Marge Pitrof

News Director

Marge has been with WUWM since it changed formats from music to news and information in the late 1980’s. Searching for a place where she could produce in-depth journalism, Marge was hired by WUWM as a reporter. For several years, Marge also hosted Morning Edition.

While a reporter, Marge was a frequent contributor to NPR and won numerous awards for her work.

Since fall of 2000, Marge has been managing the news department but still has the occasional opportunity to produce stories.

Prior to joining WUWM, Marge worked in commercial radio both as an afternoon news anchor and a field reporter. She also worked for short periods at a few TV stations.

» Contact WUWM News

Darren Hauck/Getty Images

If Wisconsin Republicans voted in their presidential primary today, 25% would pick Gov. Scott Walker, according to the new Marquette Law School Poll. In April, 40% said they would select Walker.

Most state GOP voters favor other Republican candidates. Following Walker (25%) are Ben Carson (13%), Donald Trump (9%), Ted Cruz (8%), Marco Rubio and Carly Fiorina (each 7%) and Jeb Bush (6%).

UWM

The money will establish a Lubar Center for Entrepreneurship at UWM, on the corner of Kenwood Blvd. and Maryland Ave.  According to UWM Chancellor Mark Mone, the Lubar Center will house many of UWM's programs that prepare students to be entrepreneurs and innovators, and it will assist start-up local companies that are striving to bring more services and products to market.

"Wisconsin has fallen behind other states in creating new jobs and launching startup companies... bolstering this kind of entrepreneurial ecosystem is vital to a healthy economy and job creation,” Mone said.

Courtesy of the Milwaukee Bucks

The Wisconsin Assembly on Tuesday approved a funding deal for a new arena in Milwaukee. It would cover the public share; the Bucks’ former and current owners will contribute $250 million in private money. So after months of debate, the bill is headed to the desk of Gov. Scott Walker. The vote was not unanimous, 52 to 34, but the legislation did garner bipartisan support.

Marti Mikkelson

The consensus is that Milwaukee's elusive animal is someone’s exotic pet, according to Karen Sparapani, executive director of the Milwaukee Area Domestic Animal Control Commission.

Her goal is to capture, not kill the big cat several people have reported seeing on the city's north side since last week.

Tia Nelson has resigned from her job with the Wisconsin Board of Commissioners of Public Lands, according to the Wisconsin State Journal. Nelson has served as the agency's executive secretary since 2004. Her father was Earth Day Founder and late Wisconsin U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson.

In April, the board prohibited Nelson and her staff from talking about climate change on the job or working on issues related to climate change. The ban came, after board member and State Treasurer Matt Adamczyk insisted the agency remove all climate change references from its website.

Wisconsin National Guard, flickr

The governor says he wants Wisconsin National Guard members to be able to protect themselves from attack, citing the shootings that killed five servicemen in Chattanooga, Tennessee last week.

Gov. Walker issued an executive order on Tuesday giving the state's Adjutant General Donald Dunbar the authority to arm guard members as necessary and to evaluate longer-term plans to better protect all of Wisconsin's soldiers.

Sgt. Carson Holmquist, who grew up in Grantsburg, was one of four marines a gunman killed this week in Tennessee.  Holmquist was a 2008 graduate of Grantsburg High School in western Wisconsin, before he joined the U.S. Marines. Among the places he served was Afghanistan.

His alma mater's principal says Holmquist was a great young man who enjoyed football, hunting and fishing and returned proudly to his high school after boot camp, dressed in his blue uniform.

Grantsburg is a community of about 1,300, near the western border of Wisconsin, in Polk County.

Agents in 20 countries helped coordinate a series of arrests on Wednesday, to bring down a computer hacking forum known as Darkode. The alleged creator is 27 year old Daniel Placek of Glendale, Wisconsin, also known in circles as Nocen, Loki, Juggernaut and M1rror. He will face charges in federal court in Milwaukee, including conspiracy to commit computer fraud.

Fugitive Safe Surrender : Cleveland

Fugitive Safe Surrender programs let people wanted for non-violent offenses turn themselves in at a church. The planning required for the July 2016 Milwaukee event is extensive, but the results could be remarkable, if they mirror what other cities have experienced.

As many as 50,000 fugitives have peacefully surrendered across the county since communities began offering the program a decade ago.

Gov. Walker signed a $72 billion, two-year spending plan into law for  Wisconsin on Sunday at a manufacturing plant in Waukesha, as he prepares to launch a bid for the Republican nomination for president. He will make his announcement at the Waukesha Expo Center late Monday.

In signing the dense budget bill into law, Walker said it is all about keeping taxpayers first. He says his actions lower the average property tax bill, freeze UW System tuition for two more years, put resources into working training and require drug testing for many people receiving public benefits.

Milwaukee's latest homicide victim is a 13-year-old boy. He was shot to death early Wednesday morning, in his home near Lincoln Park. Police say they are searching for a known suspect. The boy's death brings the number of homicides in the city so far this year to 83, nearly the total for all of 2014.

Police Chief Edward Flynn says the problems and solutions are not simple, but it is possible to identify many people who need intervention because they are a highly-concentrated population.

It appears the plan the state Senate will consider on Tuesday would scrap prevailing wages in local communities but maintain them for state projects.

Wisconsin's prevailing wage law has been on the books since the early 1930s. It requires companies that contract with the state or local governments to pay their employees the prevailing wage for that community. Every year, the Dept. of Workforce Development sets the wage by surveying companies about how much they're paying their workers.

S Bence

Besides weakening Wisconsin's open records law, other last-minute items Republican legislators inserted into the proposed state budget on Thursday include allowing a seven-day work week and requiring municipalities with water and sewer utilities to service neighbors who need it.

Milwaukee County supervisors hope the public takes note of another addition. It would transfer more power to the county executive, including authority over county land along Milwaukee's downtown lakefront.

Update: Gov. Walker says he and Republican legislative leaders (Sen. Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos and Joint Finance Committee Co-chairs Sen. Alberta Darling and Rep. John Nygren) have decided to remove open records changes from the state budget and instead form a committee to study the issue.

Michelle Maternowski

The free bus service on July 6 is meant to thank regular riders for their adaptability during the three-day strike, according to County Executive Chris Abele.

Union drivers walked off the job early Wednesday, after they and the Milwaukee County Transit System failed to reach a new contract agreement. The union says its drivers plan to return to the job early Saturday morning, even though they don't yet have a new contract.

Pages