Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Dasha Petrenko / Fotolia

There have been a lot articles written, and a lot of interviews conducted, about how millenials are shaping life in the U.S. and Milwaukee in particular.

Our discussions of real estate and residential patterns, public transit, employment, and even shopping delve into the newest generation of adults who call Milwaukee home. Gen X-er and Wisconsin Foodie host, Kyle Cherek, says we should add food and food culture to that list. 

The Milwaukee Mandolin Orchestra is the oldest fretted orchestra in the country, and possibly the world. It's perhaps no surprise then, that the group will be performing an ambitious concert which includes a first for a mondolin orchestra - the complete "Four Seasons Suite" by Antonio Vivaldi.

Mark Frohna

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton often get much of the credit for the women’s suffragist movement in this country in the 19th Century. And while they are due all the credit they get, there’s a name that is not as well-known and whose efforts have been minimized, often intentionally.

Victoria Woodhull was the first woman to run for President of the United States, in 1872, decades before women could vote in this country. She also started numerous successful business and was involved in some of the biggest scandals of the day. 

NASA / Wikimedia

Saturn has 62 moons. One of them is Enceladus, which on first glance doesn’t look like much – kind of like a huge galactic golf ball. But this small moon, about the size of England, is a lot more interesting that you might imagine. Enceladus provides almost all of the material that makes up Saturn's E Ring. 

"It turns out that this whole ring is material that came, ultimately, from the moon itself," says astronomy contributor, Jean Creighton. 

Theatre RED / facebook.com

At a time when only men were allowed to have adventures, some 18th century women had other ideas.

Milwaukee’s Theatre RED produces the world premiere of local playwright Liz Shipe’s Bonny Anne Bonny. It's a female pirate adventure based on real people - Anne Bonny and Mary Read. "It's highly fictionalized...we use the ideas and the spirit of these characters, but we use them to tell this really fun high seas adventure story," explains Shipe.

Niki Johnson

The feminist icon Gloria Steinem was in Milwaukee earlier this month to celebrate the 80th anniversary of the organization Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin. Milwaukee artist Niki Johnson was a part of the event, unveiling a new work called, “Hills and Valleys.”

The piece is constructed from signs collected from now-shuttered Planned Parenthood offices around the state, which have been defunded by the current gubernatorial administration. 

Cavan Images / Fotolia

For all the attention scientists and others have paid to climate change, the issue has hardly registered during this year’s Presidential campaign. Even when it has surfaced in American politics, the debate is often not about what to do about it but whether it exists at all.

Doctor Ben Santer is an atmospheric scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and has recently begun traveling to the Juneau Icefield in Alaska to examine, first-hand, the impact of climate change. He says the science is irrefutable – climate change is happening. 

Itzhak Andres / Wikimedia

The rise of digitization has made archiving and sharing scholarly information much easier than it once was, especially for subjects with a selective appeal. Such is the case with Yiddish theater.

The Yiddish theater flourished in 19th and early 20th Century Europe and, towards the end of its heyday, in the United States. The subject matter ranged from the humorous, to the melodramatic or even political. No matter the central topic, Yiddish theater was wildly popular for Jewish audiences around the world.

Renaissance Theaterworks

The plot reads like something out of a tabloid. Over the course of three years, three women all marry the same man. Not at the same time, of course. But they befall the same fate - murdered for their trouble. The fact that this is a true story just adds to the intrigue.

Renaissance Theatreworks opens their season with The Drowning Girls, based on the true stories of "The Brides in the Bath" murders in England, during the early 1900s. 

Chris Ranson / Lakefront Brewery

A UWM professor has teamed up with Milwaukee’s Lakefront Brewery to recreate an Iron Age brew, inspired by evidence her team uncovered in an archaeological dig.

Nathaniel Davauer

As the Milwaukee Ballet prepares to open its 47th season with a new production of Scheherazade, audiences will see a new dancer on stage in the role of "The Moon Prince." Jonathan Batista comes to Milwaukee from the Cincinnati Ballet.

Beth Lipman

Glass artist Beth Lipman is known far and wide for her detailed, overlapping glass installations that appear to drop over the edges of tables and look as though they could fall over with a puff of wind. Her work is in permanent collections at the Smithsonian and the Milwaukee Art Museum, among other places.

Devin Pedde

One of public radio’s flagship shows is beginning a new chapter. Chris Thile officially begins his tenure as the host of A Prairie Home Companion with Saturday evening’s broadcast live from the Fitzgerald Theatre in St. Paul, Minnesota.

The show was created by Garrison Keillor in 1974. And except for a few years in the late 80s and early 90s, Keillor has remained its face and voice. But last year Keillor announced his retirement and the transition to the new host began.

The Marion Consort / Facebook

The early 13th century was a time when Western music was beginning to experiment with harmony singing and with pieces heard outside the context of a church mass. And its in this period that we find the repertoire for a concert coming to Milwaukee this weekend. 

digboston / Flickr

A pretty special concert tour is rolling into Milwaukee. Steve Earle, Buddy Miller, Robert Plant and others are all on the same bill to perform and raise awareness and money for refugees around the world. The tour is called LAMPEDUSA and it benefits Jesuit Refugee Service’s Global Education Initiative.

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