Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Tom Davenport

While the dancers get most of the notice in a performance of Swan Lake, the music they dance to is no slouch either.

Written by Pyotr Illyich Tchaikovsky in 1875-76, the score for Swan Lake is still one of the most popular classical pieces of music in history. The music is lush, passionate, and Tchaikovsky at his most romantic.

Mark Frohna

Urinetown, The Musical won three Tony Awards for best book, score, and direction of a musical in 2002. It's a very tuneful satire that takes on our legal system, social responsibility or lack thereof, corporate greed and mismanagement, and musical theatre itself.

Craig A. Mullenbach / Fotolia

There have been astronomers in Wisconsin for a long time. There’s the Yerkes Observatory near Lake Geneva. There are astronomy programs at places like UWM and UW-Madison. And even a private observatory up in the Northwoods.

But astronomy contributor Jean Creighton tells Lake Effect’s Bonnie North that well before European settlers landed in the area, Wisconsin's Native Americans were already studying the night sky.

Mohamed Amin

It’s hard to overstate what a prolific photojournalist Mohamed Amin was in his relatively short life. When the Kenyan native died in 1996, he left behind 2.5 million still photographs and more than 5,000 hours of raw video, shot during his 33-year career. Until now, almost none of that work has been displayed in the United States.

Alain Elorza / Flickr

One of the luminaries of French cuisine died early this year. Paul Bocuse is credited with basically introducing American diners to French cuisine, and demystifying it. He also launched or mentored the careers of many American chefs, including Milwaukee’s own Paul Bartolotta. 

Bartolotta is the restaurateur behind Bacchus, Lake Park Bistro, and Ristorante Bartolotta. He joined food historian and Lake Effect contributor, Kyle Cherek, to talk about Bocuse's legacy with Lake Effect's Bonnie North. 

Coutesy of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

The viola, like the accordion and the banjo, is often the butt of musical jokes. Not as dramatic as its string cousins the violin or the cello, the viola nevertheless has a beautiful sound and is a crucial part of orchestras and chamber music ensembles.

Andy Stenz

Milwaukee’s Bel Canto Chorus has been making music for almost 90 years. The organization offers local singers a chance to perform a wide choral repertoire at a high standard.

As a part of the community in which it performs, the group has always presented concerts that reflect on current events. This Wednesday’s concert, The Immigrant Story, is no exception.

Grohmann Museum / facebook.com

Wallace Abbey captured images of trains and how railroads played a role in shaping large cities for decades, beginning in the 1940s.  And in doing that, the late photographer chronicled not just how the railroad industry changed over 70 years, but how our culture shifted.

Abbey, who died in 2014, was a longtime Milwaukee-based photographer and an editor at Trains magazine in the 1950s.

HIBROW.TV

What do you know about Bulgaria? Most of us, if we have any thoughts about it, think of a dark mysterious place behind the Iron Curtain. And though democracy came to Eastern Europe in the 1990s, Bulgaria still brings to mind a place largely closed off from the modern developed world.

Of course, that's not exactly the case in 2018. It’s a place where cellist Robert Cohen recently performed, and for this month’s On That Note segment, he joins Bonnie North to talk about the experience. Cohen says he was actually excited to be back in that part of the world.

Dave Holland

Dave Holland stands shoulder to shoulder among other jazz giants like Miles Davis, Chick Corea, Stan Getz, and Hank Jones. In his five decade career, Holland has played and recorded with all of them, and many others.

trahko / Fotolia

Black holes have a bad reputation.  The line is that they’re so dense, not even light can escape, and many of us imagine being pulled inexorably toward an enormous vacuum cleaner or a drain with no hope of escape.

The truth is a little more nuanced than that.  And we know much more about them today because of the Hubble Space Telescope. 

"The Hubble Space Telescope gave us the first concrete evidence of the existence of a super massive black hole in another galaxy," notes astronomy contributor and director of the Manfred Olson Planetarium at UW-Milwaukee, Jean Creighton.

Image Courtesy of University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections

Fourteen years before Lewis and Clark crossed the North American continent to "discover" the Pacific Ocean, Scottish fur trader and explorer Alexander Mackenzie did it in what is now northern Canada.

Bonnie North

Raise your hand if this is how your typical Friday night goes: If you aren’t ill or out of town, you are probably somewhere like the North Shore American Legion Post 331 in Shorewood. You might be meeting friends after a long week at work. You’re probably there for a beer or an old fashioned (make mine a brandy sour, please). And, you are definitely there enjoying a fish fry.

Our beloved fish fry is what makes Friday nights extra special in Milwaukee – and around the entire state of Wisconsin.

The meal most likely consists of cabbage, rye bread, potato, and fish.

digidreamgrafix / Fotolia

The last time wine contributor Ray Fister joined Lake Effect's Bonnie North, he talked about the impact that a historically bad wildfire season in California was having on the wine grape industry.

It’s been several months since those fires, and Fister says, "It's amazing how things have come back" in the Napa and Sonoma regions.

Wisconsin Academy of Sciences Arts And Letters

Humans have visually oriented brains. Our vision evolved to help us survive predators and also helped us capture our dinner. As Shiela Reaves says, our vision evolved to help us defeat camouflage.

Reaves is a professor of Life Sciences at UW-Madison, and a member of the UW McPherson Eye Research Institute.

But today there is a different stress on our vision. We are bombarded by images. Some of us look at computer screens all day, absorbing the pictures Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and other apps offer us. We watch many hours of television.

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