Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Tim Fuller

The Milwaukee Rep closes its season with a powerful production of August Wilson’s 1987 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Fences.

Bonnie North

Once a month, Milwaukee singer-songwriter John Sieger brings friends and fellow musicians into Lake Effect's performance studio to play and chat.

For May's The Monthly Beatdown, Sieger is joined only by his alter ego to perform I'm A Big Boy Now.

CPS

Music and love have long been interconnected. And even if a piece or a song is not directly about love, the person performing it has to approach it with an open heart - along with technique and skill.

It’s a familiar refrain for our On That Note contributor, cellist Robert Cohen. 

"From a musician's point of view, we're in that incredible, fortunate position of dealing with this every day of our lives," he says. "But we're equally able to forget how much that love is 90% of what we're doing."

Judy Schmidt / Flickr

Explaining complex concepts or theories to a general audience can be tricky. It's a problem many experts face when trying to describe their work. How do you explain it in a way that makes it understandable, without dumbing it down? 

Longtime Lake Effect contributor Jean Creighton is pretty good at doing that when it comes to astronomy. Not only does she help visitors at the Manfred Olson Planetarium, she's also been helping the Lake Effect team understand how the universe works for almost a decade and.

uwimages/Fotolio

Alverno Presents has made a lasting mark on Milwaukee’s performing arts scene. For 57 years, the presenting organization has worked out of the Alverno College campus to bring innovative modern dance companies, world class jazz, and world music to Milwaukee audiences.

James Beard Foundation / Instagram

The James Beard Awards are only a big deal if you’re a chef, or you’d like to be a chef, or you might eat at a restaurant sometime in your life. 

Dan Massie

The members of the Scottish indie rock band, Frightened Rabbit, are excited to be returning to Milwaukee this week.  They’ll play the Pabst Theatre on Thursday – one of their favorite places to play. The Milwaukee stop is one of many in a stateside tour supporting their new album, Painting of a Panic Attack.

Marcus Center/Patrick Dewane

The Accidental Hero is a one-man show detailing the true story of an American officer in World War II.  It’s written and performed by Patrick Dewane, the grandson of the play’s protagonist.

For years, Dewane would visit his grandparents' house and see WWII memorabilia decorating the house. He would beg his grandfather, Matt Konop, to tell him war stories, but he wouldn't talk.

Konop died in 1983 and Dewane "figured that we buried grandpa with his stories."

Lois Bielefeld / Portrait Society Gallery

The Museum of Wisconsin Art in West Bend is an amazing place for people to learn about and see creations made by notable Wisconsin artists. But the museum is also a tremendous resource for people making art.

Last year, the museum provided an opportunity for its first artist-in-residence abroad, thanks to a partnership with the Ansay Development Corporation. Milwaukee photographer Lois Bielefeld traveled to Luxembourg for the program.

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Jessica Bell was previously featured on Lake Effect for her work as a Milwaukee culinary entrepreneur who is both a wine educator and the developer of a disposable wine glass.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

The Wisconsin primary is tomorrow, and as far as the presidential part of the primary is concerned, Wisconsin is very much still in play.

All of the remaining candidates have spent time over the past week campaigning in the state. And last week’s Marquette University Law School poll suggests that Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz have a slight lead on their respective opponents, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Hugues Argence

Every month, Lake Effect brings you On That Note, a series of conversations with cellist Robert Cohen. The Milwaukee-based Fine Arts Quartet brings Cohen state-side quite often, but he also maintains an apartment in London to accommodate his active solo career.

Recently, he's been working with students in England, introducing them to music as a profession and giving them live performances with his cello. After a recent school visit, Cohen says he was unsure about how the students had received his presentation. 

Photo by Michael Brosilow / Milwaukee Rep

The world premiere of American Song opens tonight at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater. Starring Wisconsin actor James Devita, it is a searing show about how guns touch one man’s life and change it forever.

Written by Australian playwright Joanna Murray-Smith, the show presents the perspective of a gun violence perpetrator's father - one that often gets overshadowed by the voices of victims and survivors of many mass shootings that have occurred in America.

Darren Hauck / Stringer / Getty Images

The Wisconsin primary is only days away, and the state is in national play. Sarah McCammon is covering the 2016 presidential election for  NPR. This week, she's been in Wisconsin reporting on the GOP race and attended a Ted Cruz event and a Donald Trump rally.

At the "Women for Cruz" event in Madison, McCammon explains that Cruz's wife, Heidi; his mother, Eleanor Cruz; and former presidential candidate Carly Fiorina were all in attendance. 

Tom Davenport

The Milwaukee Ballet's latest show, Kaleidoscope Eyes, features the work of three choreographers. There’s Trey McIntyre’s A Day in The Life, which features music by the Beatles; a new work by Genesis 2015 winner Garret Smith called Addendum, and a world premiere called The Sixth Sin, by Timothy O’Donnell.

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