Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

new-york-city / Flickr

Why are we so driven by smells and tastes of delicious, delectable foodstuffs, like mom's homemade lasagna? And, for that matter, why do we have an emotional connection to it?

Not too long ago, Lake Effect contributor Kyle Cherek, host of the Emmy-winning public television show Wisconsin Foodie, gave a TEDx talk discussing these queries, focusing on the intersection between flavor, history and memory.

Courtesy of Deb Brehmer

Della Wells was one of two people Milwaukee named as 'Artists of the Year' in 2016, and all you have to do is look at the scope and range of her body of work to understand why.

From large-scale paintings and collages to pillow dolls that would fit in your pocket, the Milwaukee native explores her blackness and her gender through her art.

Marcus Center / Facebook

Chicago’s Second City comedy troupe first opened its doors in 1959, and in the more than half century since, the franchise has made a fine art of improvised sketch comedy. The list of folks who have worked there at some point in their careers reads like a who’s who of American comedy. 

Courtesy of Meg Rosoff

The British newspaper The Times once described Meg Rosoff's literary output thusly: "Searingly well written, her books read like Samuel Beckett on ecstasy." Perhaps best known for her first novel, How I Live Now, Rosoff's books often feature a teenaged protagonist exploring what it means to live in a world not of one's own making.

Wolfgang Gauch

December is the time of year when holiday concerts abound. From big community sings of Handel’s Messiah to Holiday Pops concerts to chamber music and school concerts, the season is awash in sound. 

Cellist and On That Note contributor Robert Cohen’s experience of this month is no exception.  He’s just back from a series of chamber concerts across Europe and told Lake Effect’s Bonnie North that the venues - houses of worship in particular - are what makes these concerts unique.

fullempty / Fotolia

Since the November election, reported incidents of overt hostility towards minorities and immigrants have increased. From physical altercations to poison pen letters and internet comments, some people seem to feel emboldened by the election results to express opinions that are at best unkind and at worst racist, misogynistic or homophobic.

O Palsson / Flickr

It wasn’t too long after the Milwaukee Art Museum opened its renovated galleries a year ago that then director Dan Keegan announced his retirement. The intensive, international search for his successor led to the hiring of Marcelle Polednik, who began her tenure there in August.

US Bureau of Ships / Wikimedia

75 years ago, the Imperial Japanese Air Force bombed the US Naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Although Europe had been engulfed in conflict since 1939, and the Japanese had invaded China even earlier in the decade, the attack on Pearl Harbor was the event that catapulted the United States into the Second World War.

Jenny Plevin

When Black Nativity opened in New York in 1961, Langston Hughes had been a published poet and essayist for 40 years. It was one of the first plays by an African American to be staged off-Broadway. And it has received productions around the country ever since.

Jacobo Lovo

For more than a quarter century, Latino Arts, Inc. has been celebrating Latino culture through music and art. From the Mariachi orchestra made up of local school children, to hosting international musical acts and artists in its facilities within the United Community Center on the near south side, Latino Arts serves as a model for arts education, urban youth development and cultural engagement.

Penguin Random House

Winston Churchill was the prime minister of the United Kingdom during the dark days of World War II. This was during a time when Britain seemed to stand alone against Nazi Germany. Churchill’s leadership is largely credited for keeping up the spirit of the British people, especially during the German air blitz and the allied defeat at the Battle of Dunkirk in 1940.

Michael Brosilow / Milwaukee Rep

For more than four decades, the Milwaukee Rep has presented an annual production of the Dickens classic, A Christmas Carol.  For many of those years, the show has moved from the usual Milwaukee Rep stages to the historic Pabst Theater. This year is no exception.

NASA / mars.nasa.gov

On this day in 1964, the Spacecraft Mariner 4 was launched into its 228 day mission that would bring the spacecraft within about 6,000 miles of Mars. That mission resulted in the first close-up photos of the Red Planet.

In celebration of that historic mission, November 28th is known as Red Planet Day.

"At first, all we wanted to do was learn more about the environment, but now, of course we want to get [to Mars]. We want to send a person there," says astronomy contributor and director of the Manfred Olson Planetarium at UW-Milwaukee, Jean Creighton.

Once a month, Milwaukee singer-songwriter John Sieger brings friends and fellow musicians into Lake Effect's performance studio to play a song.

For the November special edition of The Monthly Beatdown with John Sieger, the singer-songwriter has a Thanksgiving themed song called "No One to Thanks But Myself." 

John Sieger, and a host of other musicians, with “No One to Thank But Myself,” a Thanksgiving edition of The Monthly Beatdown with John Sieger.

Pen Waggener / Flickr

Cranberries are one of the only truly traditional foods present at the Thanksgiving table. While a full-turkey likely wouldn't have been on the menu at the first Thanksgiving, cranberries were a staple part of early American diets. 

Lake Effect food contributor, Kyle Cherek, says the cranberry is one of the only fruits native to North America. The tiny fruit was originally cultivated by Native American tribes in bogs in the Northeast, but eventually made its way to Wisconsin. 

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