Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

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Kathy Wittman / Florentine Opera

This weekend is the final production in this year’s Florentine Opera season. Donizetti’s The Elixir of Love is a frothy, fun romp featuring beautiful singing and a light-hearted plot.

For this production, the opera has been updated to take place in Napa Valley’s wine country.

While some might have dreams of breaking earth-shaking news at a magazine like The New Yorker, Mary Norris’s aspirations were different.

Norris initially wanted to be a writer at the iconic literary news and culture magazine, but her first job there was in the archives. It was from there that she saw her dream job across the office on the copy desk, a place where she has remained ever since.

Norris has been with The New Yorker since 1978, the last 22 years as a query proofreader.

The Waterboys

Whole of the Moon is the song The Waterboys are most famous for in the United States. The UK band had a string of hits in the late 1980s, before the members went their separate ways in the early ‘90s. 

Wolfgang Gauch

We talk every month with cellist Robert Cohen of the Fine Arts Quartet, in a series of conversations called On That Note.

Cohen is recently back from London, and this month, he discusses the physical toll of being a professional touring musician, and whether there is regimen to follow to withstand that toll and still perform at your best:

Lake Effect contributor Robert Cohen is an award-winning recording artist, conductor, artistic director and cellist for the Fine Arts Quartet. 

Jim Bauer, Flickr

New tourism numbers are out for Wisconsin; and for the first time in recorded history, the numbers were up in all 72 counties across the state in 2014.

A total of $11.4 billion in visitor spending was recorded across the state, and tourism was responsible for generating 1.4 billion in state and local taxes.

Marjan Lazarevski / Flickr

Lately, Lake Effect has been talking with astronomy contributor Jean Creighton about how things form in the universe – things such as stars.

This month, the focus is a little closer to home, or maybe a lot closer to home. How do planets, like our own, come to be? Lake Effect astronomy contributor Jean Creighton is the director of the Manfred Olson Planetarium, and she explains that stars come before planets:

WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS

Milwaukee. Kenosha. Wauwatosa. We are surrounded by city names that owe a lot to native languages.

Interest in those languages has increased in the past decade, both from heritage speakers and others. UW-Milwaukee has an American Indian Studies program in the College of Letters and Science. Margaret Noodin is a professor in the English department, and also teaches Ojibwe.

PurpleLorikeet / Flickr

President Obama is now working to try to convince Democrats in Congress to go along with fast track authority on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP.

Supporters of the free trade agreement say it’s a necessary deal in order to open markets for a variety of products, from agricultural to automotive. But opponents say the deal stands to be another blow to American labor, which they say is already in a weakened state, thanks to previous trade agreements such as NAFTA.

B. North

North Korea has a reputation for strict guidelines in all aspects, most especially tourist travel. But a Milwaukee man was invited to the county recently for an athletic event.

Chris Sturdevant competed in the Pyongyang Marathon's 10K race and won a second place medal. Organizers of the race describe it as “the most unprecedented athletic event of the year.”

Sturdevant ran pass some of North Korea's most notable tourist attractions. He stopped by the Lake Effect studio to share his experience.

B. North

Internationally acclaimed violinist Itzhak Perlman has won fifteen Grammy Awards, performed for Presidents and royalty, and for hundreds of thousands of normal people as well.

Tonight, he’ll perform the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Francesco Lecce-Chong at Uhlein Hall.  We had the honor of sitting down with Itzhak Perlman ahead of that performance:

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