Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Winter is the time of year people in Wisconsin talk about needing to get their vitamin D. The sun is at a lower angle, the clouds loom overhead, and many think it's a given that we're D-deficient. 

But the sun isn't the only way we get vitamin D, a point Dr. Alexander Arnold is making as the featured February speaking for UW-Milwaukee's Science Bag series. Arnold is an associated professor of chemistry and biochemistry at UW-Milwaukee, and will be taking on the science of vitamin D for the series. 

Voices Found Repertory / Facebook

In Milwaukee's well-established theater scene, Voices Found Repertory is one of the new kids on the block. The material they generally present, however, dates back nearly five centuries. 

The group specializes in Shakespeare, but also presents some new works as well as some commissioned from playwrights.

Alec Lachman, one of the founding members, says this specialization was the inspiration for creating Voices Found. 

CPS

Every month, Lake Effect talks with cellist Robert Cohen about life as a professional musician in the On That Note series.

When we spoke last month, Cohen was on his way to Finland to participate in a brand new festival on music and wellness. Since then, his own wellness has been tested by the constant traveling that often comes with a musician's work. 

Official Ko-Thi Dance Company / Facebook

 

It’s been nearly 50 years since Ferne Caulker founded the Milwaukee-based African dance company called Ko-Thi. The company marks its fifth generation and its return to the stage after 9 years of rebuilding with its performance of Vibrations: Rhythmic Motion.

Courtesy of Mariela Sancari

This weekend, the Pitch Project Gallery in Walker's Point is putting the book front and center, as both an object and an art form.

The Pitch Project Artist Book Fair event is connected to its latest exhibition - photographer Mariela Sancari’s “Moises/Landscape."

The name T Bone Burnett is almost synonymous with the word legendary. You could also use the words innovative, brilliant and visionary.

Burnett catapulted into the public consciousness with the soundtrack from the Coen Brother’s film O Brother, Where Art Thou?, but writer Lloyd Sachs says Burnett had been hugely influential years before that movie came out - both as a producer and as a singer / songwriter in his own right.

Every month, Milwaukee singer-songwriter John Sieger comes to the Lake Effect performance studio to play a song with friends and fellow musicians. 

This month, Sieger will be performing at Boswell Book Company at an event for the book T. Bone Burnett: A Life in Pursuit. The book looks at the life of legendary music producer and singer-songwriter, T Bone Burnett. 

Milwaukee writer Lesley Kagen has been a regular guest on Lake Effect ever since her first novel, Whistling in the Dark, was published a decade ago. In these past 10 years, Kagen has published another 7 novels, most set in Wisconsin and Milwaukee.

Hubble Site

Many are familiar with the concept of citizen science: opportunities for amateurs to play a role in helping researchers gather or process scientific data. That could involve a backyard bird count, or the use of a home computer to sift through terrabytes of data.

Nina Subin

Ayad Akhtar was sitting in the Starbucks near the corner of West Blue Mound Road and Highway 100 in late 2008 when the idea came to him - a play about relationships, Muslim-American identity and the immigrant experience in the United States, and what all of it might look like 10 years after 9/11. Those early notes became the powerful play Disgraced.

The beginning of a new year has most of us thinking about ways to improve our lives. Whether it’s losing weight, learning something new, getting in shape, or decluttering our homes, January seems to be the time we strive to make things better.

Classical musicians aren’t immune to that impulse. Cellist Robert Cohen chats with us each month in a series we call On That Note, and he’s been thinking about well-being:

Robert Cohen is the cellist for the Milwaukee-based Fine Arts Quartet and his On That Note segments are a regular Lake Effect feature.

Renaissance Theaterworks

Since its inception, Renaissance Theaterworks has specialized in productions that pay particular attention to women writers, cast and crew.  Luna Gale, their newest offering opening Friday night, is no exception.

Written by Rebecca Gilman and directed by Mary McDonald-Kerr, the play explores a basic question - who decides who is best able to raise a child?

Milwaukee Opera Theater

Milwaukee Opera Theatre is known for doing a lot with very little money. They showcase talented artists in a way that belies their limited resources. From new works to inventive re-imaginings of opera and operetta classics, an Milwaukee Opera Theatre show is guaranteed to be a deeply pleasurable artistic experience.

Clare Peterson / Marquette

As President Obama prepares to give the final press conference of his presidency on Wednesday, NPR's Michel Martin is looking towards the next Administration with a wary - but not entirely pessimistic - eye.

"I've just never been a fan of being mad in advance," the weekend host of All Things Considered says, "or being afraid in advance.  I think you give people the benefit of the doubt until they give you a reason to think otherwise."

For thirty-five years, Ed Block taught English at Marquette University. And though he continues at the university as a professor emeritus, his current work is more rooted in the writing world. 

The Milwaukee poet's new collection is called Anno Domini. Like much of Block's work, his new collection explores religious themes and references his Catholic beliefs.

Block believes that many poets - even those who don't ascribe to a particular religion - use spirituality as a source for their writing. 

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