Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for The Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

She just moved to Milwaukee’s East Side, where she lives with her cats Misses and Marvin. Joy spends much of her free time drawing, painting and practicing the mandolin.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

Day Donaldson / Flickr

News of the so-called "super lice" invasion has sent many parents into panic mode. It seems like schools around Wisconsin are “lousy” with the little guys, and are seemingly immune to traditional forms of lice removal.

But local pediatrician Dr. Michael O’Reilly believes the term super lice is a bit hyperbolic.

Mark Frohna / Skylight Music Theatre

What is a crown? To some, it’s a symbol of royalty. To others a crown is a hat, but not just any hat. Skylight Music Theater’s production of Crowns: A Gospel Musical is about the African American tradition of wearing flamboyant and ornate hats to church.

Perry-Castañeda Library / Wikimedia

If you've watched Saturday Night Live's "Fond du Lac Action News" newscast, you might have heard a semi-familiar accent. And while parts of the dialect were pretty spot-on, other parts were just off.

Marquette linguistics professor, Steve Hartman Keiser, says that could be due to a fundamental misunderstanding of Wisconsin’s location.

Arthur Szyk / The Arthur Szyk Society

Political cartoons have a rich and often influential history in this country. The 20th century illuminator Arthur Szyk was known as both a caricaturist and provocateur – his work was used in the US propaganda machine during World War II.

But he’s also known for his work in Jewish motifs, and that’s a key reason for the exhibit currently on at Jewish Museum Milwaukee, called Arthur Szyk: The Art of Illumination.

Neal Easterling

While a 14th Century book by a sickly English mystic might not seem a likely source of inspiration, composer Carson Cooman might beg to differ. His piece, The Revelations of Divine Love (Metaphors from Sea and Sky), was inspired by St. Julian of Norwich’s book of the same name, and will make its Midwest premiere this Sunday with the Bel Canto Chorus at St. Dominic Catholic Parish.

Pedro Szekely / Flickr

After three years of negotiating, Colombia’s government is set to sign a peace agreement with the FARC rebels later this month. The treaty could put an end to the armed conflict in the country, which has been going on for more than 50 years.

As of 2000, Colombia was in danger of becoming a narco-state, a country controlled by drug lords.

Tom Margie / Flickr

The late Yip Harburg wrote the words to more than 600 songs in his life, but the one he’s probably known for more than all the rest is the iconic Over the Rainbow, from The Wizard of Oz, for which he won an Academy Award.

Ed Bierman / Flickr

Marquette University just launched the Josiah A. Powless Scholarship - a fund that will help Native American students and other underrepresented minorities afford tuition at the prestigious university.

But according to Marquette Provost, Dr. Daniel Meyers, the fund is also symbolic of Marquette’s dedication to creating a more welcoming campus.

Snowmaker55 / Instagram

And the Academy Award goes to: Jim Hourihan, Alan Trombla, and Seth Rosenthal.

If none of those names seem familiar, there could be a good reason for that. Although all three are 2016 Academy Award winners, they weren’t part of the televised broadcast.

In fact, they were given their awards in an entirely different ceremony dedicated to technical and scientific achievements in the motion picture industry. It’s called the Sci-Tech awards, also known as the “Nerd Oscars.”

Paul Ruffolo

Where do you go when you’re trying to escape your troubles? Well, Costa Rica, of course - at least that’s true of the main characters in Slowgirl.

The play opened this week at the Milwaukee Chamber Theatre.

Michael Dorausch / Flickr

A Marquette University researcher hopes his work could be a promising step towards a cure for spinal cord injuries and the paralysis they cause.

Dr. Murray Blackmore turned to an unlikely ally in his work - cancer genes.

The Marian Center for Nonprofits

After 25 years in operation, the Marian Center for Nonprofits, known for providing affordable workspaces to area nonprofits, will be closing its doors July 1, 2016.

popturf.com / Flickr

It’s a big week for francophones and francophiles in the Milwaukee area. The 19th annual Festival of Films in French returns to the UW-Milwaukee Union Cinema. It features 13 titles from across the French-speaking world, and includes films from Haiti, Madagascar and Montreal. 

ardithelionheart@ymail.com / Flickr

What do two black holes sound like when they collide? Not much. But just detecting it is the first step in unlocking some of the biggest mysteries of our universe.

A century ago, Albert Einstein predicted the presence of gravitational waves - ripples in spacetime created by catastrophic events. Yesterday, researchers from UWM and around the world confirmed their existence with the help of LIGO, a gravitational wave detector that senses those ripples as they pass.

Local guitarist John Plankenhorn and singer Carol Ferrara have been playing together for more than two decades. Their current group, electri-violet, is set to release an album this spring which will feature a new set of original songs written by Plankenhorn.

Over the years, the duo has allowed their sound to shift and evolve, a choice that has given them more freedom to write and grow in their music.

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