Marge Pitrof

News Director

Marge has been with WUWM since it changed formats from music to news and information in the late 1980’s. Searching for a place where she could produce in-depth journalism, Marge was hired by WUWM as a reporter. For several years, Marge also hosted Morning Edition.

While a reporter, Marge was a frequent contributor to NPR and won numerous awards for her work.

Since fall of 2000, Marge has been managing the news department but still has the occasional opportunity to produce stories.

Prior to joining WUWM, Marge worked in commercial radio both as an afternoon news anchor and a field reporter. She also worked for short periods at a few TV stations.

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Marge Pitrof

State Republican leaders issued dueling press releases on Thursday, about their positions related to transportation funding in the next state budget.

Sen. Alberta Darling says will not retract her comment that Assembly leaders want to delay work on the Zoo Interchange, in order to pressure the state Senate to approve a hike in the gas tax or vehicle registration fees.

Anne Nicol Gaylor was 88 years old, when she died late Sunday at a hospice in Fitchburg, Wisconsin. Gaylor propelled the creation of the Freedom From Religion Foundation in 1976 and served as its president until 2004. It went national in 1978 and claims 23,000 members today. The organization has continuously launched legal actions to keep religion and government separate and prevailed, for instance, at having Wisconsin's Good Friday holiday declared unconstitutional.

Gaylor also fought for abortion rights and helped start programs to benefit indigent women.

This week, highway crews across the state will post 70 mph speed limit signs to replace those that read 65 mph. The Legislature recently approved the bump in speeds on approximately 810 miles of Interstate. Most of the work - 470 new signs, should be done by Wednesday.

According to the DOT, the higher speed limit takes effect as soon as the sign is posted.

The Wisconsin Senate voted along party lines to seat Michael M. Grebe on the UW Board of Regents for a seven-year term.

The board oversees Wisconsin’s university system. Governor Walker nominated Grebe and Republicans confirmed his appointment on Tuesday.

Senate Democrats unsuccessfully urged a 'no' vote, expressing concerns about Grebe's political links with Gov. Walker and statements Grebe has made.

Grebe's father headed the governor's campaigns and oversees the conservative Bradley Foundation.

Gus Ramirez wants to build a four-story school on 5th and Harrison, in Milwaukee's Walker's Point/Bay View neighborhoods. The school he envisions would educate children living in the area and would be either a charter or voucher school, in essence, an alternative to MPS.

On Monday, the City Plan Commission voted unanimously in favor of rezoning the land, so that it could accommodate a school. The recommendation now goes before a Common Council committee.

The governor summoned elected leaders to a press conference Wednesday afternoon in Madison, to jointly announce a plan under which taxpayers would put $250 million toward a new $500 million venue for the NBA team. The former and current owners of the Milwaukee Bucks have put $250 million on the table.

The rules would would ban abortions in Wisconsin after 20 weeks. If a medical emergency arises later, physicians must try to keep the fetus alive. Doctors would face criminal charges for violating the rules and could be sued both the woman and the father.

The Senate Committee on Health and Human Services approved the bill on a party line, 3-2 vote Thursday, with Republicans voting in favor and Democrats against. The item now moves to the full state Senate.


Tuesday's 10-3 vote would reduce the maximum fine from $500 to $50 for possessing 25 grams of marijuana or less in the City of Milwaukee.

Supporters of the reduction, including members of the African American Roundtable, say it will help address a racial injustice because blacks in Milwaukee are five times more likely than whites to be arrested for marijuana possession, despite similar usage rates.

Google Map

The project would primarily target the 53206 zip code area. People with outstanding arrest warrants could surrender to authorities at faith-based locations. Groups would help guide those individuals in paying their debts to society, enabling them to shed outstanding issues and move forward with their lives.

A steering committee would decide which offenses are eligible and what the penalties would be for those individuals, if they surrender. MICAH estimates 50,000 people might qualify. They are wanted for such offenses as burglary, certain drug crimes and unpaid traffic fines.

Medical College of Wisconsin, Facebook

The pharmacy school is expected to open in mid-2017 or 2018, with a class of 60 students. According to the Medical College, Wisconsin needs to develop more highly-qualified pharmacists, particularly to serve in communities and medical fields experiencing shortages.

A national search has commenced to hire a dean to oversee the new school. As the project advances, it will bring aboard faculty and staff.

The cost of the start-up is estimated at $30 million.