Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Call it a skills gap – or an employment gap – or even a training gap. The reality is there are thousands of unemployed Milwaukeeans, many of them in the central city. For whatever reason, they’re not connecting with the existing unfilled jobs available.

The presidential election is less than a week away, and foreign policy: America’s place, and role, in the world, will be a key part of the job for whichever administration takes office in January.

Barbara Cook

Barbara Cook is perhaps best known for her Broadway roles: she was the original Marian the Librarian in The Music Man, Cunegonde in Candide, and Amalia in She Loves Me. And her cabaret and concert interpretations of Stephen Sondheim's songs have no peer. But now, nearing the age of 85, the legendary singer and Kennedy Center honoree has taken a far jazzier approach.

Laurence Juber never intended to a rock and roll star. The London-born guitarist, composer, arranger, and session musician had his sights set on a studio career. And he had a very nice one going in London until he got a fateful call from Sir Paul McCartney and ended up joining Sir Paul’s band Wings in 1979. But that wasn’t the first change in musical direction for Juber. He had studied classical guitar as well as music theory at college, but quickly decided the commercial possibilities were limited.

Folk Fusion

Aug 13, 2012
Bruce Molsky

Milwaukee’s Irish Fest returns for its annual run at the Festival Grounds on Thursday. And as is our habit, we’ll feature a few of the bands playing there over the course of the week. While there will be music with an obvious Irish feel, the focus of this year’s festival will also have a distinctly American sound. That’s because many of the acts will spotlight how traditional Irish music evolved into the bluegrass sound we think of as native to Appalachia.

Piano Arts

For the past week, young pianists have gathered in Milwaukee to vie for the title in the 2012 Piano Arts Competition. Since 1999, the biennial competition has launched the careers of numerous national and international performers. And it is one of the few competitions of its kind in the country.

Lake Effect

Peter Roller is an assistant professor of music at Alverno College; Matthew Schroeder is finger-style and rock guitar department chair at the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music. They’ll play a concert tomorrow night at the Conservatory, called A Tribute to Steel-String Guitar Icons.

There is No Dog

Mar 20, 2012

Meg Rosoff is the author of There Is No Dog, published by Penguin. She spoke with Bonnie North.  Rosoff's other novels include the multiple award winning How I Live Now, the film of which is currently in pre-production, and the Carnegie Medal in Literature winner Just in Case. There is more of their conversation about Dog below. Just click on the supplemental audio file.

The Center for Media and Democracy in Madison says the group ALEC has too much secretive influence on legislation. Mary Bottari is the Director of the Madison-based Center for Media and Democracy’s Real Economy Project and BanksterUSA. She has also served as a Senior Analyst in Public Citizen's Global Trade Watch division. She spoke to us from Madison as part of our Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval series. There’s a link to the group’s ALEC Exposed report here.

How has Wisconsin’s business climate fared in 2011? Mark Erhmann is an attorney with Quarles & Brady, LLP in Madison, and the Chairman of the Board of Forward Wisconsin, a non-profit organization created in 1984 to foster economic development in Wisconsin.

This past year saw a major reorganization for the Wisconsin Arts Board – which lost its agency level status and was absorbed within the state’s Department of Tourism. George Tzugros is the Executive Director of the Wisconsin Arts Board. Tzugros spoke with Bonnie North as part of our Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval series.

Education dominates the first part of our news roundup this week, starting with a report that MPS students have again scored lower that most of the rest of the country on standardized math and reading tests. Then, most of Wisconsin’s teachers unions voted to re-certify, despite the now annual requirement that they do so. There was also news of the large racial disparity in traffic stops by Milwaukee Police. Lake Effect Weekend’s regular news analyst and Milwaukee Magazine editor Bruce Murphy joins us now to put it all into perspective.

Time may not seem all that controversial, but to scientists it’s a debatable topic. Adam Frank is a professor of Astrophysics at the University of Rochester in New York and a regular contributor to Discover and Astronomy magazines. He's also the co-founder of the 13:7 Cosmos and Culture blog on NPR.

A Wisconsin master of glass work discusses the medium’s artistic appeal. Beth Lipman is an internationally renowned glass artist based in Sheboygan Falls, Wis. She spoke with Bonnie North. Lipman will be leading a Glass + Kiln Weekend Workshop this Saturday and Sunday at the John Michael Kohler Center in Sheboygan.

Our Project Milwaukee: Southern Connections series asks whether cities the size of Racine or Kenosha can support a distinct arts community, or if regional approaches to culture is the way to go. Bruce Pepich is the Executive Director and Curator of Collections at the Racine Art Museum. He was recently awarded the Wisconsin Visual Art Lifetime Achievement Award for his 37 years at the museum. He spoke with Bonnie North.

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