Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of MIAD

The Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design has a long history of connecting art students with industry. MIAD's signature program is the industrial design major, whose students have gone on to work for everyplace from GE Healthcare to Johnson Controls and companies around the world.

Christine Carr is about to graduate with a degree in industrial design, and her senior thesis features two projects that have one key inspiration in common: Carr’s six-year-old daughter, Lilly who has autism and is nonverbal.

Mikki Schaffner / Milwaukee Rep

If you ever had an English literature class, it’s very likely you read the Charlotte Bronte classic Jane Eyre.  The mid-19th century novel of class, madness and love is one of the defining works of the canon.  There have been many adaptations on stage and screen, and a very recent one is now on stage at the Milwaukee Rep through May 21.

Tom Bamberger

Tom Bamberger is one of Milwaukee's leading architectural and public space critics. But he's also a nationally acclaimed photographer, who recently donated more than 400 of his works to the Museum of Wisconsin Art in West Bend. 

"My artwork was a refuge from myself, that's what saved me. That was the drug," says Bamberger. 

Kathy Wittman

This weekend, the Florentine Opera closes out its 2016-2017 season with one of the most beloved operas of all-time, Rossini’s The Barber of Seville. It’s one of the prime examples of the Bel Canto, or "beautiful singing", style of opera. And like many the operatic comedies of the day, it’s full of farce, quick changes, funny props, and slapstick.

Express Yourself MKE

Express Yourself Milwaukee has been part of Milwaukee's arts education scene since 2003.  The group works with area kids that are out of the mainstream education system. In partnership with Running Rebels, the organization also engages with kids through arts activities, from drumming and dancing to visual arts and  music.

John Glembin

Normally, the temporary exhibition space houses in the Calatrava Wing of the Milwaukee Art Museum showcases artworks from well beyond Milwaukee’s borders. We’ve seen furniture from early 19th century Vienna, films from 1930s Germany and Impressionist paintings from mid to late 19th century France. But since March, the space has been home to a cornucopia of art that usually lives elsewhere in town.

courtesy of Robert Cohen

Lake Effect talks with cellist Robert Cohen every month about the life of a working classical musician in our regular segment, called On That Note

All of us in the work world face the inevitable push-pull of our home and work lives. But when that tension is present during a rehearsal or a performance, Cohen says there are some unique challenges, like using it as a way to go deeper into the music.

Mark Lacy

This weekend in Milwaukee, the Wisconsin Fellowship of Poets holds its annual conference. Most of it is a private affair, but the noteworthy exception is the public reading by one of the nation’s most-honored poets, Mark Doty.

Present Music

Milwaukee’s Present Music not only pushes boundaries musically, but also when it comes to the spaces they perform. Saturday’s concert finds the group performing amongst the dioramas and artifacts of the Milwaukee Public Museum.

Present Music's exploratory concert, Time, Nature, Culture, Soundwill take audience members through the museum to experience performances on every floor.

ROUNDTURNERPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

How many of you feel math passed you by once you got beyond arithmetic? It's a feeling many of us have. Dr. Eugenia Cheng says too many of us.

sakkmesterke / Fotolia

Every month, contributor Jean Creighton joins Lake Effect to talk about things astronomical. This month, the topic was prompted by two people asking her the same question within twelve hours.

"People are intrigued by black holes," Creighton says. "They want to know what they are, how they work - but on the other hand they (don't want the myth broken)."

Creighton explains the science of black holes and breaks some common myths, as well as the black hole bubble we may be living in:

Thomas Mohr Photography

Tuesday, April 25 would have been Ella Fitzgerald’s 100th birthday. The woman known as the first lady of song and the queen of jazz had a pure tone, impeccable diction, phrasing and intonation, and what’s been described as a "horn-like" ability to improvise. And while she wasn’t the first jazz singer to scat, she elevated it to a high art.

Moriah Bame

On Monday, April 10th, the back room at Colectivo on Prospect avenue was home to a very spirited discussion between 5 Wisconsin radio talk show hosts, two moderators, and the studio audience.

It was the fourth in a series of community events called MilMag Live!, produced by Milwaukee Magazine and Lake Effect. This month’s topic was based on a feature story by the magazine’s managing editor Tom Tolan called, "Do We Even Need Talk Radio Anymore?"

Dan Mullen, flickr

Phil Lapayowker has noticed a distinct lack of what some people unkindly call ‘flying rats’ in Milwaukee.

"I was listening to a podcast and they were talking about animals in cities and stuff, and they ended with 'Do you know what color a pigeon’s eyes are?' and I was like, I have no idea!" he says. "So I’ll go look for one, or when I’m walking I’ll see one I’m sure. And I’ve never run into one in Milwaukee… I mean it’s kind of crazy. You go to other cities like Chicago and they’re everywhere."

In Tandem Theatre

American composer and songwriter Bob Merrill is probably best known for the Barbra Streisand mega-hit Funny Girl, which opened on Broadway in 1964. But before that, in 1961, he debuted Carnival!

Based on an earlier film starring Leslie Caron, the show ran over 700 performances on Broadway before it closed in 1963. Some of its songs include Rum Ticky Ticky Tum Tum, Always, Always You and Love Makes The World Go ‘Round.

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