Marge Pitrof

News Director

Marge has been with WUWM since it changed formats from music to news and information in the late 1980’s. Searching for a place where she could produce in-depth journalism, Marge was hired by WUWM as a reporter. For several years, Marge also hosted Morning Edition.

While a reporter, Marge was a frequent contributor to NPR and won numerous awards for her work.

Since fall of 2000, Marge has been managing the news department but still has the occasional opportunity to produce stories.

Prior to joining WUWM, Marge worked in commercial radio both as an afternoon news anchor and a field reporter. She also worked for short periods at a few TV stations.

» Contact WUWM News

Wisconsin State Legislature

Twelve Wisconsin residents are suing the state in federal court over the Assembly districts Republicans created following the 2010 census. The plaintiffs say the boundaries are unconstitutional and waste people's votes. 

The lawsuit asks the court to prohibit the state from using the map in next year's elections.

Milwaukee's latest homicide victim is a 13-year-old boy. He was shot to death early Wednesday morning, in his home near Lincoln Park. Police say they are searching for a known suspect. The boy's death brings the number of homicides in the city so far this year to 83, nearly the total for all of 2014.

Police Chief Edward Flynn says the problems and solutions are not simple, but it is possible to identify many people who need intervention because they are a highly-concentrated population.

It appears the plan the state Senate will consider on Tuesday would scrap prevailing wages in local communities but maintain them for state projects.

Wisconsin's prevailing wage law has been on the books since the early 1930s. It requires companies that contract with the state or local governments to pay their employees the prevailing wage for that community. Every year, the Dept. of Workforce Development sets the wage by surveying companies about how much they're paying their workers.

S Bence

Besides weakening Wisconsin's open records law, other last-minute items Republican legislators inserted into the proposed state budget on Thursday include allowing a seven-day work week and requiring municipalities with water and sewer utilities to service neighbors who need it.

Milwaukee County supervisors hope the public takes note of another addition. It would transfer more power to the county executive, including authority over county land along Milwaukee's downtown lakefront.

Update: Gov. Walker says he and Republican legislative leaders (Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos and Joint Finance Committee Co-chairs Sen. Alberta Darling and Rep. John Nygren) have decided to remove open records changes from the state budget and instead form a committee to study the issue.

Michelle Maternowski

The free bus service on July 6 is meant to thank regular riders for their adaptability during the three-day strike, according to County Executive Chris Abele.

Union drivers walked off the job early Wednesday, after they and the Milwaukee County Transit System failed to reach a new contract agreement. The union says its drivers plan to return to the job early Saturday morning, even though they don't yet have a new contract.

President Obama
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The president spoke Thursday afternoon at UW-La Crosse on the same day that Governor Walker reportedly signed papers to mount a run for the GOP presidential nomination. He's expected to formally announce his candidacy on July 13 in Waukesha.

Obama did not mention Walker by name, but drew applause from the crowd when saying that people's "right to organize and bargain was attacked," an apparent reference to the governor's Act 10 that stripped away public union rights and the right-to-work law he signed this year, which outlaws mandatory union dues in the private sector.

While the Milwaukee County Transit System and its union bus drivers remain at a budget stalemate, several organizations are offering residents options for travel, including to Summerfest and the July 3 lakefront fireworks.

In addition, at least one church is helping organize carpools, especially for people who need to reach grocery stores and medical appointments.

Michelle Maternowski

It appears all-day federal mediation on Tuesday failed to break the contract impasse between union bus drivers and the Milwaukee County Transit System. So the drivers plan to walk off the job at three o'clock Wednesday morning, after buses transport thousands of people who ride to Summerfest.

On Monday, members of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 998 rejected the latest contract offer from the transit system. Union leaders say members particularly oppose the system's desire to hire part-time drivers.

Most Assembly Republicans want Wisconsin to mete out delays statewide and not spare the massive Zoo Interchange reconstruction project in Milwaukee.

On Monday, 33 of 63 GOP representatives put their demands in a letter Monday to Gov. Walker and Republican legislative leaders. The 33, who represent rural and out-state districts, say they want to rein in spending on transportation until the state has the money but want any resulting delays to affect all corners of Wisconsin.