David Greene

David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

Greene's voice became familiar to NPR listeners from his four years covering the White House. To report on former President George W. Bush's second term, Greene spent hours in NPR's spacious booth in the basement of the West Wing (it's about the size of your average broom closet). He also spent time trekking across five continents, reporting on White House visits to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Rwanda, Uruguay – and, of course, Crawford, Texas.

During the days following Hurricane Katrina, Greene was aboard Air Force One when President Bush flew low over the Gulf Coast and caught his first glimpse of the storm's destruction. On the ground in New Orleans, Greene brought listeners a moving interview with the late Ethel Williams, a then-74-year-old flood victim who got an unexpected visit from the president.

Greene was an integral part of NPR's coverage of the historic 2008 election, covering Hillary Clinton's campaign from start to finish, and also focusing on how racial attitudes were playing into voters' decisions. The White House Correspondents Association took special note of Greene's report on a speech by then-candidate Barack Obama, addressing the nation's racial divide. Greene was given the association's 2008 Merriman Smith award for deadline coverage of the presidency.

After President Obama took office, Greene kept one eye trained on the White House and the other eye on the road. He spent three months driving across America – with a recorder, camera and lots of caffeine – to learn how the recession was touching Americans during President Obama's first 100 days in office. The series was called "100 Days: On the Road in Troubled Times."

Before joining NPR in 2005, Greene spent nearly seven years as a newspaper reporter for the Baltimore Sun. He covered the White House during the Bush administration's first term, and wrote about an array of other topics for the paper: Why Oklahomans love the sport of cockfighting, why two Amish men in Pennsylvania were caught trafficking methamphetamine and how one woman brought Christmas back to a small town in Maryland.

Before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in government, Greene worked as the senior editor on the Harvard Crimson. In 2004, he was named co-volunteer of the year for Coaching for College, a Washington, D.C., program offering tutoring to inner-city youth.

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Asia
3:21 am
Fri August 23, 2013

China's Big Political Trial Takes A Dramatic Turn

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 6:25 am

Chinese politician Bo Xilai is in court for a second day — accused of corruption and involvement in an attempted cover-up of his wife's murder of a British businessman. The trial opened on Thursday, and Bo put up a fierce defense. But on the second day, it appears he has been silenced.

Research News
3:21 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Can Your Car Make You An Unethical Driver?

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 6:25 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When there's room to spread out, we often take advantage of it. Think about a big car or an SUV. You're behind the wheel, you roll the window down. You might prop up your left elbow. The other arm is outstretched on the wheel. It all sounds nice and relaxing, but it could have some major consequences. There's new research suggesting that you are more likely to blow a stop sign or a red light and not even know it. NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam is here to explain this.

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Middle East
4:23 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Symbolic Developments Indicate Direction Egypt Is Headed

Egypt's military-backed rulers are pressing on in their crackdown against the Muslim Brotherhood. Authorities have arrested the group's spiritual leader. Since the security forces crackdown on Islamist protesters last week, nearly 1,000 people have been killed.

NPR Story
3:38 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Democrats And Republicans Push Obama To Get Tough With Egypt

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

After a weeklong vacation, President Obama is back at the White House, though not for long. He's getting ready for a bus tour later in the week to promote his policies on the economy and education. The president is also dealing with demands from both political parties that he get tougher with the Egyptian military, as violence rages in Egypt.

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Middle East
5:02 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Egypt's Army To Use Live Ammunition To Keep Order

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:30 am

Egypt's Interior Ministry has authorized the use of deadly force against protesters targeting police and state institutions. The death toll has surpassed 600 since Wednesday and spread outside the bloody crackdown in Cairo against supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

Asia
4:36 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Rescuers In India Try To Reach Sailors Trapped In Submarine

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 8:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In India, rescuers are trying to reach 18 sailors feared trapped in a submarine that caught fire after a massive explosion in Mumbai last night. The defense ministry said at least some of those on board have been killed. This smoldering sub is in its berth at a highly secured naval base, with only a portion visible above the surface.

This incident comes as a setback for India, just as the country is trying to beef up its military. And for more, we're joined by NPR's Julie McCarthy from New Delhi. Julie, good morning.

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Middle East
4:36 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Security Forces Move In On Egyptian Protests

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 8:16 am

After days of tense standoff in Cairo, Egyptian security forces began clearing two sit-in camps by supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. The Interior Ministry, which is in charge of police, warned in a statement that the forces would deal firmly with protesters acting "irresponsibly."

Middle East
4:19 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Ahead Of Peace Talks, Israel Expands Settlements

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 7:21 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

Secretary of State John Kerry has invested time, effort and American prestige into finding a solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He is restarting a peace process that has been stalled for years. Direct talks between the parties are set to resume on Wednesday, in Jerusalem.

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Technology
4:37 am
Wed July 31, 2013

An Inside Look At The Hacker Conferences

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Thousands of computer hackers are in Las Vegas right now for two major hacker conventions this week. One is called DEF CON, and the other's called Black Hat. Now, lest you just think these are just gatherings of computer geeks trying to break into your bank account or tap into your text messages, there is a lot more to these events. We called NPR's Steve Henn, who's in Las Vegas, checking out what's going on. Steve, good morning.

STEVE HENN, BYLINE: Good morning.

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Business
4:27 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Ex-Goldman Sachs Executive Takes The Stand

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 6:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A former executive at Goldman Sachs will take the stand again in his civil fraud trial this morning. Fabrice Tourre is accused of misleading investors about a security he marketed and sold in the months leading up to the subprime mortgage collapse.

Tourre began testifying yesterday afternoon, and NPR's Jim Zarroli was there. Jim, good morning.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: Good morning.

GREENE: So give us the background, here, if you can. What is Fabrice Tourre accused of, exactly?

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