Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for The Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

She just moved to Milwaukee’s East Side, where she lives with her cats Misses and Marvin. Joy spends much of her free time drawing, painting and practicing the mandolin.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

Francesco Sgroi / Flickr

On June 23, citizens of the United Kingdom will cast ballots in a referendum to determine whether or not they’ll remain in the European Union. It’s a tense time, with passions running high on both sides of the issue. 

It's a complex issue with roots in Britain's historical reluctance to ally itself with mainland Europe, despite their continued reliance on trade with other countries in the EU. Still, Lake Effect foreign policy contributor Art Cyr, says that leaving the EU could be a decidedly bad business move for the UK. 

Courtesy of Alfred A. Knopf.

Family, survival and small town values are all on display in Peter Geye’s latest novel, Wintering.

Trapper Schoepp

Musician Christopher the Conquered, also known as Christopher Ford, is giving up on rock & roll. Well, kind of. 

pressmaster / Fotolia

Milwaukee-based HR consulting firm ManpowerGroup recently released a study called, “Millennial Careers: 2020 Vision.” The report analyzes what millennial workers want from employers, how they differ from previous generations and the kinds of traits employers should be looking for from these employees.

Robert Altman

This Friday, Present Music will hold its Season Finale and Party at Turner Hall Ballroom. The group is finishing its 34th season playing new music in Milwaukee, and will feature guest conductor David Bloom, a founding co-artistic director of Contemporaneous in New York.

Jason Merritt / Getty Images

Comedian Lisa Lampanelli is known as the "Queen of Mean,” but if you think that’s all she is, then you’re in for a big surprise.

No one is safe when this insult comic hits the stage, but when the lights go down and she's back to normal life, Lampanelli says it makes her "cringe" when she hears someone use a racial slur.  

"Offstage is a whole different story. You know, I'm very careful with language and things like that just because in my gut, I'm a different person than I am on stage," she says. 

Sophia Boyd / Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

All Lismari Montes, 15, had to do was find the bottle of prescribed sleeping pills that were hidden in her parent’s room. “I’m done” was all she could think as she walked upstairs to her room, yearning for escape from her exhausting fight with depression.

Anger drove her to this point. She was angry at her family and herself. “I like to think of it as a snowball,” she said. “It went from this little tiny issue … to the point where I didn’t think [it] was worth living.”

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The term millennial is thrown around so frequently that many may not know who is and isn't a millennial. It's used pretty generally to mean a young person, and it doesn't really have a strict definition, which has been confusing for some. 

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It’s graduation season, which also means it’s the season of commencement speeches. A time when celebrities take the stage, armed with jokes and wisdom for millions of young people entering the workforce.

Lynne Bergschultz

Author Cari Taylor-Carlson really knows the meaning of “faking it till’ you make it.” The former suburban housewife turned wilderness guide, spent a lot of time smiling through the fear as she started her outdoor touring business, Venture West.

Mattie Hagedorn / Flickr

If you’re trying to eat healthier, you might find yourself switching out butter for olive oil. Many believe that plant-based fats, rich in linoelic acid, are healthier than saturated fats like lard or butter. Saturated fats raise your cholesterol, and that supposedly raises your risk of dying from a heart attack. 

The Memory Palace

Host Nate Dimeo is bringing his popular history podcast, The Memory Palace, to life on stage at the Colectivo

Henry Holt Books for Young Readers

Most of us live our lives based on some assumptions. We think we know where we came from, and we believe that says something about who we are. But what happens when you find your life is based on a lie? What do you do, and who do you become?

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There are currently thousands of police officers working in U.S. schools, but there are almost no state or federal laws that require them to undergo special training to work with students.

Police officers are increasingly being used to discipline students in the classroom, and infractions that once sent kids to the principal's office are now landing them in handcuffs. 

J.H. Fearless / Flickr

It's growing season, and eager gardeners are already starting their plants for the summer. The promise of fresh fruits and vegetables is what keeps people coming back to their garden plots. But gardening is messy business, and setting up your garden can be strenuous. For many, the worst part is preparing the soil. It's a painstaking process of digging and tilling, which can feel arduous and unrewarding. 

Gardening contributor, Melinda Myers, knows this all too well. That's why she suggests something called, "lasagna gardening." 

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