Colin Dwyer

Updated at 10:34 a.m. ET Friday with Amazon's statement

The European Commission announced Thursday that it is concluding its antitrust investigation of Amazon over e-books, citing key changes to the contracts that inspired the probe in the first place.

The executive arm of the European Union had been wary of clauses that required publishers to alert Amazon about terms offered by the company's competitors — clauses that Amazon has now promised to modify.

North Korea doesn't have a whole lot of longtime friends on the world stage. In fact, as Pyongyang looks beyond its borders, it is likely to find only one world power ready to regularly defend its interests and actions in high-level international negotiations: China, its next-door neighbor, most important trading partner and staunch ally.

Puerto Rico has asked for a form of bankruptcy protection to help it grapple with more than $70 billion in public-sector debt. The unprecedented maneuver, requested by the governor and filed shortly afterward by a federal oversight board, sets in motion what would likely be the largest municipal debt restructuring in U.S. history.

There's a decent chance you — or someone you know — just got an odd email inviting you to edit a document in Google Docs. The email could be from a stranger, a colleague or a friend, but it's addressed to a contact that boasts a whole string of H's in its name.

In other words, it looks a little something like this:

Or, if you're looking at the invite in Gmail, it likely looks more like this:

Either of these look familiar to you? Here's a handy tip: Don't open the link.

Faced with a recent spate of violent videos and hate speech posted by users on its network, Facebook has announced plans for a heap of hires: 3,000 new employees worldwide to review and react to reports of harm and harassment.

"Over the last few weeks, we've seen people hurting themselves and others on Facebook — either live or in video posted later. It's heartbreaking, and I've been reflecting on how we can do better for our community," CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced Wednesday in a Facebook post.

Just half-a-year after a federal judge tossed out three lawsuits against Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who grabbed headlines in 2015 for denying marriage licenses to same-sex couples on religious grounds, a court of appeals ruled Tuesday that the men suing Davis can continue their case.

When Matthew Bryce paddled out into the cold surf off the west coast of Scotland, he was clad in a thick, neoprene wetsuit — gear that would stand him in good stead for a solid surf session Sunday. But at less than an inch thick, that material may not have seemed the most important bit of equipment the 22-year-old surfer brought with him.

Protesters thronged outside a Seoul courtroom Tuesday, marking the start to Park Geun-hye's corruption trial with demonstrations both for and against the ousted South Korean president. In fact, the scene was so packed, one absence stood out all the more starkly: that of Park herself.

Authorities in South Sudan detained Eyder Peralta, NPR's correspondent in East Africa, for roughly four days before releasing him Monday morning. Peralta and his South Sudanese assistant were first placed in custody in the city of Juba on Friday, and they were held for three nights.

It remains unclear why they were detained.

Peralta flew home unharmed to his base in Nairobi, Kenya, on Monday morning. His assistant is still in custody, however, and NPR spokeswoman Isabel Lara says the organization is now "in touch with authorities regarding his release."

The city of San Francisco has settled with Airbnb and HomeAway, concluding a lawsuit brought by the two short-term home rental companies by agreeing to new registration procedures for prospective hosts. The case, which had been heard in federal court, hinged on how the companies comply with a recently instituted city law.

During his weekly televised address Sunday, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro announced that he was ordering a countrywide minimum wage hike. Beginning Monday, Venezuelans on the lowest rung of the economic ladder can expect a 60 percent boost to their monthly wages.

Halfway into a 24-hour worker strike, Brazil's biggest cities have partially shut down — with many major thoroughfares clogged and businesses shuttered for the day. The nationwide strike mounted by unions aims to unravel a set of measures supported by President Michel Temer, legislation that would loosen labor laws and roll back pension regulations.

NPR's Philip Reeves reports, "As darkness fell, clashes broke out between protestors and riot police in Rio de Janeiro and also Sao Paulo, where a crowd tried to march on Temer's residence."

President Trump has ordered the Department of the Interior to review all designations of national monuments greater than 100,000 acres created since 1996.

West Virginia State University announced Wednesday that it is suing Dow Chemical Co. for allegedly contaminating the groundwater beneath its campus. The school has accused the multinational chemical manufacturer of introducing three hazardous chemicals into the water in the community of Institute, near the city of Charleston.

Updated 2 a.m. Thursday ET:

Pages