living pop artists. His bright, bold color palette has applied to depict everyone from rock stars to the Statue of Liberty. 

This weekend, Max will be at Gallery 505 in Whitefish Bay to kick off an exhibition of his collected works, which will feature some of his most iconic pieces.

Kati Kokal / 89.7 WUWM

Along with many Lincoln Memorial Drive commuters, architecture critic Tom Bamberger has noticed the near-completion of the Northwestern Mutual Tower. Although apprehensive about previous projects in Milwaukee, Bamberger told Lake Effect's Bonnie North why he thinks this one is a "thoughtful" and "rigorous" stunner. 

"It's really a visual statement," says Bamberger.

In discussing the intentional nature of Milwaukee's newest skyscraper, Bamberger highlights the importance of planning for function and symbolism. 

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