Marge Pitrof

News Director

Marge has been with WUWM since it changed formats from music to news and information in the late 1980s. Searching for a place where she could produce in-depth journalism, Marge was hired by WUWM as a reporter. For several years, Marge also hosted Morning Edition.

While a reporter, Marge was a frequent contributor to NPR and won numerous awards for her work.

Since fall of 2000, Marge has been managing the news department but still has the occasional opportunity to produce stories. Under her leadership, the team has won scores of professional awards, appeared on national broadcasts, trained dozens of interns and collaborated with organizations such as NPR, Milwaukee PBS and the International Center for Journalists, on a range of projects.

Prior to joining WUWM, Marge worked in commercial radio both as an afternoon news anchor and a field reporter. She also worked for short periods at a few TV stations.

» Contact WUWM News

A Syrian refugee living in Dane County filed a lawsuit this month against President Trump's now-stalled travel ban. The U.S. granted the man asylum because soldiers in Syria had imprisoned and tortured him, but his wife and three-year-old daughter remained behind, in Aleppo. He had applied for his family to join him but said the Trump ban halted the procedure, so he sued.

The U.S. House has voted to scrap a recent Dept. of Labor regulation, to the delight of Governor Scott Walker. For some time, he has wanted Wisconsin to drug test laid-off workers who apply for unemployment insurance, but Walker says the Obama administration set narrow circumstances in which states can drug test UI applicants, such as, if the person's occupation requires a firearm.

Andy Stenz

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker says he has spoken with Vice President Mike Pence about how the new Trump administration could apply parts of Act 10 to federal employees.

Marge Pitrof

Some religious leaders in Milwaukee are condemning President Trump’s 90-day ban on immigrants from seven Muslim-majority nations.

The faith leaders expressed their concerns Sunday at an interfaith gathering the local Ahamdiyya Muslim Community coordinated at Humboldt Park.

While the event was planned long before Trump signed his executive order on Friday, the ban - and the massive protests it has sparked - were on many minds.

Image from Facebook

While hundreds of people gathered at airports across the U.S. to protest President Trump's three-month ban on immigrants from a half-dozen Muslim-majority nations, scores of demonstrators held signs and rallied in Milwaukee on Saturday, outside the federal building on East Wisconsin Avenue.

Wisconsin State Legislature

A three-judge federal panel on Friday told the Legislature to redraw Wisconsin's legislative boundaries and to complete the job by November. Opponents of the existing maps wanted judges to redraw them but are pleased that the federal panel is demanding change and yet this year.

Rachel Morello

Hundreds of people in the Milwaukee area spent part of the weekend demonstrating their concerns about the new Trump administration, by taking part in rallies.

Saturday morning, scores of people marched through the streets of Milwaukee's Riverwest neighborhood. Organizers billed the event as a "Femme Solidarity March," as it coincided with the massive march that took place in Washington D.C. and in other cities around the country and world.

Marge Pitrof

The Obama administration's Affordable Care Act is not perfect, but it has enabled the United States to take a major step forward in making health insurance available to all Americans, multiple speakers told a crowd Sunday morning, on Milwaukee's south side.

Marge Pitrof

Demonstrators in Milwaukee pledged to fight any new policies emerging from a Trump White House that would weaken protections for undocumented immigrants, migrant dairy workers, students, members of the Muslim religion, LGBT community and refugees.

Late Saturday morning, the protesters marched from the near south side to the Milwaukee County Courthouse where speakers and music stirred the crowd. Dozens of people had driven in from Madison, Racine and other Wisconsin cities, to take part.

Mark Gottlieb has reportedly tendered his resignation to Gov. Walker, effective January 6, as secretary of Wisconsin's Dept. of Transportation. The DOT is facing a one billion dollar deficit and sharply differing opinions about how to address it. 

Win McNamee/Getty Images

If Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke does not resign, three Democrats from Milwaukee want Governor Walker to remove Clarke from office.

State Sen. Chris Larson and Reps. Christine Sinicki and Jonathan Brostoff call Clarke "a dangerous menace," citing four deaths that have occurred in the county jail in recent months, including of a newborn.

katie wheeler, flickr

Just six months into his term, Reserve Judge Robert Kinney has resigned from the new Wisconsin Ethics Commission, saying its rules require too much secrecy and almost completely shut out the public.

Kinney says the final straw for him occurred in October, when three members of the commission voted to strike from its mission statement the words, "furthering Wisconsin's tradition of clean and open government," although those words still appear on the panel's web site.

Marti Mikkelson

Update, Dec. 12 3:30 P.M.

The Wisconsin Election Commission has certified the state's recount of its presidential election and reports that Republican Donald Trump actually won the state with 131 more votes than the initial tally indicated. The recount also indicated that there were no major flaws that affected the Wisconsin count, although workers did have to toss or change hundreds of votes because of errors detected.

Michelle Maternowski

Update, Dec. 2, 4:08 P.M.

A federal court in Madison will not temporarily halt the Wisconsin recount, while opponents challenge it. U.S. District Judge James Peterson will let both the recount and the legal challenge proceed simultaneously. He rejected a motion from Trump supporters to halt the process, stating that there is no harm in allowing the recount to continue. Peterson has scheduled a court hearing on their lawsuit for Dec. 9, just four days before the state's final vote tally is due.   

Update, Dec. 2:

mementosis, flickr

On Thursday, the City of Milwaukee announced the first-ever Drug Mail Back Program. It will allow you to easily dispose of unused or unwanted prescription drugs stashed in your medicine cabinet. At select CVS pharmacies, you will find envelopes addressed to the police department. In them, you can pour unwanted medicines and drop the envelopes in the mail.

“While in one way, it is just a small initiative, it is certainly a vital one to stemming this growing crisis,”  says Milwaukee Alderman Jim Bohl.

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