Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Noel Vasquez / Stringer / Getty Images Entertainment

Rob Schrab wasn’t a Hollywood insider when he started his career in the industry, but the Emmy-winning and Oscar nominated writer and director quickly became a "go-to guy" for good work. Monster House, Parks and Recreation, and the Sarah Silverman Program are just a few of the projects he’s had a hand in shaping.

The mass shooting that killed more than two dozen people at a church in rural Texas over the weekend was the latest in a string of such shootings in this country. From Texas to Las Vegas to Charleston and Newtown, mass shootings shock and outrage Americans.

But journalist Gary Younge says there is another trend that should be just as disturbing - the deaths of children from gun violence every day.

Austin Bean

Mayfield, Wisconsin native Joe Kinosian met his writing partner Kellen Blair at a musical theater writer’s workshop in 2008.  It wasn't long until their successful two man murder-mystery musical comedy, Murder for Two, was born. The show debuted in Chicago in 2011 and has basically remained in production ever since.

image courtesy Ben Feringa

The Industrial Revolution of the 1800s ushered in a new era of large motors that continued for more than a century.  But for the last couple of decades, a revolution in nanotechnology has begun to supplant that earlier engineering work.

Bonnie North

Cellist Robert Cohen joins Lake Effect each month in a series we call On That Note. We talk about everything from travel challenges to how to memorize music as we explore the life of a professional classical musician.

We’re changing it up a bit this month because this time Robert was able to bring along his Fine Arts Quartet colleague, violist Juan-Miguel Hernandez. And when you have such high caliber musicians in your studio, talking is good (and we do chat a bit after the music), but a concert is better.

Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

At last report from the Interagency Fire Center, two significant wildfires continue to burn in California. They’ve already charred more than 111-thousand acres. And while the threat to life and property is dying down, the effects of California’s wildfire season this year will not soon be forgotten.

The fires killed people and had a potentially devastating effect on the Napa Valley region, where many of the country’s finest wines are produced from grapes grown there. But Lake Effect contributor Ray Fister says the wineries are still open for business. 

Feast of Crispian

In a neon-lit rehearsal room in the basement of the UW-Milwaukee theatre building, a troupe of actors is blocking a scene from Othello. As Shakespeare’s words fill the room, you begin to notice the unit patches on the actors' jackets, the pins on hats.

NASA/COBE Science Team / Wikimedia

John Mather shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2006 for his work with the Cosmic Background Explorer, or COBE. Launched in 1989, the satellite was instrumental in developing our understanding of cosmic microwave background radiation.

So, what is that? 

"The cosmic background is the sort of light and heat that come to us from all directions, way out there from the distant universe. So not coming from objects, but from whatever is really, way farther beyond that," Mather explains. 

Mark Frohna

The Milwaukee Ballet is opening its season with a production of artistic director Michael Pink’s adaptation of Puccini’s La Boheme. But just recently, the Milwaukee Ballet performers could be be seen on another stage in town, working with the Florentine Opera in their production of The Merry Widow

Pink says working with other artistic organizations in Milwaukee is an opportunity to introduce audiences to everything the city has to offer. 

Audrey Nowakowski

For the inaugural Lake Effect On-Site, the team headed to the Rafters Room at Three Cellars in Oak Creek. The conversation focused on this southern Milwaukee County community's rapid growth. 

Looking around modern Oak Creek, the huge developments taking place would have come as a surprise to the people who called the area home a hundred years ago. In fact, Oak Creek wasn’t even incorporated as a city until the 1950s.

Black Violin / Facebook

Classical music can have an elitist reputation. The conventional repertoire is based almost exclusively on the work of western European white men, and the typical audiences for those works are largely older, and also white. But the duo Black Violin thinks the music of Bach is sublime and want to bring it to people who might not otherwise hear it.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab

It’s been a big couple of years for gravity and the people who study it. Astronomy contributor Jean Creighton joins Lake Effect each month to talk about space - near, far, and in between each month.

This month, the director of UWM's Manfred Olson Planetarium discusses the collision of two neutron stars and the global effort behind capturing the event. “There were seventy telescopes that were able to observe in all continents, including Antarctica, across all light ways from gamma rays all the way to radio. Everybody saw it."

Frank Walsh

Dance is perhaps the cruelest art form. The physical toll on the body is immense. Most professional dancers, who probably started dance classes in elementary school, have begun second careers by their early 30s.

But we retain the ability to move into old age, even if it's limited. So why should expressive and artistic movement be limited to the young?

Janna / Fotolia

October is prime apple picking season in Wisconsin. Orchards not far at all from Milwaukee’s city center allow people to pick their own and for many families doing so is a rite of passage.

Wisconsin Foodie host and food contributor, Kyle Cherek, is all about good food. And he says apples certainly qualify.

"Wisconsin is an ideal place to grow these things between our sun, between our good soil, between our great source of water and then the crisp nights," explains Cherek. "We're really ideal for this things that came from the other side of the world originally."

Renaissance Theaterworks Facebook

The stated mission of Tonia Sina’s organization, Intimacy Directors International, is to “create safe places for dangerous work." The dangerous work in question is intimacy on stage, which at first glance might not seem terribly dangerous. But if not handled correctly, intimate scenes can place actors in awkward, uncomfortable, or even abusive situations - even when no malice was intended.

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