Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Photo by Stephanie Berger / sistercarrie.com

Theodore Dreiser was one of America’s great novelists in the early part of the 2oth century. His books reflected a changing America as the country and the world became a less rural and more urban place.

Among the themes he explored was the changing role of women, far before the modern feminist movement. Sister Carrie is an early Dreiser novel and follows Carrie from rural Wisconsin to Chicago as she seeks to make a new life.

Tanya Dhein

Milwaukee's InTandem Theatre is known for its love of comedy. And the play opening Thursday falls square in the realm of comedy.

Local playwright Michael Neville wrote Dracula Vs. the Nazis a couple decades ago, and InTandem put it on ten years ago. It’s a two-person, quick-change show that sees each actor take on multiple roles.

Bonnie North

The harp has been around for millennia. There is evidence that people were making and playing some form of the instrument throughout Africa, Europe and Asia from at least as early as 3500 BCE.

The instrument we generally think of as a modern harp, however, is a relatively new addition to the fold - it’s only been around since the late 17th century. The concert harp has a series of pedals that enable the performer to change the pitch of individual strings – allowing them to play all the notes in a western musical scale.

Michael Brosilow

  

When Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color barrier in 1947, it was a huge step forward in the role of African-Americans in professional sports. But big-time, professional sports had a much earlier story of integration in this country.

CPS

Every month, Lake Effect talks with contributor Robert Cohen, the cellist for the Milwaukee-based Fine Arts Quartet, about the life of a working and touring professional musician.

It can be a uniquely challenging occupation. There are a lot of variables that can either help or hurt a musician's performance. And unfortunately when things go wrong, they seem to leave a bigger impression. 

Sergii Mostovyi / Fotolia

All year, Milwaukee singer-songwriter John Sieger has joined us in the studio for a segment called The Monthly Beatdown.

This month, harmonica player Steve Cohen joined Sieger in the studio to play, "The Royal Flush."

Siegar notes that he has a guitar in his powder room, where he's written several songs. This song, despite being written in a bathroom is "not about what you think it is," Sieger jokes. "It's about the card hand, and I'm thinking that possibly I'll be able to sell it to Kenny Rodgers because he did 'The Gambler,' so maybe he'll like this."

Mark Frohna

The Civil Rights era was a defining time in American history, and the reverberations are still being felt today.

A contemporary musical, Violet, explores those early days of the modern civil rights era through the eyes of a young woman – Violet – traveling through 1964 America.

Next Act Theatre / facebook

Winston Churchill once said, “Democracy is the worst form of government, except all those others that have been tried." That sentiment that democracy is beautiful, messy and worth the fight is at the core of Lauren Gunderson’s 2013 play, The Taming.

The play opens Friday at Next Act Theatre, and features an all-woman cast that travels back and forth between present day and the 1787 Continental Congress.

alchemisttheatre.com

David Mamet is one of this country’s great playwrights.  From plays such as American Buffalo to Glengarry Glenross, to Oleanna and Speed the Plow, Mamet’s is a particularly American voice.

MSOrchestra / Facebook

The Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra opened its 2016-2017 season earlier this month with a bravura performance of Mozart’s opera, The Marriage of Figaro. Tuesday night, Itzhak Perlman returned to the MSO as a soloist, and the rest of the season promises equally momentous and musically exciting performances.

Dave Harrison / Flickr

Milwaukee documentarian Chip Duncan has profiled presidents, football coaches and humanitarian crises.  For his latest project, he returns to another subject he's visited in the past – the English author C.S. Lewis, known especially for his Chronicles of Narnia. 

John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Every year, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation honors people throughout the country with a fellowship grant of $625,000, awarded over five years. The so-called "Genius Grant" was given to 23 people this year, who were honored for their originality, insight and potential.

Michael Brosilow

For the past 6 years, The Milwaukee Repertory Theater has kicked off their mainstage season with a large scale musical. With productions ranging in style from Cabaret to The Color Purple to Assassins to Next to Normal, area audiences have come to expect something sweeping and tuneful as the company’s season gets underway.

Library of Congress / Wikimedia

Many of the star constellations we see from the Northern Hemisphere have names that derive from Greek myths and legends.

Astronomer and Greece-native, Jean Creighton, knows both the science and the myths. One such tale is the story of the Corona Borealis constellation, also known as the Northern Crown.

“There was a huge battle between the Minoans and the Athenians, and the Athenians lost. So the king, Minos, said, ‘Okay. As your punishment, you’re going to be sending seven young women and seven young men to Crete to feed the Minotaur,’” says Creighton

Zablocki Veteran's Administration Medical Center

The United States Department of Veteran’s Affairs provides government-run benefits for veterans and their families.

While the VA in its current form has only been around since 1930, the country’s history of providing for disabled veterans goes back to before the U.S. was even a country.

In 1636, the European settlers in the Massachusetts Bay Colony were at war with the Pequot tribe. The colony passed a law then that stated it would support any disabled soldiers from that war. And we have provided for our veterans in some form ever since.

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