Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for The Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

She just moved to Milwaukee’s East Side, where she lives with her cats Misses and Marvin. Joy spends much of her free time drawing, painting and practicing the mandolin.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

Joseph Ellwanger

For clergyman Joseph Ellwanger, the battle to end racial injustices across the U.S. involved overseeing the desegregation of the pews of his church.

Ellwanger is pastor emeritus of the Cross Lutheran Church in Milwaukee. During his stewardship, from 1967 to 2001, Cross Lutheran evolved from a predominately white congregation to an integrated one.

Voces de la Frontera / Flickr

There's a common misconception that many, or most, Latinos in Milwaukee are actually immigrants; however, Hispanic people have been living in the area since the 1920s.

There were relatively few Latinos in our community for decades. "The big numbers start in the late '70s and '80s and '90s is really when the large influx of Latinos come to Milwaukee," says Enrique Figueroa, the former longtime director of the Roberto Hernandez Center and an associate professor at UW-Milwaukee.

UWM Libraries American Geographical Society Library

“Segregation is not an accident,” according to Reggie Jackson, the head griot for American’s Black Holocaust Museum.

“There’s this idea that people self-segregate, but the reality is that there’s never really been self-segregation in Milwaukee,” Jackson says. “The segregation that we have, in terms of people of color, was created by a variety of different in institutions and individuals.”

Chris Arnade

During the early to mid-1900s, the Great Migration brought millions of African-Americans from rural, southern towns to cities like Chicago, Detroit, and of course, Milwaukee.

To this day, many older, black Milwaukeeans have roots in the South. Many moved here as teens and young adults, looking for work in an industrial city that overflowed with jobs at the time.

In 2014, Time magazine faced public outcry for including the word feminist in its Worst Words Poll, which asked readers what word they felt should be banned in 2015. The magazine apologized for the “execution” of the poll, but the controversy speaks to the many, mixed emotions that the word often elicits.

Courtesy of Dr. Fran Kaplan, Coordinator, America’s Black Holocaust Virtual Museum

Lynchings of African-Americans were not uncommon in the United States, well into the last century. But like much of the history of racial tensions in America, the common notion is that these extrajudicial murders just happened south of the Mason-Dixon. 

Jabril Faraj

Around dusk on a Thursday night in early August, a group of about 30 black men parade down the 4300 block of N. 25th Street in Garden Homes.

Mitch Teich

Heather Terhune knows a lot about ice. The executive chef at Tre Rivali has a lot of opinions about the ice used at the restaurant, a fact she let slip at the first MilMag Live! event on the influence of insiders and outsiders in Milwaukee. 

Ingrid Taylar / Flickr

Foreign policy and trade agreements have taken center stage in the Trump administration, but it remains unclear how the President’s rhetoric will translate to action.

In one of his first executive orders after the inauguration, Donald Trump withdrew the United States from negotiations over the TPP - also known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The proposed trade agreement was used by both Democrats and Republicans during the campaign, as a proxy for the pitfalls of globalization.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

The Trump Administration appointed former Georgia governor Sonny Perdue as the next Secretary of Agriculture, but for some in the agriculture business the announcement came too late.

The appointment was announced long after every other cabinet member had already been announced, a perceived slight to a community that had overwhelmingly supported Donald Trump during the election. 

Jabril Faraj

Zahra Omar describes her aunt as a strong woman. But when she resisted armed Somali militants who had entered her home, they tied her up before one of the men shot and killed her.

“My daddy, too — he died like that,” said Omar, 25. “I’ve never seen my dad.”

vetre / Fotolia

Until recently, scientists didn't understand just how critical adolescence is for human development. And over the next decade, we will likely learn more than ever before about how young minds develop.

That’s because work is starting on a groundbreaking study of the subject. It's called the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development, or ABCD, Study, and nearly two dozen institutions across the U.S. will be participating in the research.

National Atlas of the United States / Department of Interior

Politically, Wisconsin has long been considered a “purple state.” Not Democratic or Republican; a swing state. But all that changed after the 2010 election, when Wisconsin voted a Republican majority into the state assembly. What happened next changed the course of state politics and undermined the very concept of democracy through what was considered a relatively benign practice - gerrymandering.

tibor13 / Fotolia

Call it what you will: sizzurp, purple drank or lean. They’re all the same. The cough syrup mixture has been a popular drug in some circles for decades, and it’s making a resurgence here in Milwaukee.

The substance is the subject of an article in this month's Milwaukee Magazine, written by freelancer Eben Pindyck. 

Junius Brutus Stearns - / Wikimedia

Since the current U.S. Constitution was created in 1787, the basic framework of the document has remain largely unchanged. But that could change.

A group of corporations and conservative legislators - known as ALEC, or the American Legislative Exchange Council - is pushing for an Article V Convention. The move, also known as a constitutional convention, could end in amending or completely changing the U.S. constitution.

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