Elise Hu

Elise Hu is a reporter who covers the intersection of technology and culture for NPR's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

She joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters who helped launch The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu is an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

Follow her on Twitter @elisewho.

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All Tech Considered
6:40 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Tech Week: Smartphones And You, Virtual Reality, NPR Plays

The Oculus Rift virtual reality headset is now part of Facebook's empire.
Jeff Chiu AP

The tech news cycle didn't stop churning this week, with the fairy tale story of the Kickstarter-backed Oculus VR getting purchased by Facebook for $2 billion, the flop of a Candy Crush IPO and Turkey banning YouTube after already

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All Tech Considered
10:07 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Pay Attention: Your Frustration Over Smartphone Distraction

Our conversation about smartphone addiction continues.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 1:55 pm

Smartphones are so prevalent in our lives that they're interrupting everything from meals to movies. And engaging with them is sometimes taking precedence over enjoying the real, live human beings seated next to us.

So what should be the norms around smartphone use? Is it completely situational — OK for some places or times, but not others? How does the ubiquity of smartphones affect interpersonal contact?

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All Tech Considered
9:08 am
Wed March 26, 2014

How A Cold Brew Can Stop You From Checking Your Smartphone

A beer glass that only stands if it can rest on your smartphone.
Fischer & Friends Agency

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:29 am

Regular All Tech readers may know that we've been exploring the social norms around obsessively checking your smartphone while out with real, live human beings. Is it a big no-no, or a new normal? Is it totally not cool in a movie but OK to peek at dinner?

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All Tech Considered
2:23 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Smartphones And Mealtime: Turn Device-Avoidance Into A Game

One way to avoid checking your phone at mealtime? Stack 'em up in the middle of the table.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 3:16 pm

We are having a running conversation about what's acceptable and what isn't when it comes to checking our smartphones during various situations. My original question had to do with mealtime, in which previously it was considered rude to check your phone during dinner. It appears attitudes are changing around that, but some of you, like me, still prize those quiet moments of reflection without a device to turn to.

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All Tech Considered
11:17 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Starting Today, Find NPR Shows And Newscasts On iTunes Radio

iTunes Radio

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 12:22 pm

You'll have one more place to find public radio content starting Monday: Anywhere you can play iTunes, you'll find NPR.

Digital streams of Morning Edition, All Things Considered and hourly newscasts will be available on a new 24-hour streaming NPR station on iTunes Radio.

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