Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

socksinthefryingpan.com

The last band we had in for Irish Fest this year was Co. Claire's trio Flash in the Pan, made up of brothers Shane and Fiachra Hayes and Aodan Coyne. This is the band's second year at Irish Fest and their second year as a formal band.

webanjo3.com

Back in 2012 we had a brand-new band play for us in the Lake Effect studio. We Banjo 3 was here as part of Irish Fest's exploration of how Irish traditional music influenced American bluegrass and vice versa. It was the band's first appearance in America, and our interview that year was their first radio interview as a band.

dallahanmusic.com

One of the bands we had in the studio this year during Irish Fest is the Scottish band Dallahan. The band is made up of Balázs Harmann (double-bass), Paddy Callaghan (button accordion), Ciarán Ryan (banjo/mandolin/fiddle), Jani Lang (fiddle), and Jack Badcock (guitar/vocals).

Suzanne Plunkett / lizcarroll.com

Fiddler Liz Carroll has won just about every musical accolade there is to be had. Her parents immigrated to Chicago from Ireland in the 1950s and Carroll began playing as a child.

She won the Senior All-Ireland Championship when she was 18, has recorded with almost every luminary in the Celtic music pantheon, was nominated for a Grammy award in the Irish traditional category – the first time for an American musician – and she’s played for the President of the United States.

blogocram / Flickr

It’s not often we get a concert harp in the Lake Effect performance studio. So when Lauren Hayes wrote to say she was back in Wisconsin to give a performance, we jumped at the chance to have her in to perform.

Hayes is from Whitewater and countertenor Patrick Terry is from Janesville. They're both about to go into the second year of their masters' degree programs at the Royal Academy of Music in London. And London is where they first met despite having grown up very near each other.

pamelaford.net

At first glance, the Irish potato famine of 1846 is an unlikely setting for a romance novel. But for Wauwatosa’s Pamela Ford, the Great Famine gave her a rich historical setting in which to set her fictional characters.

Theater RED / https://www.theaterred.com/

American theatre  in the 1870s was much different than what theatregoers, and the actors themselves, experience today.

One influential actor from the 19th Century was Edwin Booth. Considered the father of American acting in theatre circles, Booth was supremely successful in his time. He was a member of the original royal family of American theatre, which included his father Junius and brother, the notorious John Wilkes Booth. Local actress and playwright Angela Iannone has already written and produced three plays about the great 19th Century American actor.

Courtesy of the Artist / Racine Art Museum

The Racine Art Museum is known for its somewhat quirky rotating exhibits alongside its more serious collection of sculpture, pottery and paintings.

Two temporary exhibits that are very different from each other in nature opened earlier this summer. One explores science fiction and fantasy-based themes of Doctor Who, Star Wars, superheroes, and steampunk, while the other showcases the work of familial artists—couples, parents and children, and siblings.

Milwaukee is a divided city in many ways, but in Belfast of the 1970s, the divisions were deep, formal and violent. 

Northern Ireland author Tony Macaulay grew up in Belfast and wrote about his experiences as a young man coming of age in a trilogy of memoirs - Paperboy, Bread Boy, and the latest, All Growed Up. 

Despite the violent background, the books are funny and touch on universal themes. 

irishfest.com

The ethnic festival season continues next week with the nation’s largest Irish heritage festival.  

Before the 35th annual Irish Fest kicks off, Lake Effect connects with Ed Ward and John Maher, who have been with Irish Fest since before there was an Irish Fest. They’re part of the longtime Milwaukee traditional Irish band, Blarney, which started six years before the festival began in 1981.

CPS

As summer winds down, practice may be far removed from the minds of music students. But practice does make perfect, and it is the art of repetition and fine-tuning a sound that adds up to a great musician.

Cellist Robert Cohen says, "Feeling of having done more than you've expected to do...you somehow are able to be more expressive than the effort you're putting in to it. It just seems to pour out of you."

Maccabi Games / Facebook.com

Starting next week, Milwaukee will be host city to the 33rd JCC Maccabi Games - one of the largest youth athletic competitions in the world. The competition will have roughly 1,000 Jewish youth from around the world competing in over 15 various sporting events over five days.

"It’s about an exciting, engaging event for five days, with kids from all over the world," says director of the Jewish Community Center Maccabi Games, Jesse Rosen.

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Every month, Lake Effect's Bonnie North chats with the director of UWM’s Manfred Olson Planetarium, Jean Creighton. From viewing constellations to what it takes to land on a comet to exoplanets, they've talked about a wide range of astronomical topics.

Rather than taking place in the studio, this month's AstroChat segment was recorded at the planetarium in front of an audience of WUWM listeners.

Creighton shared her experience of traveling to the Stratosphere, spending 20 hours there to observe young and middle aged stars with an infrared telescope.

Milos Bicanski / Getty Images

A lot has happened in foreign policy this past month. The Greek economic crisis continues and the International Monetary Fund is warning of a gloomy outlook for the Eurozone; the Iran nuclear arms deal has been accepted by all parties; and the United States and Cuba continue to move ever closer to normal diplomatic relations after decades.

In addition, President Obama has been on a state visit to Africa since last Friday. Foreign policy contributor Art Cyr comments on the President's message to Africa and the many other recent events underway across the Atlantic:

nathanielstern.com

Nathaniel Stern's intensity is palpable. The media artist always has multiple bodies of work going on simultaneously, he's a Fulbright scholar, a professor of art, a parent.  Talking with him, you get the impression he never stops thinking about, or exploring, art and life.

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