Ellen Kozak

Copyright and Media Lawyer

Ellen M. Kozak is a Milwaukee copyright, publishing and media lawyer. She is also the author of several pseudonymous novels, hundreds of articles in such publications as Travel+Leisure, USA Today and the Wall Street Journal, and three nonfiction books: From Pen to Print: The Secrets of Getting Published Successfully, Every Writer’s Guide to Copyright and Publishing Law and The Everything U.S. Constitution Book. She is graduate of Barnard College and the University of Wisconsin Law School.

Arts & Culture
2:36 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Essay: Celebrating the United States Constitution, or America 2.0

The United States Constitution
Credit flickr, Jonathan Thorne

[Originally aired September 2012]

225 years ago, on September 17, 1787, the delegates to the Constitutional Convention signed their names to the final draft of the United States Constitution.  Less than a year later, on June 21, 1788, when New Hampshire became the 9th state to ratify it, it became, as it states in its own Article VI, the supreme law of the land. 

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Arts & Culture
2:17 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Essay: The Zen on a City Bus

A ride on the city bus is something everyone should experience.
Credit flickr, Milwaukee County Transit

Although I take public transportation all the time when I’m in New York, I hadn't been on a Milwaukee bus since I got my driver's license at 16.  But half a century later, I’m old enough to get a discounted fare again, so when work took me downtown on a regular basis last winter, I decided to bury my old prejudices and take the bus. 

That was when I discovered the zen of riding the bus. 

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Arts & Culture
1:55 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Essay: Prohibition's Impact on Milwaukee

Garters helped hide this vice during the dry spell.
Credit Wikimedia commons

When you ask most people what they think of when they hear the word Prohibition, they will probably tell you “speakeasies and gangsters.”  Prohibition is a perfect example of the law of unintended consequences-- a law meant to curb drinking that encouraged it. The widespread flouting of this law made criminals of people who would never have dreamt of breaking the law before it was passed. 

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Arts & Culture
1:18 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Essay: Anniversary of the 19th Amendment

Feminist Suffrage Parade in New York City, 1912
Credit Wikimedia commons

[originally aired in August 2011]

Picture this. You are a woman lawyer clerking for a federal judge, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in the United States of America. It is September of 1970, with revolution in the air, a time of long hair on men and short skirts on women.  You join a group of fifteen or so of your male law school classmates (women had constituted less than 3% of the class) for lunch in the restaurant at the top of the Marine Bank (now the Chase Tower).  

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Arts & Culture
11:44 am
Fri December 21, 2012

A Cheat Sheet for Watching the Movie "Lincoln"

The movie "Lincoln" has been nominated for 7 Golden Globes, but does it balance historical accuracy with its artistic vision?

Many people are looking back at the Civil War era, and not just because of the sesquicentennial – but because of one Steven Spielberg. The Hollywood icon’s latest film is “Lincoln,” which was just nominated for seven Golden Globe Awards. The film depicts the President’s efforts to get the 13th Amendment – ending slavery – through a contentious Congress. But, like all movies, it takes some artistic license at the expense of historical accuracy.

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