Marge Pitrof

News Director

Marge has been with WUWM since it changed formats from music to news and information in the late 1980’s. Searching for a place where she could produce in-depth journalism, Marge was hired by WUWM as a reporter. For several years, Marge also hosted Morning Edition.

While a reporter, Marge was a frequent contributor to NPR and won numerous awards for her work.

Since fall of 2000, Marge has been managing the news department but still has the occasional opportunity to produce stories.

Prior to joining WUWM, Marge worked in commercial radio both as an afternoon news anchor and a field reporter. She also worked for short periods at a few TV stations.

» Contact WUWM News

Mark Gottlieb has reportedly tendered his resignation to Gov. Walker, effective January 6, as secretary of Wisconsin's Dept. of Transportation. The DOT is facing a one billion dollar deficit and sharply differing opinions about how to address it. 

Win McNamee/Getty Images

If Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke does not resign, three Democrats from Milwaukee want Governor Walker to remove Clarke from office.

State Sen. Chris Larson and Reps. Christine Sinicki and Jonathan Brostoff call Clarke "a dangerous menace," citing four deaths that have occurred in the county jail in recent months, including of a newborn.

katie wheeler, flickr

Just six months into his term, Reserve Judge Robert Kinney has resigned from the new Wisconsin Ethics Commission, saying its rules require too much secrecy and almost completely shut out the public.

Kinney says the final straw for him occurred in October, when three members of the commission voted to strike from its mission statement the words, "furthering Wisconsin's tradition of clean and open government," although those words still appear on the panel's web site.

Marti Mikkelson

Update, Dec. 12 3:30 P.M.

The Wisconsin Election Commission has certified the state's recount of its presidential election and reports that Republican Donald Trump actually won the state with 131 more votes than the initial tally indicated. The recount also indicated that there were no major flaws that affected the Wisconsin count, although workers did have to toss or change hundreds of votes because of errors detected.

Michelle Maternowski

Update, Dec. 2, 4:08 P.M.

A federal court in Madison will not temporarily halt the Wisconsin recount, while opponents challenge it. U.S. District Judge James Peterson will let both the recount and the legal challenge proceed simultaneously. He rejected a motion from Trump supporters to halt the process, stating that there is no harm in allowing the recount to continue. Peterson has scheduled a court hearing on their lawsuit for Dec. 9, just four days before the state's final vote tally is due.   

Update, Dec. 2:

mementosis, flickr

On Thursday, the City of Milwaukee announced the first-ever Drug Mail Back Program. It will allow you to easily dispose of unused or unwanted prescription drugs stashed in your medicine cabinet. At select CVS pharmacies, you will find envelopes addressed to the police department. In them, you can pour unwanted medicines and drop the envelopes in the mail.

“While in one way, it is just a small initiative, it is certainly a vital one to stemming this growing crisis,”  says Milwaukee Alderman Jim Bohl.

Wisconsin State Legislature

A three-judge federal panel ruled on Monday that the political boundaries state Republican legislators drew in 2011 violate the voting rights of Democrats. Wisconsin's Attorney  General says he plans to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Melvin Laird served as President Richard Nixon's first Defense Secretary and helped orchestrate the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Vietnam.

The former Wisconsin Congressman from central Wisconsin also phoned to ask his friend and fellow Congressman Gerald Ford of Michigan, whether he would be interested in becoming Nixon's Vice President, after Spiro Agnew resigned amid a financial scandal. Ford agreed and later become President, after Nixon resigned because of the Watergate crimes and cover-up. At the time, Laird had been Nixon's Counselor on Domestic Affairs.

A study has commenced at UW-Madison, to determine whether Wisconsin's Voter ID law contributed to the state's lowest turnout for a presidential election in more than two decades. Approximately 66 percent of eligible state voters cast ballots in the November 8th election, down about four percentage points compared with 2012 and three percentage points from what Wisconsin elections officials had forecast.

Brett Roseman, UW-Stout

The hunt is on in Menomonie, Wisconsin for the assailant who fatally beat a student from the University of Wisconsin-Stout. The student Hussain Saeed Alnahdi was from Saudi Arabia and had been in the downtown bar area where many young people were celebrating Halloween early Sunday.

Menomonie police say they are talking with people who were in the neighborhood and are collecting surveillance video from local businesses, hoping it provides clues as to who attacked Alnahdi.

Investigators say one witness reported seeing a white male run from the scene.

Justin Sullivan and Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Democrat Hillary Clinton's lead over Republican Donald Trump declined in Wisconsin from seven to six points during the past two weeks and now stands at 46%-40% among likely voters, according to the final Marquette Law School poll before the Nov. 8 Election. 

The margin of error is +/- 3.3 percentage points.

The MPD, on Monday, terminated officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown who was arrested earlier this month on accusations of sexual assault.

According to the department, an internal investigation found that Heaggan-Brown violated the Milwaukee Police Code of Conduct. It states in part that, “Whether on or off duty, department members shall not behave in such a way that a reasonable person would expect that discredit could be brought upon the department, or that it would create the appearance of impropriety or corruptive behavior.”

Oct. 17 update: U.S. District Judge James Peterson has signed off on the new one-page handout the state has created, to easily explain to would-be voters the process for obtaining photo identification for voting. The DOT will distribute the handout to ID applicants who visit DMV offices and also to voter advocacy groups.

Rachel Morello

According to the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Milwaukee Public School is no longer required to take part in OSPP, the state's Opportunity Schools and Partnership Program.

This comes after months of drama surrounding that initiative, and the resignation of the person who was supposed to head it in Milwaukee.

The state legislature created OSPP in 2015, as a way to turn around struggling school districts across the state. Any district that falls in the lowest category on a state report card, for two consecutive years, is required to participate.

U.S. District Judge James Peterson on Friday ordered Wisconsin to investigate whether some transportation employees have been failing to help people obtain temporary identification for voting if they lack a supporting document for a regular ID such as a birth certificate.

Wisconsin law now requires people to present a government-issued photo identification in order to cast a ballot. But because some people don't have easy access to the documents needed to get a Wisconsin ID,  Peterson ordered the state, in July, to come up with a contingency plan.

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