LaToya Dennis

News Reporter

LaToya Dennis joined WUWM in October 2006 as a reporter / producer. LaToya began her career in public radio as a part-time reporter for WKAR AM/FM in East Lansing, Michigan. She worked as general assignment reporter for WKAR for one and a half years while working toward a master's degree in Journalism from Michigan State University. While at WKAR, she covered General Motors plant closings, city and state government, and education among other critical subjects.

Before coming to public radio, LaToya interned at the CBS affiliate in Lansing, Michigan. She also took part in NPR's 2005 Next Generation Radio Project in Kansas City, Missouri as well as NPR's summer 2006 Next Generation Radio Project in Indianapolis, Indiana.

LaToya holds both a Bachelor's degree and a Masters degree in journalism from Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan. Dennis is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists.

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LaToya Dennis

Tragedy again struck Milwaukee this past weekend as a baby boy was shot and killed.

LaToya Dennis

For nearly 20 years, Josie Veal has dedicated her life to helping under-served communities as a nurse.

Wisconsin companies and the U.S. economy excelled in 2014, according to Brian Jacobsen.

Wisconsin Jobs Now, Twitter

Protesters calling for justice for Dontre Hamilton and other black men killed by police blocked traffic late Friday on I-43 in Milwaukee. Police arrested 73 adults and one minor.

County Board Staff

Milwaukee County's five African American supervisors spoke in support of Dontre Hamilton, and the other black men many believe have been unjustly killed by police.

It’s been about three months since the Milwaukee Public School System named 36-year-old Darienne Driver as its Superintendent.

LaToya Dennis

In just a few weeks, President Obama will tell five million undocumented immigrants what they must do to avoid deportation.

Elliott Torrence​

A grassroots movement is underway in Milwaukee’s 53206 zip code to improve the lives of young African American men who live there.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Business owners are optimistic about the future, according to a new survey by Milwaukee-based Manpower.

Photos.com

Wisconsin’s drinking culture sometimes leads to tragedies on the road - when impaired drivers get behind the wheel.

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