Bruce Campbell

Surgeon, Blogger, Advisory Board Member

Dr. Bruce Campbell is a Head and Neck Cancer Surgeon at the Medical College of Wisconsin, holding faculty appointments in the Department of Otolaryngology and the Institute for Health and Society (Bioethics and Medical Humanities). His research interests include cancer survivorship and the integration of the humanities into medical education.

Dr. Campbell contributes medically-related essays to WUWM's Lake Effect program and blogs at Reflections in a Head Mirror. He learns something new every day from his patients and his students. Bruce and his wife, Kathi, live in Brookfield and are the proud parents of four adult children.

Bruce joined WUWM’s Advisory Board in 2013.

Twitter: @headmirror

Essay: Alarm Bells

Jun 30, 2015
Vic / Flickr

Patients often judge their doctors on their bedside manner.  But doctors also pay attention to how well they get along with their patients. But as Lake Effect essayist Dr. Bruce Campbell explains, it’s for reasons patients might not realize:

He is the happiest person in my medical practice, and every visit is full of his non-stop banter.  As soon as I walk in the room, he is off  and running.

Essay: The Tattoo

Apr 9, 2015
Jhong Dizon / Flickr

EKG machines and other high-tech medical equipment are common in hospitals across the country. But as accurate and sensitive as they are, they can’t always answer the questions a doctor might have:

The images were dramatic. The young man was in his early 20s, and his shoulders, chest, and upper arms were covered with a swirling image of skulls, barbed wire, spider webs, and violent messages. The tattoos were, no doubt, meant to send a message to anyone who saw them. The images disappeared underneath the hospital gown that had been draped over him.

Photos.com

Automated telephone answering systems were supposed to help firms conduct their business more efficiently and to help those calling for information get to the right person faster.

Photos.com

No matter how much learning we do, there's still going to be information we don't know. Essayist Dr. Bruce Campbell can relate, as he goes about teaching the surgeons of the future:

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In the years before I went to medical school, I worked as a nurse’s aide. Early one morning, one of the surgeons dropped by the Emergency Room in a particularly good mood. The ER doctor asked him why he was so happy.