LaToya Dennis

News Reporter

LaToya Dennis joined WUWM in October 2006 as a reporter / producer. LaToya began her career in public radio as a part-time reporter for WKAR AM/FM in East Lansing, Michigan. She worked as general assignment reporter for WKAR for one and a half years while working toward a master's degree in Journalism from Michigan State University. While at WKAR, she covered General Motors plant closings, city and state government, and education among other critical subjects.

Before coming to public radio, LaToya interned at the CBS affiliate in Lansing, Michigan. She also took part in NPR's 2005 Next Generation Radio Project in Kansas City, Missouri as well as NPR's summer 2006 Next Generation Radio Project in Indianapolis, Indiana.

LaToya holds both a Bachelor's degree and a Masters degree in journalism from Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan. Dennis is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists.

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LaToya Dennis

In just a few weeks, President Obama will tell five million undocumented immigrants what they must do to avoid deportation.

Elliott Torrence​

A grassroots movement is underway in Milwaukee’s 53206 zip code to improve the lives of young African American men who live there.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Business owners are optimistic about the future, according to a new survey by Milwaukee-based Manpower.

Photos.com

Wisconsin’s drinking culture sometimes leads to tragedies on the road - when impaired drivers get behind the wheel.

Marco Scisetti - Fotolia.com

Today is Cyber Monday – the day online holiday shopping is in full swing.

LaToya Dennis

The biggest shopping day of the year means hiring extra workers, not to mention moving tons of merchandise.

LaToya Dennis

Pres. Obama will allow five million immigrants in the U.S. illegally, to as he put it, “come out of the shadows,” at least temporarily.

Two outside groups made their case this week in both Madison and Milwaukee, that the state should make changes in a couple programs.  

Two conservative-leaning groups plan to outline for Wisconsin – how it could adjust its retirement programs for public workers and its long-term care program for residents.

Family and friends laid five-year-old Laylah Petersen to rest on Wednesday.

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