Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Christine / Fotolia

Although ballet dancers begin training quite young, their professional lives are often short. Most dancers have moved on to another career by the time they’re in their mid-30s. But when you’ve spent hours a day in class and rehearsal since you were a child, it’s hard to imagine yourself doing something else.

Fortunately for the dancers at the Milwaukee Ballet, they have a resource to help them. The Milwaukee Dancers’ Fund, Inc. exists to help dancers transition from being full-time performers into other careers.

Earlier this week, Milwaukee Magazine and Lake Effect kicked off a new, monthly live conversation series. This month’s MilMag Live! event focused on two topics. The first of those was the influence of insiders and outsiders in shaping Milwaukee.

The discussion was led by Lake Effect's Mitch Teich and Carole Nicksin from Milwaukee Magazine. One of the areas of richest discussion was what brings people to Milwaukee, and what drives them away. 

The panel included: 

For someone who is not himself a combat veteran, Milwaukee writer Nick Petrie sure gets it.

Last year, his debut novel, The Drifter, came out to great acclaim. The book was a thriller, and featured fictional Wisconsin native Peter Ash, a veteran of multiple tours of duty with the Marines in Afghanistan and Iraq. And while he made it back to Wisconsin sound in body, his mind was less intact.

Syda Productions / Fotolia

A visit to the doctor’s office can sometimes be an uncomfortable experience - both physically and psychologically. 

Doug Bradley, Craig Werner

The Vietnam War marked a turning point in American history. The war took place during a time of turbulent social change – the 1960s and early 70s saw huge strides in women’s rights and civil rights. The country also witnessed the assassinations of a president, a presidential hopeful, a civil rights icon and the killing of unarmed protestors at Kent State by National Guardsmen.

LMspencer / Fotolia

Sean Carroll is the Alan Wilson Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics at UW-Madison, and author of the new book, The Serengeti Rules: The Quest to Discover How Life Works and Why It Matters. His book uses true stories of scientific discovery to explain how scientists connected the dots and came to understand that all of life is interconnected. 

AroesteGeneralPR / saraharoeste.com

The Latino Arts Center offered Milwaukee audiences the rare opportunity to hear a musician performing in a language that is considered to be endangered.

Hal Leonard

One of the hallmarks of jazz is that its players know how to improvise. So it would seem that the idea of teaching improvisation is a contradiction in terms.

Noel Spirandelli

In an 8 month series, WUWM looked closely at the issues surrounding mass incarceration of African American men in Milwaukee. The problem affects the community at large, but probably nowhere more so than the people who live in one particular Milwaukee zip code.

R. Hurt/Caltech-JPL / NASA

As 2016 draws to a close, Manfred Olson Planetarium at UW-Milwaukee director and Lake Effect contributor Jean Creighton highlights the important astronomy stories of the past year:

Highlights of 2016:

1. Discovery of Gravitational Waves

Offset lithograph Collection of La Cinémathèque française, A042-94

Most people who consider themselves film buffs have seen or at least know of the classic silent films, Metropolis and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.  But the German Expressionist movement that they were a part of has a much broader sweep than just those two titles.

Bonnie North

Both Canadian fiddler April Verch and North Carolina-based singer and multi-instrumentalist Joe Newberry have some serious musical chops.

Verch was last on Lake Effect in 2012 with her Ottawa Valley/American bluegrass/Appalachian hybrid band The April Verch Trio. She is the winner of multiple fiddle championships and the owner of many musical awards for her fiddling and singing and step-dancing.

Courtesy of Rafael Salas

Wisconsin-born artist Rafael Salas grew up on a farm. And those rural landscapes still find their way into his paintings and installations. But so does a lot more, as he explores many genres of art with his students at Ripon College and in his own studio.

Thames and Kosmos

Every December since 2010, Lake Effect has been joined by writer and game expert James Lowder. He is the  editor of the award-winning essay anthologies Hobby Games: The 100 Best, and Family Games: The 100 Best.

During 2016, Lowder noticed three trends in the gaming world:

Jonathan Kirn

Mark Niehaus couldn't be more emphatic. The president and executive director of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra leans into the microphone and makes eye contact across the desk: "This is not a vanity project. This is not, oh the acoustics are great and we really want to play somewhere that sounds better. That happens to be true, but that's not the driving force behind it."

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