Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

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CannonDesign

More new construction is coming to Milwaukee’s near west side. A new athletic research facility will be built on four city blocks bordered by Michigan Street, north 6th Street, 10th street and the Marquette Interchange. The project is a partnership between Marquette University, Aurora Healthcare and the Milwaukee Bucks.

NASA, ESA and G. Bacon / Flickr

It’s always exciting when new scientific discoveries are announced. It’s even exciting to talk about scientific discoveries that aren't yet confirmed. Such is the case for the potential ninth planet that astronomers have been theorizing about based on observations of the solar system.

Next Act Theatre

In 1992, four Los Angeles police officers were acquitted of using excessive force against African American taxi driver Rodney King. The officers had been filmed beating an unarmed King at the end of a high speed chase and the city erupted at the news of their exoneration.

Photo by Ross Zetner / Courtesy of The Bronzeville Arts Ensemble

This week the Bronzeville Arts Ensemble presents its first play. The Mojo and the Sayso opens at the Milwaukee Rep’s Stimke Theatre Thursday night. It will run here through the weekend and then head over to Madison’s Overture Center for the Arts to play there for a couple of weeks.

Photo by Michelle Maternowski / WUWM

This week is full of things to do in Milwaukee and Thursday night is particularly jammed. Outside of the many theater shows and a city birthday party taking place, there is an event for all the animation and film enthusiasts.

Will Clayton / Flickr

Tomorrow night Milwaukee celebrates 170 years as an incorporated city. The Milwaukee Press Club is hosting the city birthday party, Savoring Our City, that kicks off at 5:30 Thursday evening at The Grain Exchange.

The city birthday party looks back at some of the top food products Milwaukee was founded on, such as pork and grains, but also celebrates our culinary scene by recognizing the top chefs and restaurants the city has to offer today.

Skylight Music Theatre

Sex, betrayal, revenge and death are cornerstones of grand opera. Tosca flings herself from the parapets, Madama Butterfly waits in vain for Pinkerton to return and Salome seduces in the dance of the seven veils. The plots of operas are full of the bleaker side of human nature.

Milwaukee Musaik / Milwaukee Musaik

On Monday night, a new music consortium called Milwaukee Musaik will hold its debut concert at Wisconsin Lutheran College’s Schwan Hall. 

The group is led by violinists Alexander Mandl and Jeanyi Kim and clarinetist Bill Helmers. "The Milwaukee Musaik was born out of the Milwaukee Chamber Orchestra, which was the prior organization - which was originally started in 1973 by Steve Colburn and a few other members as the Milwaukee Chamber Music Society," Mandl says.

Favianna Rodriguez

When people and organizations take to the street to protest an event or policy, you often see many homemade signs and banners. However, Milwaukee artist Nicolas Lampert believes that through creating unique and professional signage, a cause can get more attention and validation.

Photo courtesy of Jim Wildeman

For more than half of its life, a century-old mansion on Milwaukee’s east side has been open to the public, first as a library and then as an art museum. But until now, much of the building that houses the Charles Allis Museum’s collection has been off-limits to the public.

Photo by Michael Brosilow / Milwaukee Rep

There are many talents that go into making a successful theater production.  There are actors, the playwright, stage hands, and directing and design teams.  Most directors have a stable of scenic and lighting and costume designers they like to work with. And Milwaukee Rep’s artistic director Mark Clements is no different.

Bonnie North

Today marks the debut of a new monthly music series: The Monthly Beatdown featuring Milwaukee singer-songwriter John Sieger.

Once a month on Lake Effect, Sieger will bring friends and fellow musicians into WUWM's performance studio to play and chat.

This month we hear "Frozen River", a song by Sieger and Milwaukee guitarist Greg Koch. Greg wrote the melody while he was on tour in Europe and sent it to John, who crafted the lyrics. He's joined in the studio by Greg on electric guitar and Greg's son Dylan on percussion.

Jay Matthes / facebook.com

Milwaukee singer-songwriter Jay Matthes has been playing professionally for almost five years. For someone who's still pretty new to the scene, he’s earned a lot of respect. For Matthes, earning the credibility and respect is great for his career, but he keeps his expectations on a music career realistic.

Stoneboat Literary Journal

There are many different ways to write a poem, if you’re so inclined. There’s the sonnet. Or, if you lean towards the bawdy, there’s the limerick. Or if you’re wordy and think of yourself in ancient Greek terms, there’s the two-volume epic.

But for Milwaukee poet Mark Zimmermann, the form that has captured his fancy for the last decade is the lipogram. It’s a form in which the poet chooses to omit certain letters – like writing a poem without the letter B, for example. Zimmermann took it one step further and wrote poems about people that used only the letters in their names.

Rafael Ben-Ari / Fotolia

The Simpsons sang about their fictitious secret society, the Stonecutters, based on the very real group known as the Freemasons.  And it was the Masons that started Americans’ love affair with secret clubs.

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