Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

neirfy / Fotolia

Jessica Bell was previously featured on Lake Effect for her work as a Milwaukee culinary entrepreneur who is both a wine educator and the developer of a disposable wine glass.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

The Wisconsin primary is tomorrow, and as far as the presidential part of the primary is concerned, Wisconsin is very much still in play.

All of the remaining candidates have spent time over the past week campaigning in the state. And last week’s Marquette University Law School poll suggests that Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz have a slight lead on their respective opponents, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Hugues Argence

Every month, Lake Effect brings you On That Note, a series of conversations with cellist Robert Cohen. The Milwaukee-based Fine Arts Quartet brings Cohen state-side quite often, but he also maintains an apartment in London to accommodate his active solo career.

Recently, he's been working with students in England, introducing them to music as a profession and giving them live performances with his cello. After a recent school visit, Cohen says he was unsure about how the students had received his presentation. 

Photo by Michael Brosilow / Milwaukee Rep

The world premiere of American Song opens tonight at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater. Starring Wisconsin actor James Devita, it is a searing show about how guns touch one man’s life and change it forever.

Written by Australian playwright Joanna Murray-Smith, the show presents the perspective of a gun violence perpetrator's father - one that often gets overshadowed by the voices of victims and survivors of many mass shootings that have occurred in America.

Darren Hauck / Stringer / Getty Images

The Wisconsin primary is only days away, and the state is in national play. Sarah McCammon is covering the 2016 presidential election for  NPR. This week, she's been in Wisconsin reporting on the GOP race and attended a Ted Cruz event and a Donald Trump rally.

At the "Women for Cruz" event in Madison, McCammon explains that Cruz's wife, Heidi; his mother, Eleanor Cruz; and former presidential candidate Carly Fiorina were all in attendance. 

Tom Davenport

The Milwaukee Ballet's latest show, Kaleidoscope Eyes, features the work of three choreographers. There’s Trey McIntyre’s A Day in The Life, which features music by the Beatles; a new work by Genesis 2015 winner Garret Smith called Addendum, and a world premiere called The Sixth Sin, by Timothy O’Donnell.

Milwaukee Share

They were once called “health classes.” But for the past few decades, it’s simply been called sex education. And depending on where you live, it’s an often politically charged topic, especially when it’s part of the curriculum in K-12 schools.

But there’s a case to be made that all of us could use a refresher course, particularly as our situations change over the course of our lives. We get older. We could have a chronic illness that affects our sexual expression. And then, there are the people who don’t fall into the traditional sexual paradigm.

Bonnie North

Today is the third installment of the monthly music series The Monthly Beatdown featuring Milwaukee singer-songwriter John Sieger.

Once a month on Lake Effect, Sieger brings friends and fellow musicians into WUWM's performance studio to play and chat.

This month, his group is composed of fellow R&B Cadets Paul Cebar and Robin Pluer to play Kidnap You Baby.

peresanz / Fotolia

Despite the winter-like conditions to the west of us, we know that warmer weather is on its way. And with warmer weather comes a new spring sky to gaze at.

Astronomy contributor Jean Creighton notes that the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia are circumpolar, or visible in our latitude year round, but will change positions to be closer to the horizon.

ayadakhtar.com

If you studied economics, you know about the “invisible hand.” Adam Smith first used the term in the 18th century to make the case that the self-interest of people in the marketplace does lead to greater benefit for everyone.

'Reading Women'

Mar 22, 2016
Carrie Schneider / Photo courtesy of the Haggerty Museum of Art

The title of the Haggerty Museum’s current exhibit, “Reading Women,” is both literal and figurative.  The large-scale photographic prints, plus a looped video, and a detailed catalog feature women actually reading.  But the exhibition also encourages us to read the women themselves.

scaleupmilwaukee.org

One deterrent to would-be new businesses is the fear of not being prepared in the beginning stages before the company has even made a name for itself.  Scale Up Milwaukee is one local organization working to aid entrepreneurs and innovators at the early stages of their business plan. Its "Scalerator" program is a six-month, seven-session training program that aims to teach business owners how to inject growth into their ventures.

Photo by Bonnie North

Singer Jeannine Rivers has been serenading the Milwaukee area for years. Whether she’s at Caroline’s, the Pfister’s BLU Bar and Lounge or West Bend’s Café Soeurette, her powerful and expressive vocals, along with a mix of jazz standards and original compositions, make her an audience favorite.

Mark Davis

The Wisconsin Conservatory of Music in Milwaukee celebrates the art of jazz this Friday and Saturday.  The Wisconsin Conservatory Jazz Festival features saxophonist Benny Golson, trumpeter Brian Lynch, and the conservatory’s own ensemble, We Six, headed by pianist Mark Davis

bonoboconservation.com

For our Project Milwaukee: Innovation - How Do We Compete? series, the scientific community has been highlighted for its work in both research and practice.

Surgeon James Sanger is particularly noteworthy for his work as a plastic surgeon and a hand surgeon. But his patients are noteworthy, too.

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