Colin Dwyer

A looming decision about whether to abolish or shrink the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah should provide an early signal of how the Trump administration will deal with a long list of public lands issues.

The pirate north of the border has conceded defeat.

After five years of buying Trader Joe's products in the U.S. and selling them at a high markup in Vancouver — and fighting a protracted legal battle to keep doing so — the man behind Pirate Joe's has finally shuttered the secondhand store.

You might be wondering about the guy wearing a bucket on his head.

After more than two weeks of bloodshed, brutality and the creeping danger of starvation, Marawi remains a city under siege. Philippine authorities are reckoning with a mounting death toll — which by many media counts is more than 170 people — as well as the looming threat that the siege might become a bloody stalemate.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

The death toll from Saturday's terrorist attack in London has risen to eight, the city's Metropolitan Police said Wednesday. The announcement comes shortly after authorities recovered a body from the Thames River in east London.

The U.N. Security Council expanded its sanctions against North Korea on Friday, penalizing the country for its repeated missile tests this year. The resolution, which was unanimously approved by the 15-country council, adds 14 people and four entities to a blacklist that brings with it a travel ban and asset freeze.

Hayao Miyazaki's many fans worldwide just got an unexpected gift.

Studio Ghibli, the animation firm co-founded by the beloved anime director, plans to build a theme park dedicated to one of his most famous creations: My Neighbor Totoro. Hideaki Omura — governor of Japan's Aichi Prefecture, where the park is scheduled to open in 2020 — announced the plan at a news conference Thursday.

Just two days after a car bomb tore through Kabul, killing at least 90 people and injuring hundreds more, demonstrators took to the streets of the Afghan capital in droves to demand the resignation of top officials. But even as the demonstrations called for better security from extremist violence, further violence arose Friday as security forces opened fire on the protesters.

More than a week after ISIS-linked militants seized Marawi, the Philippine military suffered a significant blow in its bid to retake the southern city: The country's defense secretary, Delfin Lorenzana, announced Thursday that an errant airstrike killed at least 10 of the military's own soldiers and injured seven others.

Brazil's massive, yearslong corruption investigation has reached a historic mile-marker: J&F Investimentos, the holding company behind meatpacking giant JBS SA, agreed to pay roughly $3.2 billion in fines for its involvement in a vast graft scandal that has reached even President Michel Temer.

The state of Ohio has sued five major drug manufacturers for their role in the opioid epidemic. In the lawsuit filed Wednesday, state Attorney General Mike DeWine alleges these five companies "helped unleash a health care crisis that has had far-reaching financial, social, and deadly consequences in the State of Ohio."

Named in the suit are:

  • Purdue Pharma
  • Endo Health Solutions
  • Teva Pharmaceutical Industries and subsidiary Cephalon
  • Johnson & Johnson and subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals

It has been more than 60 days since Venezuela's Supreme Court moved to dissolve the country's National Assembly. The move, intended to eliminate a thorn in the side of embattled President Nicolas Maduro, was reversed after three days — but the political fallout has barreled into its third month, roiling city streets across the country.

For a few hours Monday, the bitter face-off between a bull and a girl in New York City got a curious, four-legged interloper: a tiny pug, with one of those legs suggestively raised beside the girl's leg. There was no urine, no caustic caption, but it was clear where the dog's disdain was directed.

Timothy Loehmann, the police officer who shot and killed 12-year-old Tamir Rice in 2014, was fired by the Cleveland Police Department on Tuesday. At a news conference, city authorities announced that the reason for his termination wasn't the deadly incident that brought him to national attention, but rather violations he committed in the course of his hiring process.

By the end of the state legislative session in Texas on Monday, the Capitol had devolved into scuffles and grave accusations. A Democratic lawmaker had accused his GOP colleague of threatening to "put a bullet" in another lawmaker's head. That GOP state representative, meanwhile, accused a counterpart of threatening his life, saying he was prepared to use his gun in self-defense.

To understand how the day ended this way, one must first rewind to its start.

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