Catalina Maria Johnson

Some events in Adan Jodorowsky's life seem almost too fantastic to be true. But indeed, the son of renowned Chilean avant-garde icon Alejandro Jodorowsky was taught to play the guitar by George Harrison. As a 7 year old, he learned a few dance steps from James Brown himself.

Despite leading such a charmed life, Jodorowsky says that he felt the need to share his earlier musical creations with the world as"Adanowsky." But he's ready to finally leave that musical persona behind.

The Jewish-Latin musical connection has been explored by musicians in a variety of fascinating ways — in the '50s by the so-called mamboniks, or in the early 2000s by Hip Hop Hoodios, for example.

Brooklyn-based composer and vocalist Xenia Rubinos has been an Alt.Latino favorite since her magical debut album in 2013.

There is possibly no other single musician who has defined the state of Latin Jazz more than Eddie Palmieri, who turns 81 years old today.

The village of El Clavo lies just an hour bus-ride from the Venezuelan capital of Caracas, practically hidden in the lushness of the jungle. Centuries ago, the settlement was founded by rebel Africans who set up secret free communities deep in the brush of the region.

Several years ago, Julián Salazar — at the time guitar player for internationally-renowned band Bomba Estereo — spent some time on the Pacific coast of Columbia, an experience that motivated him to capture the lush, entrancing sonic landscapes of the jungle in his compositions.

About eight years ago, in a small club in Copenhagen, a then-unknown band named Bomba Estéreo grabbed us by the musical jugular. Singer Liliana Saumet strode across the stage as the group wrapped her incendiary vocals in a startlingly fresh mix of Colombian roots, propelled by a punk-psychedelic sensibility.

These days, Bomba Estéreo occupies a privileged space in the Latinx musical universe — it composed one of the most iconic anthems of Latinx identity, "Soy Yo." (Its video now has over 23 million views.)

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