Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for The Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

She just moved to Milwaukee’s East Side, where she lives with her cats Misses and Marvin. Joy spends much of her free time drawing, painting and practicing the mandolin.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

vetre / Fotolia

Until recently, scientists didn't understand just how critical adolescence is for human development. And over the next decade, we will likely learn more than ever before about how young minds develop.

That’s because work is starting on a groundbreaking study of the subject. It's called the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development, or ABCD, Study, and nearly two dozen institutions across the U.S. will be participating in the research.

National Atlas of the United States / Department of Interior

Politically, Wisconsin has long been considered a “purple state.” Not Democratic or Republican; a swing state. But all that changed after the 2010 election, when Wisconsin voted a Republican majority into the state assembly. What happened next changed the course of state politics and undermined the very concept of democracy through what was considered a relatively benign practice - gerrymandering.

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Call it what you will: sizzurp, purple drank or lean. They’re all the same. The cough syrup mixture has been a popular drug in some circles for decades, and it’s making a resurgence here in Milwaukee.

The substance is the subject of an article in this month's Milwaukee Magazine, written by freelancer Eben Pindyck. 

Antonio Zugaldia / Flickr

For the last 25 years, The Onion has been the satirical newspaper of record. But as the lines between real and fake news are blurrier than ever, does that mean the end of satire? The paper's founding editor, Scott Dikkers, says this is an age-old question.

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For more than a decade, the level of racial disparity in Wisconsin has been a serious concern. Whether it’s education, income or general quality of life, black Wisconsinites continue to do worse than their white counterparts.

Over the weekend, people on every continent took to the streets to protest the inauguration of President Donald Trump, and support those they say they fear will be marginalized under his administration.

By some estimates, more than 3 million people were involved in the protests which sprouted up in cities across the nation, including several here in Wisconsin.

But many chose to go to our nation's capital by plane, train or automobile. And among them were many marchers from Milwaukee.

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When you think of cities that have a parking problem, Milwaukee most-likely doesn't come to mind. For those who live and work in the city, the biggest issue with parking is usually finding a free spot.

But then of course, there’s Summerfest. Or the State Fair. Or the myriad of other events that take place in and around the city. And waiting in line for parking, when all you really want is a corn dog, can be incredibly frustrating.

Loozrboy / Flickr

The proposed Dakota Access oil pipeline project and the protests against it got a lot of international media attention for what its backers said it would do, and what opponents feared it would do.

Earlier this week, Milwaukee Magazine and Lake Effect kicked off a new, monthly live conversation series. This month’s MilMag Live! event focused on two topics. The first of those was the influence of insiders and outsiders in shaping Milwaukee.

The discussion was led by Lake Effect's Mitch Teich and Carole Nicksin from Milwaukee Magazine. One of the areas of richest discussion was what brings people to Milwaukee, and what drives them away. 

The panel included: 

Joy Powers

If you’ve ever walked around the city, you might have noticed the distinctive tiles adorning some of the older homes in town. They’re small, white ceramic with a black font, and they’re fairly standard.

Listener Dan Osterud wrote to Bubbler Talk to ask about how these numbers came to be. 

He wondered: Why are all the house numbers in the city of Milwaukee the same, all one style of ceramic tile? Was this type of number required by law?

Syda Productions / Fotolia

A visit to the doctor’s office can sometimes be an uncomfortable experience - both physically and psychologically. 

Brian Smith/U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Northeast Region / American Bird Conservancy/Flickr

“Bird-friendly” coffee might sound like coffee brewed and developed for our feathered friends, but it’s actually a certification for what is more commonly referred to as shade grown coffee. It’s coffee grown using agroforestry, which encourages more biodiversity, including a variety of trees, small mammals and birds.

iconimage / Fotolia

Every time you post to Twitter or Facebook, these sites are collecting data about you. At this point you ought to expect that by participating in social media sites, you’re giving up some of your privacy. It’s just the name of the game.

Some see big data from social media sites as a god send for researchers - a perfect way to study social habits with huge numbers of people. But what happens when that data with your personal details still attached is published for a study, for the world to see?

WIDOCC

In the wee hours of the morning on July 1, 2015, Valencia Laws decided it was time to take a walk around Wilson Park. Her water had broken the night before and after eight hours of contractions she set off, accompanied by her husband and her doula, DeAnna Tharpe.

“There were people walking their dogs and I would have a contraction and have to stop,” she said. “They would be looking at me like ‘I don’t know if she’s supposed to be here.’”

But with Tharpe by her side, Laws knew she was exactly where she needed to be.

Kirsten Johnson has spent a quarter of a century standing behind a camera. As a cinematographer she has traveled around the world, meeting people and hearing their stories, while creating images of their lives. Her new documentary, Cameraperson, puts those images into a different perspective.

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